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Tuesday Blog Post

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  • Ray Rippel
    Good day, I m evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 8, 2013
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      Good day,

      I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

      Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

      Good hiking, Ray

      Ray Rippel
      Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail
    • arthurvino
      NIce article.. I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 9, 2013
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        NIce article..

        I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping one loses all the loft anyways.. 


        Quilt pros:

        less confining

        better ventilation

        more versatile

        lighter

        pack smaller



        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ray.rippel@...> wrote:

        Good day,

        I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

        Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

        Good hiking, Ray

        Ray Rippel
        Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail
      • cehauser1
        Arthur Vino: Are quilts generally bag shaped, like a sleeping bag, with insulation on just one side? (In other words: is there an un-insulated bottom
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 13, 2013
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          Arthur Vino:

          Are quilts generally "bag" shaped, like a sleeping bag, with insulation on just one side?  (In other words:  is there an un-insulated bottom side?)  I toss and turn so much at night, if it wasn't wrapped around me, I'd be uncovered within an hour.  I do always end up sleeping on the zipper of my sleeping bag, which isn't comfortable, and it seems like a quilt might be more comfortable to me, in addition to all the other pros you list.


          Chris.


           



          ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <arthurvino@...> wrote:

          NIce article..

          I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping one loses all the loft anyways.. 


          Quilt pros:

          less confining

          better ventilation

          more versatile

          lighter

          pack smaller



          ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ray.rippel@...> wrote:

          Good day,

          I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

          Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

          Good hiking, Ray

          Ray Rippel
          Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail
        • Jgoring1
          The therma rest quilt comes with snaps that anchor it to the pad. So no tossing and turning problems. Loved mine for 20 days on the jmt. Getting cold? Add
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 13, 2013
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            The therma rest quilt comes with snaps that anchor it to the pad.  So no tossing and turning problems.  Loved mine for 20 days on the jmt. Getting cold?  Add long johns. 

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Oct 13, 2013, at 8:00 PM, <cehauser1@...> wrote:

             

            Arthur Vino:

            Are quilts generally "bag" shaped, like a sleeping bag, with insulation on just one side?  (In other words:  is there an un-insulated bottom side?)  I toss and turn so much at night, if it wasn't wrapped around me, I'd be uncovered within an hour.  I do always end up sleeping on the zipper of my sleeping bag, which isn't comfortable, and it seems like a quilt might be more comfortable to me, in addition to all the other pros you list.


            Chris.


             



            ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <arthurvino@...> wrote:

            NIce article..

            I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping one loses all the loft anyways.. 


            Quilt pros:

            less confining

            better ventilation

            more versatile

            lighter

            pack smaller



            ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ray.rippel@...> wrote:

            Good day,

            I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

            Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

            Good hiking, Ray

            Ray Rippel
            Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

          • Shawn Peterson
            I ve moved on to a Nunatak quilt and they use straps that go around the pad. I m a side sleeper that tosses and turns and you ll be pleasantly surprised at
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 13, 2013
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              I've moved on to a Nunatak quilt and they use straps that go around the pad.  I'm a side sleeper that tosses and turns and you'll be pleasantly surprised at the comfort level the quilt can offer.  Mine is extra wide and has two ounces of overfill and only weighs 22ozs.  I took it down to the low 20's  with nothing but a fleece beenie and base layers (icebreaker) and wAs plenty comfortable.  Shelter was a tarp tent double rainbow and a thermarest xtherm pad.  I woke up to ice covering everything but the quilt was warm all night 

              Katabatic and jacks r better are also done decent quilt companies.  Nunatak is a custom shop and will cost you a bit of money but I was very pleased with what  I got.

              Ymmv
              Shawn 

              On Oct 13, 2013, at 8:08 PM, Jgoring1 <jgoring1@...> wrote:

               

              The therma rest quilt comes with snaps that anchor it to the pad.  So no tossing and turning problems.  Loved mine for 20 days on the jmt. Getting cold?  Add long johns. 

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Oct 13, 2013, at 8:00 PM, <cehauser1@...> wrote:

               

              Arthur Vino:

              Are quilts generally "bag" shaped, like a sleeping bag, with insulation on just one side?  (In other words:  is there an un-insulated bottom side?)  I toss and turn so much at night, if it wasn't wrapped around me, I'd be uncovered within an hour.  I do always end up sleeping on the zipper of my sleeping bag, which isn't comfortable, and it seems like a quilt might be more comfortable to me, in addition to all the other pros you list.


              Chris.


               



              ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <arthurvino@...> wrote:

              NIce article..

              I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping one loses all the loft anyways.. 


              Quilt pros:

              less confining

              better ventilation

              more versatile

              lighter

              pack smaller



              ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ray.rippel@...> wrote:

              Good day,

              I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

              Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

              Good hiking, Ray

              Ray Rippel
              Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

            • Lynn Alexander
              We use a Nunatak quilt too. We measured what size would fit for the two of us together, and they made it to order with some over fill since I am a very cold
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 14, 2013
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                We use a Nunatak quilt too. We measured what size would fit for the two of us together,  and they made it to order with some over fill since I am a very cold sleeper. Some mornings our water bottles have been almost solidly frozen but with the hoods that Nunatak sells to go with the quilt we were comfortably warm. It is much more comfortable and lighter than down mummy bags. They are easy to work with to get exactly what you want.
                Lynn

                On Oct 13, 2013 10:17 PM, "Shawn Peterson" <pdawg893@...> wrote:
                 

                I've moved on to a Nunatak quilt and they use straps that go around the pad.  I'm a side sleeper that tosses and turns and you'll be pleasantly surprised at the comfort level the quilt can offer.  Mine is extra wide and has two ounces of overfill and only weighs 22ozs.  I took it down to the low 20's  with nothing but a fleece beenie and base layers (icebreaker) and wAs plenty comfortable.  Shelter was a tarp tent double rainbow and a thermarest xtherm pad.  I woke up to ice covering everything but the quilt was warm all night 

                Katabatic and jacks r better are also done decent quilt companies.  Nunatak is a custom shop and will cost you a bit of money but I was very pleased with what  I got.

                Ymmv
                Shawn 

                On Oct 13, 2013, at 8:08 PM, Jgoring1 <jgoring1@...> wrote:

                 

                The therma rest quilt comes with snaps that anchor it to the pad.  So no tossing and turning problems.  Loved mine for 20 days on the jmt. Getting cold?  Add long johns. 

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Oct 13, 2013, at 8:00 PM, <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                 

                Arthur Vino:

                Are quilts generally "bag" shaped, like a sleeping bag, with insulation on just one side?  (In other words:  is there an un-insulated bottom side?)  I toss and turn so much at night, if it wasn't wrapped around me, I'd be uncovered within an hour.  I do always end up sleeping on the zipper of my sleeping bag, which isn't comfortable, and it seems like a quilt might be more comfortable to me, in addition to all the other pros you list.


                Chris.


                 



                ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <arthurvino@...> wrote:

                NIce article..

                I would add that most lightweighters and experienced hikers use quilts instead of sleeping bags, since the compressed side that one is sleeping one loses all the loft anyways.. 


                Quilt pros:

                less confining

                better ventilation

                more versatile

                lighter

                pack smaller



                ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ray.rippel@...> wrote:

                Good day,

                I'm evaluating my 2013 gear choices over on the JMTBook.com website blog. First up: sleeping bag.

                Take a look if you get a chance;  comments at the bottom of the blog post are welcome!

                Good hiking, Ray

                Ray Rippel
                Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

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