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My Big 3- suggestions/comments?

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  • allison1288
    I ll be hiking the JMT next July and I m updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
      I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.

      Tent:
      Tarptent Contrail
      1+ person 24.5 oz $199
      http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html

      Sleeping Bag:
      Western Mountaineering Summerlite
      32 degree temperature rating
      1.3 lbs
      about $340
      http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69

      Pack:
      Gossamer Mariposa
      27 oz $177
      4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
      35 lb max carry capacity
      http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
    • CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER
      You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If
      Message 2 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
        You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite.  I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights.  If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable.  I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude.  I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite.  To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.

        However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds.  My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical.  But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.

        I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation.  I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek.  The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive.  I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid.  Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings.  I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.

        I have had no experience with the Mariposa.  I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer.  I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food.  Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed.  The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended).  Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais.  The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack.  At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.

        Sent from my iPad

        On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:

         

        I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.

        Tent:
        Tarptent Contrail
        1+ person 24.5 oz $199
        http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html

        Sleeping Bag:
        Western Mountaineering Summerlite
        32 degree temperature rating
        1.3 lbs
        about $340
        http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69

        Pack:
        Gossamer Mariposa
        27 oz $177
        4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
        35 lb max carry capacity
        http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html

      • Shawn Peterson
        I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or
        Message 3 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
          I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt.  For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak 

          On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C   KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@...> wrote:

           

          You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite.  I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights.  If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable.  I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude.  I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite.  To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.

          However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds.  My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical.  But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.

          I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation.  I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek.  The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive.  I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid.  Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings.  I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.

          I have had no experience with the Mariposa.  I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer.  I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food.  Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed.  The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended).  Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais.  The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack.  At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.

          Sent from my iPad

          On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:

           

          I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.

          Tent:
          Tarptent Contrail
          1+ person 24.5 oz $199
          http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html

          Sleeping Bag:
          Western Mountaineering Summerlite
          32 degree temperature rating
          1.3 lbs
          about $340
          http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69

          Pack:
          Gossamer Mariposa
          27 oz $177
          4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
          35 lb max carry capacity
          http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html

        • allison1288
          Thanks for the suggestion! I ve heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I m almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for
          Message 4 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
            Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@...> wrote:
            >
            > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
            >
            > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
            > >
            > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
            > >
            > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
            > >
            > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
            > >
            > > Sent from my iPad
            > >
            > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
            > >>
            > >>
            > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
            > >>
            > >> Tent:
            > >> Tarptent Contrail
            > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
            > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
            > >>
            > >> Sleeping Bag:
            > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
            > >> 32 degree temperature rating
            > >> 1.3 lbs
            > >> about $340
            > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
            > >>
            > >> Pack:
            > >> Gossamer Mariposa
            > >> 27 oz $177
            > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
            > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
            > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            >
          • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
            I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out
            Message 5 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
              I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

              Ken.

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
              >
              > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
              > >
              > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
              > > >
              > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
              > > >
              > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
              > > >
              > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
              > > >
              > > > Sent from my iPad
              > > >
              > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
              > > >>
              > > >> Tent:
              > > >> Tarptent Contrail
              > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
              > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
              > > >>
              > > >> Sleeping Bag:
              > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
              > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
              > > >> 1.3 lbs
              > > >> about $340
              > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
              > > >>
              > > >> Pack:
              > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
              > > >> 27 oz $177
              > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
              > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
              > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
              > > >>
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • mick.parker997tt
              I have moved to an Enlighted Designs Revelation Quilt and love it! Easier to regulate body temp, much easier for side sleepers who toss and turn, not
              Message 6 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013

                 I have moved to an Enlighted Designs Revelation Quilt and love it!  Easier to regulate body temp, much easier for side sleepers who toss and turn, not confining, and fairly light vs. mummy bags.  They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive.  



                ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <kenjessett@...> wrote:

                I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

                Ken.

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                >
                > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                > >
                > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                > > >
                > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                > > >
                > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                > > >
                > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                > > >
                > > > Sent from my iPad
                > > >
                > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                > > >>
                > > >>
                > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                > > >>
                > > >> Tent:
                > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                > > >>
                > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                > > >> 1.3 lbs
                > > >> about $340
                > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                > > >>
                > > >> Pack:
                > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                > > >> 27 oz $177
                > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                > > >>
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • allison1288
                Ken I have the sub Kilo as well. Looking to lighten up. I like mine, but as with you I turn and have to carefully adjust to my side. I also had to get the
                Message 7 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
                  Ken I have the sub Kilo as well. Looking to lighten up. I like mine, but as with you I turn and have to carefully adjust to my side. I also had to get the zipper fixed, but since I bought it at REI it was a free repair.

