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Transportation Yosemeti to Lone Pine

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  • steveddy54
    I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from
    Message 1 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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      I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.
    • robert shattuck
      Steve, I swore I d stop bothering to try and get everyone to hike the JMT from north to south, but just curious, why do you want to do it, starting down
      Message 2 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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        Steve, 

        I swore I'd stop bothering to try and get everyone to hike the JMT from north to south, but just curious, why do you want to do it, starting down south--especially since you're already going to be in Yosemite??

        Give us some details like where you are flying into. 

        To answer your question though, you're pretty much looking at a two- day trip, assuming that maybe you are taking AMTRAK from the west side. 

        You can Amtrak from San Francisco (for example) get into the valley by 145 pm and then catch a YARTS bus out to mammoth at about 5pm. 

        This will only get you to Mammoth where you would spend the night and catch the ESTA bus in the morning , which will get you to Lone Pine by about noon. 

        In lone pine you can either pay for a shuttle or just thumb up to Whitney portal. 

        I would do your research and start with Eastern Sierra transit Authority, but I am betting you won't get any further than mammoth in the evening. 

        You could pay a big chunk of change and hope that one of the private shuttle services will pick you up in mammoth, but really , I think you're looking at two days unless your wallet is fat or your thumb lucky. 

        Bob Shattuck 

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Dec 27, 2013, at 8:06 PM, steveddy54@... wrote:

         

        I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.

      • Steve Eddy
        I swore I d stop bothering to try and get everyone to hike the JMT from north to south, but just curious, why do you want to do it, starting down
        Message 3 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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          I swore I'd stop bothering to try and get everyone to hike the JMT from north to south, but just curious, why do you want to do it, starting down south--especially since you're already going to be in Yosemite??


          My rationale for going South to North is as follows:

          a. I understand permits are easier to obtain. Starting at Happy Isles only permits for six people a day are issued (other than those reserved for walk up). I am part of a three person group, making the odds of getting a permit probably small. Weekday permits through the Mt Whitney Lottery system might be a little easier. If we are unsuccessful at getting a permit to enter at the Whitney Portal then will need to try the other way.

          b. The southern half of the trip is the most difficult and I think it might be prudent to start that past rested.

          We are planning on going late August to early September, starting whenever we can get an entry permit. Why is it a better idea to go go North to South?







           



        • Bobbie Surber
          Still trying to figure out statistically what is the most popular route, north to south or south to north? Thanks! Bobbie ... -- Thank you, Bobbie Bobbie
          Message 4 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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            Still trying to figure out statistically what is the most popular route, north to south or south to north?

            Thanks! 
            Bobbie


            On Friday, December 27, 2013, Steve Eddy wrote:
             

            I swore I'd stop bothering to try and get everyone to hike the JMT from north to south, but just curious, why do you want to do it, starting down south--especially since you're already going to be in Yosemite??


            My rationale for going South to North is as follows:

            a. I understand permits are easier to obtain. Starting at Happy Isles only permits for six people a day are issued (other than those reserved for walk up). I am part of a three person group, making the odds of getting a permit probably small. Weekday permits through the Mt Whitney Lottery system might be a little easier. If we are unsuccessful at getting a permit to enter at the Whitney Portal then will need to try the other way.

            b. The southern half of the trip is the most difficult and I think it might be prudent to start that past rested.

            We are planning on going late August to early September, starting whenever we can get an entry permit. Why is it a better idea to go go North to South?







             





            --
            Thank you,
             
            Bobbie
            Bobbie Surber - LEED AP
            928 203-6124
             

          • cehauser1
            Bobbie: John Ladd would know for sure (from his survey), but I think 80-90% of people hike north to south, Yosemite to Whitney. Chris. ... Still trying to
            Message 5 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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              Bobbie:

              John Ladd would know for sure (from his survey), but I think 80-90% of people hike north to south, Yosemite to Whitney.


              Chris.

              ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <bobbiesurber2012@...> wrote:

              Still trying to figure out statistically what is the most popular route, north to south or south to north?

              Thanks! 
              Bobbie


            • robert shattuck
              b. The southern half of the trip is the most difficult and I think it might be prudent to start that past rested. Steve, If I read this correctly, you think
              Message 6 of 25 , Dec 27, 2013
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                "b. The southern half of the trip is the most difficult and I think it might be prudent to start that past rested." 

