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Tuesday's JMT Blog Post, Announced Today!

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  • Ray Rippel
    Good day, I was on a trip to the Reno/Tahoe area (checking out our partially built new home near the Sierra Nevada--woohoo) and didn t get my blog post
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 21, 2013
      Good day, 

      I was on a trip to the Reno/Tahoe area (checking out our partially built new home near the Sierra Nevada--woohoo) and didn't get my blog post announced for this week. The topic is water purification.


      Good hiking, Ray
    • Robert
      Are we going to be neighbors Ray? I live in Sparks, so we ll be in the same neck of the woods! Congrats on the new home! Very cool! Maybe we ll cross paths
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 21, 2013
        Are we going to be neighbors Ray? I live in Sparks, so we'll be in the same neck of the woods! Congrats on the new home! Very cool! Maybe we'll cross paths roaming the local trails someday.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ray Rippel <ray.rippel@...> wrote:
        >
        > Good day,
        >
        > I was on a trip to the Reno/Tahoe area (checking out our partially built
        > new home near the Sierra Nevada--woohoo) and didn't get my blog post
        > announced for this week. The topic is water purification.
        >
        > Check it out, and be sure to leave a comment if the urge strikes
        > you.<http://jmtbook.com/category/blog/>
        >
        > Good hiking, Ray
        >
      • Ray Rippel
        Perhaps! We ll be about a mile north of I80 and two miles east of the California border! East Verdi exit!
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 21, 2013
          Perhaps! We'll be about a mile north of I80 and two miles east of the California border! East Verdi exit!

        • Robert
          Sweet area! Sommersett and East Verdi are nice. Keep an eye on the wildfires that crop up below Peavine every once in awhile by keeping good clearance. Great
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 21, 2013
            Sweet area! Sommersett and East Verdi are nice. Keep an eye on the wildfires that crop up below Peavine every once in awhile by keeping good clearance. Great views and bike paths around there too! There are some good training use trails heading up Peavine that make for good early season training hikes as well. Enjoy your new digs!

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ray Rippel <ray.rippel@...> wrote:
            >
            > Perhaps! We'll be about a mile north of I80 and two miles east of the
            > California border! East Verdi exit!
            >
          • Larry Beck
            Who makes the best winter backpacks? I d like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I d like it to be in the ballpark of
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 1, 2013
              Who makes the best winter backpacks?

              I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

              I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
               
              Larry
            • John Ladd
              An Army surplus MOLLE II (the recently discontinued version with separate main tuck and lower sleep system carrier) is more pack than many people like, but
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 1, 2013
                An Army surplus MOLLE II (the recently discontinued version with separate main tuck and lower sleep system carrier) is "more" pack than many people like, but if you use the rucksack only (leaving the sleep system carrier off) it is 3000 cubic inches and snowshoes are easily lashed to the right and left of the ruck. There are compression straps that will hold the snowshoes very securely. The frame holds very tight to the back so it doesn't shift around (particularly useful in winter) and it transfers weight to the hips very well. If you try to overfill it on the top (as shown on the picture at the page below) water can come in, but if you make sure that the top flap is tight over the ruck it's reasonably waterproof. (I shingle the top with my Tyvek groundcloth to add some more waterproofing.)

                Since the old version is being phased out in preference of a less-easily-modified single-compartment variation, it is cheap ($98 including shipping). Heavy (about 8 lbs empty). Can be expanded to 4600 cu inches by adding the sleep system carrier or 5600 cu in by adding side-mounted "sustainment pouches" (must order pouches separately). It uses the PALS system, so there are lots of choices to add more pockets and pouches if you want.


                Does not have a dedicated ice ax loop but has plenty of attachment options so you can rig something easily with a piece of webbing. The weight can project rearward if you aren't careful to pack it with the heavy items held close to the back. Either packing heavy items in  a bear can or separately buying a radio pouch can help keep the weight distribution forward.

                I have an extra radio pouch and an extra pack cover I can sell you if the one listed above does not include them. The extra pack cover would add rain protection, though I generally have not found I need it.