                  The adjusting during the night doesn't affect me too much but I am looking at warmth for the price and weight so it seems like quilts are the way to go.

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "kennethjessett@..." <kenjessett@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?
                  >
                  > Ken.
                  >
                  > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                  > >
                  > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                  > > >
                  > > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Sent from my iPad
                  > > > >
                  > > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >> Tent:
                  > > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                  > > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                  > > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                  > > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                  > > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                  > > > >> 1.3 lbs
                  > > > >> about $340
                  > > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >> Pack:
                  > > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                  > > > >> 27 oz $177
                  > > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                  > > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                  > > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                  > > > >>
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                  They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive. No kidding! $415??? As for tents/tarps, I m also considering the
                  Message 8 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
                    "They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive." No kidding! $415???

                    As for tents/tarps, I'm also considering the Tarptent Contrail, which I suppose at $200 isn't too bad. I just wish I don't have so much money invested in gear already. :-(

                    Ken.

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <mick.parker997tt@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have moved to an Enlighted Designs Revelation Quilt and love it! Easier to regulate body temp, much easier for side sleepers who toss and turn, not confining, and fairly light vs. mummy bags. They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive.
                    >
                  • Kim Fishburn
                    I haven t been looking at new gear, but if I was I d be looking to see if anyone is producing sleeping bags with waterproof down, or a new synthetic that is
                    Message 9 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
                      I haven't been looking at new gear, but if I was I'd be looking to see if anyone is producing sleeping bags with waterproof down, or a new synthetic that is very compressible. It might be best to wait awhile before purchasing anything as there might still be something coming out next year.

                      Kim


                      On Fri, Nov 29, 2013 at 3:01 PM, kennethjessett@... <kenjessett@...> wrote:
                       

                      "They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive." No kidding! $415???

                      As for tents/tarps, I'm also considering the Tarptent Contrail, which I suppose at $200 isn't too bad. I just wish I don't have so much money invested in gear already. :-(

                      Ken.

                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <mick.parker997tt@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I have moved to an Enlighted Designs Revelation Quilt and love it! Easier to regulate body temp, much easier for side sleepers who toss and turn, not confining, and fairly light vs. mummy bags. They have a new model I think called the Enigma that is super light, but VERY expensive.
                      >


                    • Joe MacLeish
                      Allison: I did two JMTs with my Contrail and got soaked from condensation both times. I finally sold it and am now using a Lightheart Solong6 which is about
                      Message 10 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013

                        Allison:

                        I did two JMTs with my Contrail and got soaked from condensation both times.  I finally sold it and am now using a Lightheart Solong6 which is about 75% double wall, is huge, and weighs 1 lb 8 oz complete with pegs and carry bag (I don't use a footprint).  The Contrail is a neat tent but does get condensation for sure if you get caught in a Sierra monsoon.

                        Joe

                         

                        From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of allison1288
                        Sent: Friday, November 29, 2013 6:15 AM
                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?

                         

                         

                        I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.

                        Tent:
                        Tarptent Contrail
                        1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                        http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html

                        Sleeping Bag:
                        Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                        32 degree temperature rating
                        1.3 lbs
                        about $340
                        http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69

                        Pack:
                        Gossamer Mariposa
                        27 oz $177
                        4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                        35 lb max carry capacity
                        http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html

                      • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                        I ve just taken a look at the Lightheart Solo - Standard which weighs in at 1lb 11ozs - about 2lbs lighter than my Sierra Design solo tent. With seam sealing
                        Message 11 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
                          I've just taken a look at the Lightheart Solo - Standard which weighs in at 1lb 11ozs - about 2lbs lighter than my Sierra Design solo tent. With seam sealing and postage it will be about $250, so it's pricey, but in the drive for lightness, maybe worth it?

                          Ken.

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Allison:
                          >
                          > I did two JMTs with my Contrail and got soaked from condensation both times.
                          > I finally sold it and am now using a Lightheart Solong6 which is about 75%
                          > double wall, is huge, and weighs 1 lb 8 oz complete with pegs and carry bag
                          > (I don't use a footprint). The Contrail is a neat tent but does get
                          > condensation for sure if you get caught in a Sierra monsoon.
                          >
                          > Joe
                          >
                        • Jim Seamans
                          Hi, I would like to throw in my own opinion based on my experiences and an evolution of gear purchases. I stared shifting to light weight packing about five
                          Message 12 of 24 , Nov 29, 2013
                            Hi, I would like to throw in my own opinion based on my experiences and an evolution of gear purchases.  I stared shifting to light weight packing about five years ago and i'm content with my current gear.
                            TENT: I own a big agnes fly creek 1 it was my first light tent and its good but still about two pounds.  I have been using a zpacks hexamid solo for several years and i'm extremely happy with it.  It weighs about a pound "all in" and the newest versions have several improvements.  