                Steve, 

                If I read this correctly, you think that starting from the south, with all the high passes and elevation gain would be good to do in the very beginning. It might be, or might not. 

                Most people do the JMT from north to south for, if for anything, to acclimate slowly and build up to the high passes of the second half. 

                I'm sure you're experienced, but just the idea that you think you might knock off the hard stuff first, makes me curious as I've known a few people that took this same idea, but starting and struggling with the higher altitudes of the southern half, put an end to their trips, early.

                I've done the trail several times, always with a walk-up permit and usually solo and due to this, I have never much concerned myself with all the details of quotas and so on––I've just always been able to get a permit upon my arrival. 

                I don't think getting a permit for three out of "the valley" ( be it Happy Isles or Glacier Point ) would be anymore difficult than getting one down in Lone Pine, to start at Whitney–––if anything you might end up spending as much time on either end, trying for a permit and certainly, with the regulations around Whitney, it might be even harder. 

                And then, regarding your initial question of how to get to the southern end, conveniently, well . . . there isn't anything much easier than starting in Yosemite, having taken AMTRAK from SF or Fresno or . . . 

                I also forgot to mention that if you could fly into Reno or Even Mammoth, you'd probably have a better chance of making the right connections to get you to LP in a day. 

                There's an ESTA bus that gets into the Reno airport at about noon and undoubtedly turns around and goes south, which would put you in Lone Pine in the late afternoon . . . 



                BOB
                http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




              • Paul Fretheim
                I operate a shuttle service, East Side Sierra Shuttle. We do that run all the time. Fare is $400 for up to two passengers with $80 for additional persons. That
                Message 7 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                  I operate a shuttle service, East Side Sierra Shuttle. We do that run all the time. Fare is $400 for up to two passengers with $80 for additional persons. That is Whitney Portal to Yosemite Valley. The fare from Whitney Portal to Tuolumne Meadows is $ 280 plus $50 for additional passengers after the first 2. It's possible to ride the YARTS bus from Tuolumne to the Valley. Fare was $15 each last season. The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley. Buses do not go to Whitney Portal.

                  Thank you for your interest in our services.

                  Paul Fretheim
                  East Side Sierra Shuttle
                  paul@...
                  760-878-8047
                  http://eastsidesierrashuttle.com

                  On Dec 27, 2013 8:06 PM, <steveddy54@...> wrote:
                   

                  I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.

                • groundhogsteve
                  Steve- Public transit on the east side of the Sierras consists of YARTS and ESTA YARTS Website: http://www.yarts.com/schedules.html YARTS provides service from
                  Message 8 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                    Steve-

                    Public transit on the east side of the Sierras consists of YARTS and ESTA

                    YARTS Website: http://www.yarts.com/schedules.html

                    YARTS provides service from Merced Amtrak to Yosemite Valley, and the Valley over Tioga Pass to Mammoth Lakes via Tuolumne Meadows.  Pay attention to the days of the week and the months of operation for the Tioga Pass route.

                    ESTA Website: http://www.estransit.com/CMS/content/395-routes

                    ESTA provides service from the Lancaster Metrolink (LA commuter train system) train station to Reno, and stops at Mojave.  Pay attention to the days of the week on the schedules - not all runs are daily

                    Amtrak provides a way to get to YARTS (at the Merced Amtrak Station) and ESTA (via Amtrak throughway bus from Bakersfield or LA area points to Mojave) and also serves a stop in Reno that is six blocks from the Greyhound  station that ESTA serves.

                    Amtrak San Joaquin Schedule (SF Bay Area/Sacramento to Merced and Bakersfield;Bakersfield- Mojave bus is on page 4): http://www.amtrak.com/ccurl/683/59/San-Joaquin-Schedule-011314.pdf


                    Please note there is an error on the Amtrak San Joaquin schedule that says the YARTS bus over Tioga pass operates weekDAYS in June and September, that's incorrect.  It's actually weekENDS in June and September, daily in July and August.  I notified both Amtrak and YARTS about this mistake last year, it hasn't been corrected.


