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RE: rest time after thru-hike

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  • whcobbs
    JoT-- The experience you describe is also familiar to marathoners and others who do extensive endurance training culminating in an extended depletion event. It
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 30 5:46 AM
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       JoT--

       

      The experience you describe is also familiar to marathoners and others who do extensive endurance training culminating in an extended depletion event.  It tends to frustrate the goal of a continued training program.  What usually works (assuming you are not injured), is a series of easy abbreviated workouts alternate days, the goal at first  being just to get a warm-up.  After about 10 days you should be ready for more challenging workouts.  A related phenomenon is an emotional crash following the suspension/interruption of endurance training.  This too is familiar to endurance-trained athletes and their trainers in the setting of injury.  The usual solution is to get back to some form of aerobic training.  In the event of complicating impact injuries, swimming or aquarobics usually works.

       

      Walt



      ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <groundhogsteve@...> wrote:

      When I was very much younger, I rode a bicycle across the country.  Upon finishing, I literally found it very painful to walk - all my muscles, tendons, and ligaments were set up for riding a bike - the short length pedal stroke, not a normal length walking stride.  Six months later I was still having trouble walking. 


      For those who are runners, I can see the same thing happening on a JMT hike - the short hiking stride vs. the longer running stride. 


      Even though I bailed really early on my JMT trip this month, I understand the whole diet thing.  I only planned on one Clif bar per day, but after six days of them I'm at the point that if I ever see another one of those in my life I think I'm gonna upchuck.



    • dlink_95670
      RE: Clif Bars. I ve had the same thing. I love ProBars for their excellent nutrition and high calorie content for the bulk. But after a week of them, it was
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 30 7:25 AM
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        RE: Clif Bars. I've had the same thing. I love ProBars for their excellent nutrition and high calorie content for the bulk. But after a week of them, it was months before I could eat another. Nowadays I mix it up and take several different kinds of bars. Helps break the monotony, and there are so many bars out there, it's easy to find lots of choices. 



        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        When I was very much younger, I rode a bicycle across the country.  Upon finishing, I literally found it very painful to walk - all my muscles, tendons, and ligaments were set up for riding a bike - the short length pedal stroke, not a normal length walking stride.  Six months later I was still having trouble walking. 


        For those who are runners, I can see the same thing happening on a JMT hike - the short hiking stride vs. the longer running stride. 


        Even though I bailed really early on my JMT trip this month, I understand the whole diet thing.  I only planned on one Clif bar per day, but after six days of them I'm at the point that if I ever see another one of those in my life I think I'm gonna upchuck.



      • Jo T
        Thanks, Walt, I ll give the alternate days/easy workouts a try. Luckily, I m okay on the emotional crash -- other than not wanting to go back to work.=) No
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 30 9:11 AM
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          Thanks, Walt, I'll give the alternate days/easy workouts a try.
          Luckily, I'm okay on the emotional crash -- other than not wanting to go back to work.=) No injuries, thank goodness!
          Not even a blister.

          Happy hiking!
          JoT.

          From: "walter.cobbs@..." <walter.cobbs@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 5:46 AM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] RE: rest time after thru-hike

           
           JoT--
           
          The experience you describe is also familiar to marathoners and others who do extensive endurance training culminating in an extended depletion event.  It tends to frustrate the goal of a continued training program.  What usually works (assuming you are not injured), is a series of easy abbreviated workouts alternate days, the goal at first  being just to get a warm-up.  After about 10 days you should be ready for more challenging workouts.  A related phenomenon is an emotional crash following the suspension/interruption of endurance training.  This too is familiar to endurance-trained athletes and their trainers in the setting of injury.  The usual solution is to get back to some form of aerobic training.  In the event of complicating impact injuries, swimming or aquarobics usually works.
           
          Walt


          -
        • Don Amundson
          I think everyone has a different decompression experience. When I did a 2009 thru I was in fair shape, carried a much heavier pack than did this year and
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 30 9:48 AM
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            I think everyone has a different decompression experience.  When I did a 2009 thru I was in fair shape, carried a much heavier pack than did this year and injured my knee coming off of Mt. Whitney.  When I got home I think I psychologically rested on my laurels and had no energy.  I started injury specific workouts about a week after returning but wasn't back to full body workouts for 3-4 weeks.  For me a thru hike of 20+ days is a very different experience than a trip of 5-10-15 days.  At 20 days the trip becomes a way of life.  My shelter is my home. The people I meet on the trail are my family.  When I return there are some big adjustments I have to make and sometimes depression can rear it's ugly head and suck the energy out of me. 

            After this years thru I was back in the gym the day after I returned.  Some contributing factors may be that I am in better shape than in 2009 though of course older at 68, my pack weight was much lighter (15lbs at the Portal with remaining food/water) and it was my second time doing it so it wasn't such a big deal and I had no "laurels" excuse. The depression component didn't kick in possibly because I knew what to expect and fought my way thru it on some unconscious level.

            I wouldn't worry too much about what your experiencing.  I doubt it's much different than what many experience. Relax, enjoy your memories of the trip.  Give yourself some time and start planning for another trip.


            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            From: jotslibrarylist@...
            Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2013 14:17:21 -0700
            Subject: [John Muir Trail] rest time after thru-hike

             

            Hello, all-
            So I finished my JMT thru-hike this week (trip report coming later), and was curious how much time people took after their trips before starting to work out again. My trip was 21 nights/22 days.

            I gave myself two days off, then did a short five mile hike today (no pack!!) and am exhausted. Yesterday it took me ALL DAY just to gear up to one trip (in the car!) to the local Target store. On the JMT, I was averaging 10-mile days in high elevation (37lb pack!) and much more challenging terrain (of course) then what is at our local nature preserve. 

            Prior to the trip, I had been hiking 4x/week about 5 miles each time (elevation not even a factor), plus gym 3x/wk 1.5 hours each session (mostly core and weight training).

            Any info/feedback on what worked for you is appreciated. I know everyone is different.

            JoT.


          • John Ladd
            For whatever it is worth, I did my first day of significant exercise today, 12 days post-trip. I hiked a course with good hills and a 42 lb training pack.
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 30 12:01 PM
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              For whatever it is worth, I did my first day of significant exercise today, 12 days post-trip. I hiked a course with good hills and a 42 lb training pack. There's a 2-mile uphill segment (600 ft of climb) where I tend to push hard on and keep track my times. I was about 2 minutes (5%) slower than my average time for that weight -- about the same as would be typical for me with a 50 lb back over that segment. So slower, but at least it felt as if I was well into recovery mode.

              I did do some toning classes in a gym in the interval before trying on a pack again (starting 6 days post-trip). Felt distinctly more fatigued than I considered normal. Maybe it will feel better this weekl

              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
              415-648-9279


              On Sat, Sep 28, 2013 at 2:17 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
               

              Hello, all-
              So I finished my JMT thru-hike this week (trip report coming later), and was curious how much time people took after their trips before starting to work out again. My trip was 21 nights/22 days.

              I gave myself two days off, then did a short five mile hike today (no pack!!) and am exhausted. Yesterday it took me ALL DAY just to gear up to one trip (in the car!) to the local Target store. On the JMT, I was averaging 10-mile days in high elevation (37lb pack!) and much more challenging terrain (of course) then what is at our local nature preserve. 

              Prior to the trip, I had been hiking 4x/week about 5 miles each time (elevation not even a factor), plus gym 3x/wk 1.5 hours each session (mostly core and weight training).

              Any info/feedback on what worked for you is appreciated. I know everyone is different.

              JoT.


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