                            sleeping bag: I own two of montbells super spiral down hugger bags, the 30 degree is about 20 oz. and easily warm to thirty.  Add some clothes and you could go colder.  Again zpack wins out with my current choice, a 30 degree bag under one pound that is truly warm. It does not have a hood and is designed to be used in a similar fashion as a quilt also.  Look it up and read about it, other than cost I don't know why any one would buy something else.

                            PACK: Gossamer Gears Mariposa gets my vote.  I have not had the pleasure of trying other light weight packs except for zpacks ( I like zpacks and they are very light but for me they are not the most comfortable on longer trips)  I have used the mariposa on at least a dozen trips of one week or longer and I wish it could be about 8 oz lighter, but I love it.
                            I hope this is helpful   jim


                            On Fri, Nov 29, 2013 at 6:54 PM, kennethjessett@... <kenjessett@...> wrote:
                             

                            I've just taken a look at the Lightheart Solo - Standard which weighs in at 1lb 11ozs - about 2lbs lighter than my Sierra Design solo tent. With seam sealing and postage it will be about $250, so it's pricey, but in the drive for lightness, maybe worth it?

                            Ken.


                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Allison:
                            >
                            > I did two JMTs with my Contrail and got soaked from condensation both times.
                            > I finally sold it and am now using a Lightheart Solong6 which is about 75%
                            > double wall, is huge, and weighs 1 lb 8 oz complete with pegs and carry bag
                            > (I don't use a footprint). The Contrail is a neat tent but does get
                            > condensation for sure if you get caught in a Sierra monsoon.
                            >
                            > Joe
                            >


                          • brucelem12
                            +1 re Tarptent Contrail comments. I do like the well designed bathtub floor which holds a nice crisp shape well, the nice wide clearances between tub and
                            Message 13 of 24 , Nov 30, 2013

                              +1 re Tarptent Contrail comments. I do like the well designed bathtub floor which holds a nice crisp shape well, the nice wide clearances between tub and perimeter, and the head entry which allows one to scootch head out for star gazing, but I highly recommend getting the short additional foot end pole (or using a stick) in rainy conditions, as the pitch form is somewhat flattish/doesn't shed water as well as most tents even w/ it. I would tend to avoid that tent in rain intense climates, though fine for the Sierra.

                              I have switched to the (admittedly expensive) Zpacks Hexamid since it's just lighter than any other full enclosure out there that I'm aware of. More condensation adjustability. Need to be a little more careful about setting it up correctly...I've gotten wet by being sloppy about that. Can't imagine not getting it without the beak. Can be a little tight in vertical clearance at head/foot at standard size for a 5-10 and up person w/ thick mattress. One thing I like about it is that I can use the tent as a bug screen topped bivy for a cowboy camping feel, but all staked out and ready to pop up if rain is possible by just raising the pole and moving 1 or 2 stakes. I keep seeing and hearing of people using these more and more...seems to be getting very popular. I like it a lot.

                              Both tents have quite large footprints.


                              Bearikade's are also very expensive, but that's one of those gear items that doesn't have quite as many nuances/personal preference variations, so mostly the only risk of ongoing gear upgrade syndrome is sizing choice. In my opinion, Bearikade also has the most clean/efficient food jamming shape/lid per overall size. Does have sharper edges though.


                              I think there were some posts about 1-3 months ago re WM summerlite, Hilite, etc.


                              I'll be interested to hear about the Mariposa, as that's a possible on my short list for the future.


                              Bruce





                              ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:

                              I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.

                              Tent:
                              Tarptent Contrail
                              1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                              http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html

                              Sleeping Bag:
                              Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                              32 degree temperature rating
                              1.3 lbs
                              about $340
                              http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69

                              Pack:
                              Gossamer Mariposa
                              27 oz $177
                              4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                              35 lb max carry capacity
                              http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                            • Robert
                              Tarptent - I have no experience with the Contrail, but have used the TT Moment for several years and it is a great tent. Literally can be set up in a minute
                              Message 14 of 24 , Dec 1 8:33 PM
                                Tarptent - I have no experience with the Contrail, but have used the TT Moment for several years and it is a great tent. Literally can be set up in a minute after some practice, but did get condensation as others have mentioned. Condensation comes with the territory with single-wall tents. I have switched to the Heximid Solo with extended beak to save the weight, and LOVE it. It does get condensation, though less than the TT Moment, and it runs down the sides and into the ground, so it isn't an issue. You will need to practice set up on the Hexamid before heading out, but is easy once you practice and is storm worthy as well, if staked out properly.