                    Amtrak Capitol Corridor (San Jose/SF-Sacramento with connecting bus service to Reno: http://www.amtrak.com/ccurl/720/138/Capitol-Corridor-Schedule-011314.pdf


                    Amtrak California Zephyr (Train between SF Bay Area and Chicago, daily both ways, additional means to get to Reno): http://www.amtrak.com/ccurl/708/846/California-Zephyr-Schedule-011314.pdf


                    Amtrak Coast Starlight (daily train from LA to Seattle, connects to other Amtrak services at Emeryville (Oakland) Martinez and Sacramento.


                    From those schedules, you should be able to figure out what you need.





                  • John Ladd
                    ... Due to the way I recruited for the survey, it can t capture the proportions. Since I was walking North, I d run into way more Southbounders than I would
                    Message 9 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                      On Fri, Dec 27, 2013 at 9:54 PM, <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                      John Ladd would know for sure (from his survey), but I think 80-90% of people hike north to south, Yosemite to Whitney.

                      Due to the way I recruited for the survey, it can't capture the proportions. Since I was walking North, I'd run into way more Southbounders than I would Northbounders, even if the proportions were equal.

                      That said, it is clear that the vast majority of JMT thru-hikers go southbound - 90% is probably about right. Section hikers are probably more evenly distributed and some people do out-and-backs on the same route - e.g., Roads End in Kings Canyon via Paradise Valley to Whitney and back again via Bubbs Creek (a particularly nice hike)

                      It's significantly harder (other than for permits) to hike northbound. You start immediately at high elevations, which makes acclimation harder. You have the longest stretch without resupply at a Northbound start,. forcing you to start with a heavy load. And the higher and more closely spaced passes take a toll.

                      I personally like Northbound because you get more solitude. While you cross paths with more people, and get a chance to say hello, you don't end up chatting up the same people day after day, which tends to happen hiking with the usual flow of traffic. But it is significantly harder.

                      John Curran Ladd
                      1616 Castro Street
                      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                      415-648-9279
                    • Douglas S. Aldrich
                      The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to
                      Message 10 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                         "The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining  to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley"

                        You can not catch the 395 at  615 in Lone Pine arrive at Lee Vining at 0850 and catch the Yart at 940?  Lee Vining is only 2 blocks long


                        Doug


                        From: "Paul Fretheim" <paulfretheim@...>
                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2013 5:43:12 AM
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Transportation Yosemeti to Lone Pine

                         


                        I operate a shuttle service, East Side Sierra Shuttle. We do that run all the time. Fare is $400 for up to two passengers with $80 for additional persons. That is Whitney Portal to Yosemite Valley. The fare from Whitney Portal to Tuolumne Meadows is $ 280 plus $50 for additional passengers after the first 2. It's possible to ride the YARTS bus from Tuolumne to the Valley. Fare was $15 each last season. The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley. Buses do not go to Whitney Portal.

                        Thank you for your interest in our services.

                        Paul Fretheim
                        East Side Sierra Shuttle
                        paul@...
                        760-878-8047
                        http://eastsidesierrashuttle.com

                        On Dec 27, 2013 8:06 PM, <steveddy54@...> wrote:
                         

                        I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.




                      • CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER
                        Last summer I left Lone Pine at 6:00 am and arrived in Yosemite Valley at noon riding the bus all the way. The East Sierra Transit bus drops you in Lee Vining
                        Message 11 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                          Last summer I left Lone Pine at 6:00 am and arrived in Yosemite Valley at noon riding the bus all the way.  The East Sierra Transit bus drops you in Lee Vining about 40 minutes before the YARTS bus to Yosemite Valley comes along.  This is a no hassle way to get to Yosemite.  A few years ago the schedule was such that one had to spend the night in Mammoth and then connect to YARTS early the next morning; no longer though!  

                          The schedules for both East Sierra and YARTS are on line.  Check it out, it's great!