                Big enough to hold a Bearikade Expedition vertically (or horizontally at the top of the pack)

                John Curran Ladd
                1616 Castro Street
                San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                415-648-9279


                On Sun, Dec 1, 2013 at 9:25 AM, Larry Beck <becklaurence@...> wrote:
                 

                Who makes the best winter backpacks?

                I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

                I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
                 
                Larry


              • Larry Beck
                Thanks John!   Larry ________________________________ From: John Ladd To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, December 1, 2013
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 1, 2013
                  Thanks John!
                   
                  Larry

                  From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, December 1, 2013 10:16 AM
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Suggestion for a good winter pack?

                   
                  An Army surplus MOLLE II (the recently discontinued version with separate main tuck and lower sleep system carrier) is "more" pack than many people like, but if you use the rucksack only (leaving the sleep system carrier off) it is 3000 cubic inches and snowshoes are easily lashed to the right and left of the ruck. There are compression straps that will hold the snowshoes very securely. The frame holds very tight to the back so it doesn't shift around (particularly useful in winter) and it transfers weight to the hips very well. If you try to overfill it on the top (as shown on the picture at the page below) water can come in, but if you make sure that the top flap is tight over the ruck it's reasonably waterproof. (I shingle the top with my Tyvek groundcloth to add some more waterproofing.)

                  Since the old version is being phased out in preference of a less-easily-modified single-compartment variation, it is cheap ($98 including shipping). Heavy (about 8 lbs empty). Can be expanded to 4600 cu inches by adding the sleep system carrier or 5600 cu in by adding side-mounted "sustainment pouches" (must order pouches separately). It uses the PALS system, so there are lots of choices to add more pockets and pouches if you want.


                  Does not have a dedicated ice ax loop but has plenty of attachment options so you can rig something easily with a piece of webbing. The weight can project rearward if you aren't careful to pack it with the heavy items held close to the back. Either packing heavy items in  a bear can or separately buying a radio pouch can help keep the weight distribution forward.

                  I have an extra radio pouch and an extra pack cover I can sell you if the one listed above does not include them. The extra pack cover would add rain protection, though I generally have not found I need it.

                  Big enough to hold a Bearikade Expedition vertically (or horizontally at the top of the pack)

                  John Curran Ladd
                  1616 Castro Street
                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                  415-648-9279


                  On Sun, Dec 1, 2013 at 9:25 AM, Larry Beck <becklaurence@...> wrote:
                   
                  Who makes the best winter backpacks?

                  I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

                  I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
                   
                  Larry



                • robert shattuck
                  for winter snowshoeing and crampon hiking Larry, Aside from the built in rain fly, I d venture to say you ve pretty much described every summer pack out
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 1, 2013

                    " for winter snowshoeing and crampon hiking" 

                    Larry, 

                    Aside from the "built in" rain fly, I'd venture to say you've pretty much described every summer pack out there, other than most of the UL packs, many of which are stripped down to just the essentials and an ice axe loop or even compression straps seem extraneous. 

                    I'd kind of say it's more about YOU being a winter model and winter ready, but if you have a few bucks, check out 


                    Mystery ranch

                    Black diamond

                    .....and so on.......you can find an ice axe loop on pretty much any pack these days---the trick though is knowing how to use it. I've seen people just stick the axe in the loop and let it dangle there, swinging and banging around down about the back of their knees---just waiting to impale them. 

                    Bob Shattuck




                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Dec 1, 2013, at 9:25 AM, "Larry Beck" <becklaurence@...> wrote:

                     

                    Who makes the best winter backpacks?

                    I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

                    I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
                     
                    Larry

                  • Roleigh Martin
                    Granite Gear and Osprey Packs have mountain climbing packs. Sent from my iPhone See my Google Profile for interesting research links:
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 1, 2013
                      Granite Gear and Osprey Packs have mountain climbing packs. 

                      Sent from my iPhone
                      See my Google Profile for interesting research links:
                      http://tinyurl.com/3vnolh8

                      On Dec 1, 2013, at 9:25 AM, Larry Beck <becklaurence@...> wrote:

                       

                      Who makes the best winter backpacks?