                                WM Summerlight - This has been my go-to bag for four years on the JMT. It is, in my opinion, the perfect temp rated bag for summer Sierra hiking. It is cut narrow to minimize internal space required to warm up. The mistake many make is wearing too much in their bags which can compress the down on a narrow bag and having the opposite intended effect by the user of adding warmth. The key with down bags and quilts is loft. The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat anyways, so the hood on any sleeping bag is kind of wasted on me anyways.

                                I haven't tried the backpack you are thinking of, but highly recommend Zimmerbuilt custom packs. Reasonably priced, get it built with what you need, not what major retailers market, and Chris is just a great guy to work with on building your pack. He built mine based on what I liked about a couple of previous packs I owned, ULA Conduit, and SMD Swift and Starlight.

                                I'll second whoever mentioned renting or buying the Bearikade as your food storage.

                                Have a great hike next summer!


                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                >
                                > Tent:
                                > Tarptent Contrail
                                > 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                > http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                >
                                > Sleeping Bag:
                                > Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                > 32 degree temperature rating
                                > 1.3 lbs
                                > about $340
                                > http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                >
                                > Pack:
                                > Gossamer Mariposa
                                > 27 oz $177
                                > 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                > 35 lb max carry capacity
                                > http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                >
                              • Lynn Alexander
                                I too am a side sleeper who moves around a lot at night. I have a quilt custom made to my specs from Nunatek and I love it! When I get too hot I can stick a
                                Message 15 of 24 , Dec 1 8:56 PM

                                  I too am a side sleeper who moves around a lot at night. I have a quilt custom made to my specs from Nunatek and I love it! When I get too hot I can stick a foot out until I cool off. I can turn from side to side every hour all night and stay warm and comfy. I got extra overfill down (don't remember how much), and have been fine down to a hard freeze (1.5 liter full water bottle was frozen solid in the morning).
                                  Lynn

                                  On Nov 29, 2013 10:42 AM, "kennethjessett@..." <kenjessett@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

                                  Ken.

                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                                  >
                                  > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                                  > >
                                  > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Sent from my iPad
                                  > > >
                                  > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >> Tent:
                                  > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                                  > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                  > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                                  > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                  > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                                  > > >> 1.3 lbs
                                  > > >> about $340
                                  > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >> Pack:
                                  > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                                  > > >> 27 oz $177
                                  > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                  > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                                  > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                  > > >>
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >

                                • Joe MacLeish
                                  Is there something under you besides the air mattress? It s just the air mattress and this quilt thingy flung over you and it s as warm as my 20 degree sub
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Dec 1 9:42 PM

                                    Is there something under you besides the air mattress?  It's just the air mattress and  this quilt thingy flung over you and it's as warm as my 20 degree sub kilo?  And how much does it weigh again?   it seems like it would be a bit drafty.

                                    Joe

                                     

                                    From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lynn Alexander
                                    Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2013 8:56 PM
                                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?

                                     

                                     

                                    I too am a side sleeper who moves around a lot at night. I have a quilt custom made to my specs from Nunatek and I love it! When I get too hot I can stick a foot out until I cool off. I can turn from side to side every hour all night and stay warm and comfy. I got extra overfill down (don't remember how much), and have been fine down to a hard freeze (1.5 liter full water bottle was frozen solid in the morning).
                                    Lynn

                                    On Nov 29, 2013 10:42 AM, "kennethjessett@..." <kenjessett@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

                                    Ken.

                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                                    >
                                    > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                                    > >
                                    > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Sent from my iPad
                                    > > >
                                    > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >> Tent:
                                    > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                                    > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                    > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                                    > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                    > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                                    > > >> 1.3 lbs
                                    > > >> about $340
                                    > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >> Pack:
                                    > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                                    > > >> 27 oz $177
                                    > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                    > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                                    > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                    > > >>
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >

                                  • Lynn Alexander
                                    Just the air mattress. It is big enough to hang over the sides & if I want, to tuck under the air mattress by a few inches, which I only do when it is really
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Dec 1 10:02 PM

                                      Just the air mattress. It is big enough to hang over the sides & if I want, to tuck under the air mattress by a few inches, which I only do when it is really cold. No it's not drafty, except when I get too hot and stick a foot, or a knee out. I have had it several years and don't recall the exact weight, close to 17 oz I think. Nunatek made a down hat thingy to wear when it gets cold. It looks funny, like a conehead shape, but it Velcro's under my chin, covers my forehead, head and back of my neck, and is super warm, and comfortable, and easy to turn over with.
                                      Lynn

                                      On Dec 1, 2013 9:43 PM, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Is there something under you besides the air mattress?  It's just the air mattress and  this quilt thingy flung over you and it's as warm as my 20 degree sub kilo?  And how much does it weigh again?   it seems like it would be a bit drafty.