                          Sent from my iPad

                          On Dec 28, 2013, at 11:34 AM, "Douglas S. Aldrich" <dsa@...> wrote:

                           

                           "The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining  to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley"

                          You can not catch the 395 at  615 in Lone Pine arrive at Lee Vining at 0850 and catch the Yart at 940?  Lee Vining is only 2 blocks long


                          Doug


                          From: "Paul Fretheim" <paulfretheim@...>
                          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2013 5:43:12 AM
                          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Transportation Yosemeti to Lone Pine

                           


                          I operate a shuttle service, East Side Sierra Shuttle. We do that run all the time. Fare is $400 for up to two passengers with $80 for additional persons. That is Whitney Portal to Yosemite Valley. The fare from Whitney Portal to Tuolumne Meadows is $ 280 plus $50 for additional passengers after the first 2. It's possible to ride the YARTS bus from Tuolumne to the Valley. Fare was $15 each last season. The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley. Buses do not go to Whitney Portal.

                          Thank you for your interest in our services.

                          Paul Fretheim
                          East Side Sierra Shuttle
                          paul@...
                          760-878-8047
                          http://eastsidesierrashuttle.com

                          On Dec 27, 2013 8:06 PM, <steveddy54@...> wrote:
                           

                          I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.




                        • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                          Good info for next season, Doug, thanks. Ken.
                          Message 12 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                            Good info for next season, Doug, thanks.

                            Ken.


                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Last summer I left Lone Pine at 6:00 am and arrived in Yosemite Valley at noon riding the bus all the way. The East Sierra Transit bus drops you in Lee Vining about 40 minutes before the YARTS bus to Yosemite Valley comes along. This is a no hassle way to get to Yosemite. A few years ago the schedule was such that one had to spend the night in Mammoth and then connect to YARTS early the next morning; no longer though!
                            >
                            > The schedules for both East Sierra and YARTS are on line. Check it out, it's great!
                            >
                            > Sent from my iPad
                            >
                            > > On Dec 28, 2013, at 11:34 AM, "Douglas S. Aldrich" <dsa@...> wrote:
                            >
                          • Bobbie Surber
                            Thanks for the info. A few sites had stated south to north and I was sure this was not correct for JMT. I plan to hike the JMT this summer, have done several
                            Message 13 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                              Thanks for the info. A few sites had stated south to north and I was sure this was not correct for JMT. 

                              I plan to hike the JMT this summer, have done several long distance hikes ( walked about 780  this last trip) in Europe but never a wilderness hike. Excited and also a good case of fear sprinkled in... Thoughts of bears at night and all that! 

                              Anyways, greatful I found this group with so many experienced hikers.

                              Bobbie 


                              On Friday, December 27, 2013, wrote:
                               

                              Bobbie:

                              John Ladd would know for sure (from his survey), but I think 80-90% of people hike north to south, Yosemite to Whitney.


                              Chris.

                              ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <bobbiesurber2012@...> wrote:

                              Still trying to figure out statistically what is the most popular route, north to south or south to north?

                              Thanks! 
                              Bobbie




                              --
                              Thank you,
                               
                              Bobbie
                              Bobbie Surber - LEED AP
                              928 203-6124
                               

                            • Dale Stuart
                              You stated, Getting to Yosemite was easy , but for what you are doing might I suggest, fly into Mammoth instead of SF.  Saves about a day  - Fly to LA,
                              Message 14 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                You stated, "Getting to Yosemite was easy", but for what you are doing might I suggest, fly into Mammoth instead of SF.  Saves about a day  - Fly to LA, connect to Mammoth Lakes -arrives around 5:30 PM, spend the night in Mammoth and catch bus in the morning heading south to Lone Pine and follow other peoples ideas on getting to trail head.

                                -Dale 
                              • Robert
                                I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both
                                Message 15 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                  I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!

                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <steveddy54@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.
                                  >
                                • Paul Fretheim
                                  I don t know. People always tell me they had to spend the night along the way. That s good if it is still true next season. I will have to check those
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                    I don't know. People always tell me they had to spend the night along the way. That's good if it is still true next season. I will have to check those schedules.

