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DIY Front-mounted water bottles

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  • John Ladd
    In a conversation a while back, Ravi mentioned loading a water bottle on the front to iprove center of mass issues (the pack moving it to the rear). I
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 7, 2013
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      In  a conversation a while back, Ravi mentioned loading a water bottle on the front to iprove center of mass issues (the pack moving it to the rear).

      I suggested this at the time

      "A square plastic lab bottle can be secured to the PALS webbing found on many packs (esp. the military or military-inspired ones) using a belt key hook and 10 mil Pipe Wrap or duct tape. The hook supports the weight and a rubber band keeps it from flopping. A 1-qt bottle shown below, though I've also done it with a 16 ounce one. The square bottles stay more stable than the round ones. Wide-mouth bottles (not shown) are nice, because they make it easy to add snow to produce some extra water each time you pass a snow field (assuming no red snow problem).

      I can wear these on one or both shoulder straps either at shoulder height or chest height."

      Inline image 1

      It stayed well on my pack for my recent 20-day hike (and on a number of training hikes) and Bob Shattuck let me illustrate it when we met on the trail - about 7 minutes into his #13 Video. I had extra tape along in case it didn't stay together for the whole trip, but it did just fine without any need for repair, kept the water handy, let me add my premixed Aqua Mire drops on the fly and moved weight forward. The little metal hook also allowed me to draw water from sources without removing my gloves or getting them wet. My new favorite piece of small idiosyncratic gear.


      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • John
      No thanks, John L. The last place I want to add more weight is towards the top of my shoulder strap system. Like my pack weight as a whole, I choose to
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2013
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        No thanks, John L. The last place I want to add more weight is towards the top of my shoulder strap system. 

        Like my pack weight as a whole, I choose to strategically place my water bottle(s) and their respective weight close to my waist and the strength of the pelvic girdle. 

        Just my preference....but as always, HYOH. 

        John M

        On Oct 7, 2013, at 5:11 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

         

        In  a conversation a while back, Ravi mentioned loading a water bottle on the front to iprove center of mass issues (the pack moving it to the rear).

        I suggested this at the time

        "A square plastic lab bottle can be secured to the PALS webbing found on many packs (esp. the military or military-inspired ones) using a belt key hook and 10 mil Pipe Wrap or duct tape. The hook supports the weight and a rubber band keeps it from flopping. A 1-qt bottle shown below, though I've also done it with a 16 ounce one. The square bottles stay more stable than the round ones. Wide-mouth bottles (not shown) are nice, because they make it easy to add snow to produce some extra water each time you pass a snow field (assuming no red snow problem).

        I can wear these on one or both shoulder straps either at shoulder height or chest height."

        <water bottle with clip for front.JPG>

        It stayed well on my pack for my recent 20-day hike (and on a number of training hikes) and Bob Shattuck let me illustrate it when we met on the trail - about 7 minutes into his #13 Video. I had extra tape along in case it didn't stay together for the whole trip, but it did just fine without any need for repair, kept the water handy, let me add my premixed Aqua Mire drops on the fly and moved weight forward. The little metal hook also allowed me to draw water from sources without removing my gloves or getting them wet. My new favorite piece of small idiosyncratic gear.


        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279

      • John Ladd
        ... I agree with John M that you want weight carried on the hips. But too much weight down low is inefficient. See Army research slide below The ideal setup
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 8, 2013
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          On Mon, Oct 7, 2013 at 10:10 PM, John <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:
          ... The last place I want to add more weight is towards the top of my shoulder strap system. 

          Like my pack weight as a whole, I choose to strategically place my water bottle(s) and their respective weight close to my waist and the strength of the pelvic girdle. 

          I agree with John M that you want weight carried on the hips. But too much weight down low is inefficient. See Army research slide below

          The ideal setup (difficult in practice) is to have center of mass as far forward as possible and fairly high, but to have that weight transferred to the pelvic girdle via the hip belt.  A stiff external frame and a wide hip belt tend to do this in the military pack designs, which markedly reduce load on the shoulders at the cost of a fair amount of added total weight. So less weight carried by the shoulders due to weight transfer, but more carried by the legs due to higher total packweight. 

          If you prefer less total weight, John's low-mounted water bottle may be better.  But I find my legs are stronger than my upper body, so weight transfer is more important to me than total weight. 

          I tried hipbelt mounted gear and found I could only put limited stuff down there without interfering with comfortable arm swing. The military used to put canteens in hipbelt-mounted pouches but has tended more recently to move water weight upward using hydration bladders -- in part for center of mass effects. I use my hipbelt-mounted canteen pouch for lighter things like cameras, binoculars, stocking cap after it gets warm. 


          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279



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