                                      Joe

                                       

                                      From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lynn Alexander
                                      Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2013 8:56 PM
                                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?

                                       

                                       

                                      I too am a side sleeper who moves around a lot at night. I have a quilt custom made to my specs from Nunatek and I love it! When I get too hot I can stick a foot out until I cool off. I can turn from side to side every hour all night and stay warm and comfy. I got extra overfill down (don't remember how much), and have been fine down to a hard freeze (1.5 liter full water bottle was frozen solid in the morning).
                                      Lynn

                                      On Nov 29, 2013 10:42 AM, "kennethjessett@..." <kenjessett@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

                                      Ken.

                                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                                      >
                                      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                                      > >
                                      > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Sent from my iPad
                                      > > >
                                      > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >> Tent:
                                      > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                                      > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                      > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                                      > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                      > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                                      > > >> 1.3 lbs
                                      > > >> about $340
                                      > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >> Pack:
                                      > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                                      > > >> 27 oz $177
                                      > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                      > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                                      > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                      > > >>
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >

                                    • rob kuhn
                                      I also use a quilt, I would never go back to a mummy bag. Quilts are becoming a great option for people who don t sleep on there backs. Most have design
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Dec 1 11:24 PM
                                        I also use a quilt, I would never go back to a mummy bag. Quilts are becoming a great option for people who don't sleep on there backs. Most have design features that prevent drafts.

                                        My quilt has elastic straps that attach it to my pad. I sleep on my pad directly as it has a sufficient R value to handle most three season conditions. Once attached, I can roll around all night without shifting the quilt or the pad. When it's cold, I tuck the quilt around me, but often I just let it fall however and it is fun inside of my tent. The down contained on the bottom side of a mummy bag does not provide considerable warmth when it is compressed beneath your body. As a result, you mostly end up paying for extra materials that provide little benefit. That being said, I imagine it does provide some amount of warmth and it also provides a later between your body and the pad. I happen to like the natural on the top part of my pad.

                                        The quilt is designed with a taper, it's not just a square like a duvet. The bottom end zips and saps together to provide a foot box. There is a toggle cord at the ver bottom to cinch the material tight and prevent drafts.

                                        I really like my quilt. It is rated to 10 degrees and has 800 fill power. Because of the versatility, I use this in all but the warmest summer treks (above 70f at night). If warm, I stick a foot out. I also appreciate being able to wrap myself in the quilt when I am hanging out in camp, though I try to minimize that as it exposes it to a lot of different risks.

                                        Depending in the maker, you can get a good deal. Nunatek (mentioned above) makes a great product but is out of my price range. I did score a deal, but I managed to get a 10 degree, 800 fill power quilt that weighs 28 oz. for only 180. I consider that a steal and it brings me a bit of a smile every time I wrap myself into it.

                                        WM makes great bags, I'm sure it will spot you well if you go with it. The weight seems good and it is lighter than mine by 9 oz. I happen to find mummy bags pretty constricting and never slept well inside if them. I sleep warm so I like having easy venting as I usually need it.

                                        Unfortunately, I don't have experience with the other items. One thing I would caution, is to think about your sleeping pad. I know the sleeping bag is one of the big three, but a heavy pad can eat into weight savings. My goal was to get my sleeping bag + pad at under three. Between a week of monitoring pads on ebay, and some time researching quilts, I was excited to succeed.

                                        If you're interested in quilts, you should google search them. There are a number of forums that have a wealth of information on the subject. As most if the producers are cottage shops, it's common to see the people who make the quilt contribute as well.

                                        Good luck with your search, I hope you get gear that will make you happy and suit your needs :)

                                        -Rob


                                        -Rob


                                        From: Lynn Alexander <drlynnalexander@...>;
                                        To: <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>;
                                        Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?
                                        Sent: Mon, Dec 2, 2013 6:02:07 AM

                                         

                                        Just the air mattress. It is big enough to hang over the sides & if I want, to tuck under the air mattress by a few inches, which I only do when it is really cold. No it's not drafty, except when I get too hot and stick a foot, or a knee out. I have had it several years and don't recall the exact weight, close to 17 oz I think. Nunatek made a down hat thingy to wear when it gets cold. It looks funny, like a conehead shape, but it Velcro's under my chin, covers my forehead, head and back of my neck, and is super warm, and comfortable, and easy to turn over with.
                                        Lynn

                                        On Dec 1, 2013 9:43 PM, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        Is there something under you besides the air mattress?  It's just the air mattress and  this quilt thingy flung over you and it's as warm as my 20 degree sub kilo?  And how much does it weigh again?   it seems like it would be a bit drafty.