                                    Paul

                                    On Dec 28, 2013 10:34 AM, "Douglas S. Aldrich" <dsa@...> wrote:
                                     

                                     "The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining  to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley"

                                    You can not catch the 395 at  615 in Lone Pine arrive at Lee Vining at 0850 and catch the Yart at 940?  Lee Vining is only 2 blocks long


                                    Doug


                                    From: "Paul Fretheim" <paulfretheim@...>
                                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2013 5:43:12 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Transportation Yosemeti to Lone Pine

                                     


                                    I operate a shuttle service, East Side Sierra Shuttle. We do that run all the time. Fare is $400 for up to two passengers with $80 for additional persons. That is Whitney Portal to Yosemite Valley. The fare from Whitney Portal to Tuolumne Meadows is $ 280 plus $50 for additional passengers after the first 2. It's possible to ride the YARTS bus from Tuolumne to the Valley. Fare was $15 each last season. The bus schedules in the Eastern Sierra are such that you have to spend one night in Mammoth or Lee Vining to make connections all the way from Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley. Buses do not go to Whitney Portal.

                                    Thank you for your interest in our services.

                                    Paul Fretheim
                                    East Side Sierra Shuttle
                                    paul@...
                                    760-878-8047
                                    http://eastsidesierrashuttle.com

                                    On Dec 27, 2013 8:06 PM, <steveddy54@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.




                                  • livingstonjohn@att.net
                                    Where in Lee Vining can you park your car securely for 3 plus weeks?
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                      Where in Lee Vining can you park your car securely for 3 plus weeks?

                                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!
                                      >
                                      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <steveddy54@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • robert shattuck
                                      where can you park your car for three plus weeks in lee vining Same question has been asked of Lone Pine and a good way to find out about long term parking
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                        " where can you park your car for three plus weeks in lee vining"

                                        Same question has been asked of Lone Pine and a good way to find out about long term parking options would be to call the LV chamber of commerce. 

                                        760-647-6629

                                        At least that gets answers in LP


                                        Bob

                                        Sent from my iPhone

                                        On Dec 28, 2013, at 7:09 PM, "livingstonjohn@..." <livingstonjohn@...> wrote:

                                         

                                        Where in Lee Vining can you park your car securely for 3 plus weeks?

                                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!
                                        >
                                        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <steveddy54@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.
                                        > >
                                        >

                                      • cehauser1
                                        Robert: You live at an elevation of at least 5000 feet, plus it sounds like you are doing lots of high-altitude hiking throughout the year. Acclimatizing to
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                          Robert:

                                          You live at an elevation of at least 5000 feet, plus it sounds like you are doing lots of high-altitude hiking throughout the year.  Acclimatizing to high altitude is the least of your worries.  For someone like me, who lives at sea level and has no easy access to high mountains, hiking SOBO this summer was a real life saver.  By the time I got to Whitney near the end of my hike, it was almost a walk in the park.


                                          I agree about Yosemite's archaic fax method.  Seems the park service would have a better (online) setup for getting wilderness permits.  I think my first permit request was thrown out because I left a field empty... an online form could prevent that, and make the random selection easier.  Go figure.


                                          Chris.



                                          ---In johnmuirtrail@{{emailDomain}}, <rnperky@...> wrote:

                                          I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!

                                        • brucelem12
                                          My experience the last 2 years has been that Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley (Northbound) is possible in one day w/ YARTS leaving the Mammoth McDonalds/Shilo Inn
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                            My experience the last 2 years has been that Lone Pine to Yosemite Valley (Northbound) is possible in one day w/ YARTS leaving the Mammoth McDonalds/Shilo Inn stop about 10-15 minutes after ESTA arrived at roughly the same location mid morning.
                                            Yosemite to Lone Pine (Southbound) was not possible in one day, since no YARTS bus got to Mammoth before the last ESTA bus left Mammoth southbound, requiring an overnight there in Mammoth.

                                            Of course there is a small possibility the schedules could be significantly different this year when they come out,

                                            Just for documentation's sake:
                                            (YARTS = Yosemite Area Rapid Transit System - Covering Yosemite Valley to Tuolumne Meadows to Lee Vining to Mammoth as one route)
                                            (ESTA = Eastern Sierra Transit Authority - Covering Lone Pine to Independence to Bishop (Seamless bus change in Bishop) to Mammoth as one route (and same bus onward to Le Vining and Reno))

                                            Bruce
                                          • Robert
                                            You can park it at the Mono Lake Visitors Center, or near the Mobile gas station/mini-mart near the YARTS bus stop. When I use the Visitors Center, ( also a
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                              You can park it at the Mono Lake Visitors Center, or near the Mobile gas station/mini-mart near the YARTS bus stop. When I use the Visitors Center, ( also a YARTS stop ), I always let the Rangers at the front desk know, and I haven't ever had any issues.

