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Re: [John Muir Trail] Menu Planning

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  • Jo T
    I second the dehydrator suggestion. It s the one thing I would change on my next trip.  Not only is it greatly cost effective, but you do not have to worry
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2013
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      I second the dehydrator suggestion. It's the one thing I would change on my next trip. 
      Not only is it greatly cost effective, but you do not have to worry about eating expensive dehydrated meals with crazy additives that you're not even sure you would enjoy.

      You can eat just like at home -- tried and true recipes you love, with a lot of variety. 

      My vote:
      homemade, boil water and pour directly into the storage bag that contains the food so no cleanup (most of the homemade food I snagged from the hiker's barrels didn't need boiling water, just really hot water). Take a bowl/mug so the bag has something to sit in.

      PS Canister stove -- loved my micro-rocket!

      JoT.





      From: "jamesrchristopherson@..." <jamesrchristopherson@...>
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, October 1, 2013 9:08 PM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Menu Planning

       
      Can I get some thoughts from anyone on Menu planning, not what to eat, but how you cook such as:
       
      purchased dehydrated meals vs homemade meals
       
      or cooking in your pots vs cooking in boiling bags
       
       
      Thank you.
       
       
      James
       


    • ravi_jmt2013
      I cooked breakfast and dinner directly in my Jetboil Sol rather than using bags. Cleanup of the pot was not as difficult as I originally thought particularly
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 2, 2013
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        I cooked breakfast and dinner directly in my Jetboil Sol rather than using bags.  Cleanup of the pot was not as difficult as I originally thought particularly at breakfast.  I would eat my oatmeal and then boil another cup of water for coffee.  Although the coffee might have tiny bits of oatmeal in it if I didn't scrape out the pot well enough with my spoon, I didn't really mind.  And the pot was pretty clean after drinking the coffee. I don't drink coffee or tea after dinner but cleanup of the pot still wasn't a big deal.  I made a Jetboil pot cozy which worked out well.  Many dinners required using the cozy, reheating the food briefly, and placing in the cozy again.


        I found that one small fuel canister lasts for a very long time.  The small canister I purchased at Red's Meadow actually lasted until the final dinner of the trip.  I switched over to the canister I purchased at MTR for the final breakfast and then gave it away at the portal.   Next time I'll only buy two canisters - one for each half of the trip.


        I did not use any commercial foods specifically designed for backpacking. Instead, I used regular grocery items that I repackaged at home ahead of time.  For most of the repackaging I used thin sandwich bags (not ziplocks) which take up hardly any room when empty unlike zip locks.  For future trips, I plan to not send as many resupply packages and instead buy groceries along the way as needed.


        I did not take enough food for the second half of the trip. I decided to finish the hike a day early to have more food per day and it worked out OK.  What people say about "hiker hunger" really kicking in on the second half of the trip was very true for me.  I'm a bit concerned about how to deal with this on my next hike since I want to do something in the 500 mile range next year.  I'll have to increase calorie density, resupply more often, or speed up. Maybe a combination of the three.





        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        Can I get some thoughts from anyone on Menu planning, not what to eat, but how you cook such as:

         

        purchased dehydrated meals vs homemade meals

         

        or cooking in your pots vs cooking in boiling bags

         

         

        Thank you.

         

         

        James

         

      • judithsmcguire
        I dehydrate my own food, using lots of recipes from Backpacker Gourmet but also anything leftover from dinner. Since I m a vegetarian, like spicy food, and
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 2, 2013
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          I dehydrate my own food, using lots of recipes from Backpacker Gourmet but also anything leftover from dinner.  Since I'm a vegetarian, like spicy food, and can't stand all the additives in commercial freeze dried this suits me well.

          One recommendation is to realize that you might not be very hungry in the first week or even two weeks.  Some comfort type foods (chocolate!) go down much easier than heavy meals (Mac & cheese).  I also bring premeasured gatorade which isn't really food but it's calories and electrolytes. 

          The other issue is the bear cannister.  Volume matters.  I've taken to dehydrating lunches (black bean salsa, hummus, and bruschetta are my favorites).  I smash down a bag of tortilla chips to mix in with the salsa). 

          I love Dr. Kracker small crackers because they are tasty and don't fall apart when jammed into a pack.  Cheese lasts at least a week (but must be double bagged because it sweats oil).  Supplementary salt, olive oil, and a tiny bottle of tabasco are lovely additions.

          Judo (Judy McGuire)

           



          ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          Can I get some thoughts from anyone on Menu planning, not what to eat, but how you cook such as:

           

          purchased dehydrated meals vs homemade meals

           

          or cooking in your pots vs cooking in boiling bags

           

           

          Thank you.

           

           

          James

           

        • Stuart Dodson
          Does a list exist of typical hiker foods and their calories. I feel sure I need to add more calories to my hikes. English Stu ________________________________
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 3, 2013
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            Does a list exist of typical hiker foods and their calories. I feel sure I need to add more calories to my hikes.
            English Stu




          • John Ladd
            Stu -- Our files area includes a very long USDA list of foods (7500 items) sorted in the order of calories per ounce. On one version of the list, I focused on
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 3, 2013
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              Stu --

              Our files area includes a very long USDA list of foods (7500 items) sorted in the order of calories per ounce.  On one version of the list, I focused on items that might me used for backpacking. e.g., I eliminated whale blubber but kept coconut oil. See esp the file named Calories per Oz Shortlist


              Lots of my trail recipes were derived by thinking about how to make things high on the list palatable.

              Shortest version of the list is that 

              fats and oils are about 250 calories per ounce (244 to 255)
              sugars, other carbohydrates and proteins top out at 110 calories per ounce (when fully dehydrated)

              Nuts and other foods that have combine fats and oils with carbs/protein fall in between (when fully dehydrated)

              Foods without fats and oils will be under 110 calories per ounce if they include any water. Some of these can be dehydrated at home and rehydrated in the field

              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
              415-648-9279


              On Thu, Oct 3, 2013 at 1:56 AM, Stuart Dodson <stuartdodson@...> wrote:
               

              Does a list exist of typical hiker foods and their calories. I feel sure I need to add more calories to my hikes.
              English Stu





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