                                        Joe

                                         

                                        From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lynn Alexander
                                        Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2013 8:56 PM
                                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?

                                         

                                         

                                        I too am a side sleeper who moves around a lot at night. I have a quilt custom made to my specs from Nunatek and I love it! When I get too hot I can stick a foot out until I cool off. I can turn from side to side every hour all night and stay warm and comfy. I got extra overfill down (don't remember how much), and have been fine down to a hard freeze (1.5 liter full water bottle was frozen solid in the morning).
                                        Lynn

                                        On Nov 29, 2013 10:42 AM, "kennethjessett@..." <kenjessett@...> wrote:

                                         

                                        I have a sub kilo +20 mummy bag and since I toss and turn all night (I travel all over our king sized bed at home)I get trapped inside the bag like a wrung out dish cloth and have frequent fights to extricate myself throughout the night and I'm wondering how a quilt will work in such a situation. I can see me throwing the quilt off constantly, but at least I won't be tangled and held hostage. Any experiences from those who are also night travellers?

                                        Ken.

                                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Thanks for the suggestion! I've heard quilts are the way to go. The tent I'm almost 100% sure of as well as the pack. The sleeping bag is a tough choice for me. I've also looked in the Golite quilts. I'm a warm sleeper and I do plan on wearing long underwear to bed.
                                        >
                                        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > I would recommend ditching the bag and buying a quilt. For the sane money, less weight, and 20 degree rating you can pick up a nice quilt from Katabatic or have a really nice one made from Nunatak
                                        > >
                                        > > > On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:30 AM, "CHARLES C KATHLEEN GRIER" <jkgrier@> wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > > You might want to consider a warmer bag than the Summerlite. I have used mine several times on parts of the JMT and have had more than a few cold nights. If you are prepared to wear a lot of clothing to sleep in one can stay warm to a bit below freezing but, because of the snug fit of the bag, wearing a lot of clothing in the Summerlite is not particularly comfortable. I prefer my Marmot Helium to the Summerlite especially for use at higher altitude. I have one of the older Heliums with a half zipper; it weighs 28 oz or 7 oz more than my Summerlite with 2 oz of overfill. The Helium is warm to about 15-20 degrees and is much roomier than is the Summerlite. To me, the warmth and room are worth the small weight penalty.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > However, I am a 75 year old guy, 5' 9" tall and 160 pounds. My internal furnace does not burn as hot as it once did so my experience with the Summerlite may not be typical. But, I have heard several others claim that the Summerlite is a good bag for temperatures above 40 degrees but can be cold below that.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > I have used the Contrail and found it to be a good shelter but prone to condensation. I now use either a Zpacks Hexamid or a Big Agnes Fly Creek. The Hexamid complete with extended beak, stakes and ground cloth weighs less than a pound but is expensive. I'm walking the JMT next August and will use the Hexamid. Condensation is also an issue with the "Hex" but I can deal with it for the weight savings. I have never had condensation with the Fly Creek but it is small and weighs a little over 2 lb.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > I have had no experience with the Mariposa. I used an Elemental Horizons Kalais on the JMT last summer. I used a BV-500 which was a tight fit in the Kalais but I managed to get all the gear in with a full load of food. Then, I would move gear into the BV as food was consumed. The Kalais weighs about 30 oz with the aluminum stay (recommended). Elemental Horizons also makes the Aquilo which is a roomier version of the Kalais. The Kalais and Aquilo have the same suspension system which is, IMO, the most comfortable suspension I have used with a light-weight pack. At any rate, I suggest you look at the EH packs before you decide.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Sent from my iPad
                                        > > >
                                        > > >> On Nov 29, 2013, at 7:15 AM, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >> I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >> Tent:
                                        > > >> Tarptent Contrail
                                        > > >> 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                        > > >> http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >> Sleeping Bag:
                                        > > >> Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                        > > >> 32 degree temperature rating
                                        > > >> 1.3 lbs
                                        > > >> about $340
                                        > > >> http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >> Pack:
                                        > > >> Gossamer Mariposa
                                        > > >> 27 oz $177
                                        > > >> 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                        > > >> 35 lb max carry capacity
                                        > > >> http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                        > > >>
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        >

                                      • ravi_jmt2013
                                        The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Dec 2 6:55 AM
                                          "The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat anyways, so the hood on any sleeping bag is kind of wasted on me anyways."