                                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "livingstonjohn@..." <livingstonjohn@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Where in Lee Vining can you park your car securely for 3 plus weeks?
                                              >
                                              > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@> wrote:
                                              > >
                                              > > I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!
                                              > >
                                              > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <steveddy54@> wrote:
                                              > > >
                                              > > > I am planning on hiking North bound from whitney portal to Yosemeti, Getting to Yosemeti is the easy part, but what transportation options exist to go from Yosemeti to Lone Pine? Ideally in one day.
                                              > > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • Robert
                                              Chris, it definitely helps living at a bit higher altitude, ( 4200 ), but just doing a couple of training hikes at altitude seems to be the most effective
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Dec 28, 2013
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                                                Chris, it definitely helps living at a bit higher altitude, ( 4200' ), but just doing a couple of training hikes at altitude seems to be the most effective method for me. Even doing that, I still will take Diamox if I feel like I haven't had adequate training time at altitude. The best test for me is when I do my annual training hikes up Mt. Rose, ( 10,800' ), and see how my body reacts. It is really random on when I have issues with altitude, but when I do, it changes my whole plan on where I camp at night. FWIW, I have had more successful, full JMT hikes heading SOBO, so there is good reason to believe that is the preferable way to go for acclimation. I am really hoping Yosemite gets with it and goes to a Rec.Gov style of online permit reservations, it would make life much easier for us planners;) !

                                                On another note; do you ever see yourself doing a JMT hike? You look like you have a similar hiking style and pack weight from what I have read here. It's tough to find hiking partners that enjoy higher mileage days and hiking later into evening.

                                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <cehauser1@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Robert:
                                                >
                                                > You live at an elevation of at least 5000 feet, plus it sounds like you are doing lots of high-altitude hiking throughout the year. Acclimatizing to high altitude is the least of your worries. For someone like me, who lives at sea level and has no easy access to high mountains, hiking SOBO this summer was a real life saver. By the time I got to Whitney near the end of my hike, it was almost a walk in the park.
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > I agree about Yosemite's archaic fax method. Seems the park service would have a better (online) setup for getting wilderness permits. I think my first permit request was thrown out because I left a field empty... an online form could prevent that, and make the random selection easier. Go figure.
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > Chris.
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > ---In johnmuirtrail@{{emailDomain}}, <rnperky@> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I am inclined to guess that %80-%90 of folks hike the JMT SOBO, for acclimation purposes and saving Whitney summit for the end of the trip. I have hiked both directions and don't have any reason to sway anyone to do it either way, but for me I usually end up hiking NOBO for logistics. For me, it is easy to drop a vehicle off in Lee Vining, take ESTA or hitch a ride to Lone Pine to start, and take the 5:00PM YARTS bus out of Yosemite back to my car in Lee Vining when I'm finished. I live in the Reno/Sparks area and it always feels like I'm walking towards home this way. Many fastpackers prefer to go NOBO as well for the reason you stated; getting the harder passes done first while fresh. I subscribe to that view as well, but I do plenty of high altitude hiking BEFORE attempting that to toughen up my feet and get my hiking legs and lungs ready. I have had better luck getting my permits from Inyo, (Whitney Portal ), than Yosemites archaic fax-in method. I know the TH options such as Illiouette and Glacier Point, but prefer the very limited Happy Ilses pass-through option which, for me, has been VERY hard to come by. Best of luck on your hike whichever direction you end up going!
                                                >
                                              • brucelem12
                                                The northbound/southbound preference is of course very subjective. Everybody has their own priorities/biases, but I’ll add my own impressions for
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Dec 29, 2013
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                                                  The northbound/southbound preference is of course very subjective. Everybody has their own priorities/biases, but I’ll add my own impressions for consideration.
                                                  I find going southbound much more preferable for 2 primary reasons:
                                                  - First, as often noted, the gradually escalating drama/intensity/elevation/exposure of the terrain from N to S makes for correspondingly greater escalation of wow factor and anticipation in my opinion. Certainly still a subjective preference for delayed gratification even if the subjective escalating wow is granted.
                                                  - Second, since the majority of hikers are going south, a northbound hike makes the trail seem much more crowded to me, in that I cross paths with more people by a factor of perhaps 3. This is contradictory to John’s take, (that northbound seems to offer more solitude since one isn’t in the flow/hiking in unison w/ others and therefore more prone to ongoing conversation), certainly a valid point, which highlights the subjectivity.
                                                  Bruce
                                                • Robert
                                                  Going NOBO does indeed make the trail seem busier to me as well, which is a mixed bag for me. I like that I have run into several fellow Trailjournalists and
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Dec 29, 2013
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                                                    Going NOBO does indeed make the trail seem busier to me as well, which is a 'mixed bag' for me. I like that I have run into several fellow Trailjournalists and JMT Yahoo-ers over the years, but it can be a major annoyance when you run into so many people in certain sections and the overall lack of trail etiquette that exists on the JMT, ie; not yielding to uphill hikers, picking up trash, saying hello, ect..