                      I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

                      I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
                       
                      Larry

                    • Dittli-Goethals
                      Hi Larry I use a BCA (Backcountry Access) Alp 40 for work and play (I m guessing the 40 is liters?) This pack is designed more for ski mountaineering but could
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 2, 2013
                        Hi Larry

                        I use a BCA (Backcountry Access) Alp 40 for work and play (I'm guessing the 40 is liters?) This pack is designed more for ski mountaineering but could work well for any snow sport. It's rather heavy, as it is constructed of a ballistics cloth to resist cuts and abrasions from ski edges, crampons, iceaxes, etc. It has specific pockets for shovel and probe, a roll top AND a top flap; no spindrift finds it's way in!

                        The pack carries nice for skiing.

                        JD
                        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail 


                        On Sun, Dec 1, 2013 at 9:25 AM, Larry Beck <becklaurence@...> wrote:
                         

                        Who makes the best winter backpacks?

                        I'd like to find a comfortable pack for winter snow shoeing and crampon hiking. I'd like it to be in the ballpark of 2500-3000 cu in and it should be able to easily accommodate an ice-axe, crampons, and/or snow shoes.

                        I'd be really cool if it had a built in rain cover. I know I've seen that before.
                         
                        Larry




                        --
                        John Dittli/Leslie Goethals
                        John Dittli Photography
                        www.johndittli.com
                        760-934-3505 

                        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
                        2010  IPPY Gold Medal Award Winner
                      • John Ladd
                        Looks like the current version of this pack is 40 liters - 2440 cubic inches. I don t see that they make the Alp line any more.
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 2, 2013
                          Looks like the current version of this pack is 40 liters - 2440 cubic inches. I don't see that they make the Alp line any more.


                          Not sure how close the present version it is to John's pack. 

                          I think a snowshoer like me probably can get along on a higher volume pack that a skier like John. I tend to distrust down (other than for sleeping bags), so I prefer higher-volume packs to accommodate fleece and Polartec which do take up space

                          But if I would trust anyone's advice about winter Sierra travel, it would be John's, not mine.

                          On Mon, Dec 2, 2013 at 7:57 PM, Dittli-Goethals <johndittli@...> wrote:
                           

                          Hi Larry

                          I use a BCA (Backcountry Access) Alp 40 for work and play (I'm guessing the 40 is liters?) This pack is designed more for ski mountaineering but could work well for any snow sport. It's rather heavy, as it is constructed of a ballistics cloth to resist cuts and abrasions from ski edges, crampons, iceaxes, etc. It has specific pockets for shovel and probe, a roll top AND a top flap; no spindrift finds it's way in!

                          The pack carries nice for skiing.

                          JD
                        • johndittli
                          Looks like my pack is no longer available. Too old school I suppose what with not having a zipper opening... JD ... Looks like the current version of this pack
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 2, 2013

                            Looks like my pack is no longer available. Too old school I suppose what with not having a zipper opening...


                            JD 



                            ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnladd@...> wrote:

                            Looks like the current version of this pack is 40 liters - 2440 cubic inches. I don't see that they make the Alp line any more.


                            Not sure how close the present version it is to John's pack. 

                            I think a snowshoer like me probably can get along on a higher volume pack that a skier like John. I tend to distrust down (other than for sleeping bags), so I prefer higher-volume packs to accommodate fleece and Polartec which do take up space

                            But if I would trust anyone's advice about winter Sierra travel, it would be John's, not mine.

                            On Mon, Dec 2, 2013 at 7:57 PM, Dittli-Goethals <johndittli@...> wrote:
                             
                            Hi Larry

                            I use a BCA (Backcountry Access) Alp 40 for work and play (I'm guessing the 40 is liters?) This pack is designed more for ski mountaineering but could work well for any snow sport. It's rather heavy, as it is constructed of a ballistics cloth to resist cuts and abrasions from ski edges, crampons, iceaxes, etc. It has specific pockets for shovel and probe, a roll top AND a top flap; no spindrift finds it's way in!

                            The pack carries nice for skiing.

                            JD
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