                                          I've been thinking about doing the same thing but decided to stick with my Marmot Helium for the upcoming year.  zPacks has a $25 off sale through end of today on packs and bags.


                                          ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <rnperky@...> wrote:

                                          Tarptent - I have no experience with the Contrail, but have used the TT Moment for several years and it is a great tent. Literally can be set up in a minute after some practice, but did get condensation as others have mentioned. Condensation comes with the territory with single-wall tents. I have switched to the Heximid Solo with extended beak to save the weight, and LOVE it. It does get condensation, though less than the TT Moment, and it runs down the sides and into the ground, so it isn't an issue. You will need to practice set up on the Hexamid before heading out, but is easy once you practice and is storm worthy as well, if staked out properly.

                                          WM Summerlight - This has been my go-to bag for four years on the JMT. It is, in my opinion, the perfect temp rated bag for summer Sierra hiking. It is cut narrow to minimize internal space required to warm up. The mistake many make is wearing too much in their bags which can compress the down on a narrow bag and having the opposite intended effect by the user of adding warmth. The key with down bags and quilts is loft. The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat anyways, so the hood on any sleeping bag is kind of wasted on me anyways.

                                          I haven't tried the backpack you are thinking of, but highly recommend Zimmerbuilt custom packs. Reasonably priced, get it built with what you need, not what major retailers market, and Chris is just a great guy to work with on building your pack. He built mine based on what I liked about a couple of previous packs I owned, ULA Conduit, and SMD Swift and Starlight.

                                          I'll second whoever mentioned renting or buying the Bearikade as your food storage.

                                          Have a great hike next summer!


                                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                          >
                                          > Tent:
                                          > Tarptent Contrail
                                          > 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                          > http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                          >
                                          > Sleeping Bag:
                                          > Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                          > 32 degree temperature rating
                                          > 1.3 lbs
                                          > about $340
                                          > http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                          >
                                          > Pack:
                                          > Gossamer Mariposa
                                          > 27 oz $177
                                          > 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                          > 35 lb max carry capacity
                                          > http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                          >
                                        • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                                          I am a little confused about quilts. The pictures I see of the various sites recommended all seem to show a tube of quilting rather that a single flat piece
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Dec 2 10:04 AM
                                            I am a little confused about quilts. The pictures I see of the various sites recommended all seem to show a 'tube' of quilting rather that a single flat piece - which is what I think of as a quilt.

                                            Are the camping quilts like the quilts you put on the bed, or a bag with open ends?

                                            Ken.
                                          • rob kuhn
                                            Ken, A quilt used for camping is like a hybrid mixture of a sleeping bag and a bed quilt. Most quilts are capable of laying flat, but they are
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Dec 2 10:18 AM
                                              Ken,

                                              A quilt used for camping is like a hybrid mixture of a sleeping bag and a bed quilt. Most quilts are capable of laying flat, but they are typically cut with a taper. From there, the method of closure varies by maker. My quilt has a zipper in the foot box that allows the bottom 6 inches to connect. There is also an elastic cinch to secure the end of the material and keep out drafts. At the top of my quilt, there is a clasp that allows me to close it around my neck if I want.

                                              There is a bit of variety though, I know that some quilts have a seen foot box that prevents the quilt from lying flat. I hope that helps.

                                              -Rob

                                              Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


                                              From: kennethjessett@... <kenjessett@...>;
                                              To: <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>;
                                              Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] My Big 3- suggestions/comments?
                                              Sent: Mon, Dec 2, 2013 6:04:57 PM

                                               

                                              I am a little confused about quilts. The pictures I see of the various sites recommended all seem to show a 'tube' of quilting rather that a single flat piece - which is what I think of as a quilt.

                                              Are the camping quilts like the quilts you put on the bed, or a bag with open ends?

                                              Ken.

                                            • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
                                              Thanks Rob.
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Dec 2 2:38 PM
                                                Thanks Rob.