                                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, brucelem12 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > The northbound/southbound preference is of course very subjective. Everybody has their own priorities/biases, but I’ll add my own impressions for consideration.
                                                    > I find going southbound much more preferable for 2 primary reasons:
                                                    > - First, as often noted, the gradually escalating drama/intensity/elevation/exposure of the terrain from N to S makes for correspondingly greater escalation of wow factor and anticipation in my opinion. Certainly still a subjective preference for delayed gratification even if the subjective escalating wow is granted.
                                                    > - Second, since the majority of hikers are going south, a northbound hike makes the trail seem much more crowded to me, in that I cross paths with more people by a factor of perhaps 3. This is contradictory to John’s take, (that northbound seems to offer more solitude since one isn’t in the flow/hiking in unison w/ others and therefore more prone to ongoing conversation), certainly a valid point, which highlights the subjectivity.
                                                    > Bruce
                                                    >
                                                  • cehauser1
                                                    Robert: Sounds like you have a great strategy for dealing with altitude. Diamox might offer the option of hiking NOBO for someone who is concerned about high
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Dec 29, 2013
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                                                      Robert:

                                                      Sounds like you have a great strategy for dealing with altitude.  Diamox might offer the option of hiking NOBO for someone who is concerned about high altitudes at the very start of the trail.  Lots to consider, when deciding between NOBO and SOBO.


                                                      Yes, your comment reminded me that Yosemite NP use the Recreation.gov website to allocate camp site reservations for all their car-campgrounds.  Seems like they could easily set up something under that same website for the wilderness permits.


                                                      If you are asking to hike the JMT with me... thank you very much!  I've recently subscribed to many of the ideas listed in the book "Ultralight Backpackin' Tips" by Mike Clelland, so that would give some idea of my (new) backpacking style, if you've read the book.  I did hike the JMT this summer, along with the High Sierra Trail, and really had a blast.  However, before my trip there was some discussion on this list of how crowded the JMT is becoming (which has some truth to it), and I really want to see new trails (and less crowded trails), so I decided I would not hike the JMT again for several years.  I'm probably going to try to section-hike the PCT before I come around to hiking the JMT again.  Thanks though!


                                                      Happy new year,


                                                      Chris.



                                                       



                                                      ---In johnmuirtrail@{{emailDomain}}, <rnperky@...> wrote:

                                                      Chris, it definitely helps living at a bit higher altitude, ( 4200' ), but just doing a couple of training hikes at altitude seems to be the most effective method for me. Even doing that, I still will take Diamox if I feel like I haven't had adequate training time at altitude. The best test for me is when I do my annual training hikes up Mt. Rose, ( 10,800' ), and see how my body reacts. It is really random on when I have issues with altitude, but when I do, it changes my whole plan on where I camp at night. FWIW, I have had more successful, full JMT hikes heading SOBO, so there is good reason to believe that is the preferable way to go for acclimation. I am really hoping Yosemite gets with it and goes to a Rec.Gov style of online permit reservations, it would make life much easier for us planners;) !

                                                      On another note; do you ever see yourself doing a JMT hike? You look like you have a similar hiking style and pack weight from what I have read here. It's tough to find hiking partners that enjoy higher mileage days and hiking later into evening.

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