                                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, rob kuhn <jmtorbust@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Ken, <br/><br/>A quilt used for camping is like a hybrid mixture of a sleeping bag and a bed quilt. Most quilts are capable of laying flat, but they are typically cut with a taper. From there, the method of closure varies by maker. My quilt has a zipper in the foot box that allows the bottom 6 inches to connect. There is also an elastic cinch to secure the end of the material and keep out drafts. At the top of my quilt, there is a clasp that allows me to close it around my neck if I want. <br/><br/>There is a bit of variety though, I know that some quilts have a seen foot box that prevents the quilt from lying flat. I hope that helps.<br/><br/>-Rob<a href="http://overview.mail.yahoo.com?.src=iOS"><br/><br/>Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone</a>
                                                >
                                              • Robert
                                                Thanks for the heads-up on the Z-Pack bag Ravi! I ve been thinking about it hard, but Christmas spending has made a dent in the pocketbook already the last
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Dec 2 4:40 PM
                                                  Thanks for the heads-up on the Z-Pack bag Ravi! I've been thinking about it hard, but Christmas spending has made a dent in the pocketbook already the last couple of days;) !

                                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ravi@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > "The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat anyways, so the hood on any sleeping bag is kind of wasted on me anyways."
                                                  >
                                                  > I've been thinking about doing the same thing but decided to stick with my Marmot Helium for the upcoming year. zPacks has a $25 off sale through end of today on packs and bags.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <rnperky@> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > Tarptent - I have no experience with the Contrail, but have used the TT Moment for several years and it is a great tent. Literally can be set up in a minute after some practice, but did get condensation as others have mentioned. Condensation comes with the territory with single-wall tents. I have switched to the Heximid Solo with extended beak to save the weight, and LOVE it. It does get condensation, though less than the TT Moment, and it runs down the sides and into the ground, so it isn't an issue. You will need to practice set up on the Hexamid before heading out, but is easy once you practice and is storm worthy as well, if staked out properly.
                                                  >
                                                  > WM Summerlight - This has been my go-to bag for four years on the JMT. It is, in my opinion, the perfect temp rated bag for summer Sierra hiking. It is cut narrow to minimize internal space required to warm up. The mistake many make is wearing too much in their bags which can compress the down on a narrow bag and having the opposite intended effect by the user of adding warmth. The key with down bags and quilts is loft. The more loft, the more trapped heat. I am looking into shaving some weight soon and picking up a Z-Packs bag, which eliminates the hood. I wear a hat anyways, so the hood on any sleeping bag is kind of wasted on me anyways.
                                                  >
                                                  > I haven't tried the backpack you are thinking of, but highly recommend Zimmerbuilt custom packs. Reasonably priced, get it built with what you need, not what major retailers market, and Chris is just a great guy to work with on building your pack. He built mine based on what I liked about a couple of previous packs I owned, ULA Conduit, and SMD Swift and Starlight.
                                                  >
                                                  > I'll second whoever mentioned renting or buying the Bearikade as your food storage.
                                                  >
                                                  > Have a great hike next summer!
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "allison1288" <allison.nadler88@> wrote:
                                                  > >
                                                  > > I'll be hiking the JMT next July and I'm updating some of my gear- mainly the big three. This is what I plan on purchasing. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with the gear (good or bad) that could help me with the final choice. I'm looking to go lightweight so that was a huge consideration when looking at these items. I'm also most likely going to use either a BV500 or bearikade weekender if I can get a good price on one so my pack has to accommodate that.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Tent:
                                                  > > Tarptent Contrail
                                                  > > 1+ person 24.5 oz $199
                                                  > > http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Sleeping Bag:
                                                  > > Western Mountaineering Summerlite
                                                  > > 32 degree temperature rating
                                                  > > 1.3 lbs
                                                  > > about $340
                                                  > > http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69 http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=Products&page=Sleeping%20Bags&cat=ExtremeLite%20Series&ContentId=69
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Pack:
                                                  > > Gossamer Mariposa
                                                  > > 27 oz $177
                                                  > > 4,244 c.i. (69.5 l.) total capacity
                                                  > > 35 lb max carry capacity
                                                  > > http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all.html
                                                  > >
                                                  >
                                                • treeve17
                                                  My 2 cents: Tarptent: lots of condensation, but a good design and roomy. It s fine if you re ready for the condensation. Why not sleep in the open unless
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Dec 3 9:29 AM
                                                    My 2 cents:

                                                    Tarptent:  lots of condensation, but a good design and roomy.  It's fine if you're ready for the condensation.  Why not sleep in the open unless it's raining? 
                                                    Sleeping bag:  I use Montbell but need the extra shoulder room.  I've heard good things about WM but 32 may be a little cool, depending on you.  Getting the right bag is super important -- paired with a good pad.
                                                    Pack:  I'm a huge fan of the ULA packs.  I use the Circuit.  Catalyst is the same design but larger.  My enjoyment of backpacking improved a TON when I switched to the ULA.  Only caution is not to exceed 30 lbs, and that might be pushing it (a little more for the Catalyst).  20-25 is the sweet spot -- very comfortable at that weight.  Very intelligent and useful design. 
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