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RE: RE: RE: Equipment review from JMT

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  • ravi_jmt2013
    I was actually responding to a comment regarding a free standing tent being required for the JMT. I used the Hexamid Twin which is not freestanding and was
    Message 1 of 32 , Sep 25, 2013
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      I was actually responding to a comment regarding a free standing tent being required for the JMT.  I used the Hexamid Twin which is not freestanding and was very happy with it. 


      I wonder if we met on the trail? I started on August 26 and finished on September 14 so it looks like I was just one day ahead and our trips were of the same duration.



      ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

       Ravi-

      "I've concluded that a standalone tent is really required for the JMT"

      I hiked the JMT Tuolumne to Whiney Portal 27 August -- 15 September 2013,  For the whole trip I used only my Roy Robinson designed self-sewn poncho-tarp without any trouble.  When I left my hiking poles on Donahue Pass (fatigue), I substituted lines to the top of a boulder and pitched low (still near the top of Donahue), defeating wind gusts.  I do carry Al gutter spikes as stakes.

      I should add (1) I never was rained on, excepting hail/rain at the top of Silver Pass; (2) a standalone is usually quicker for setup and takedown.
      Regards,
      Walt

      ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      I used the Hexamid Twin on the JMT this year and I agree that very large rocks are required when stakes cannot be driven into the ground.  Anticipating this situation on the JMT, I used the Hexamid on a trip to the Grand Canyon earlier this year where there is no chance of using stakes at impacted campsites below the rim.  That was good practice for the JMT.  On the JMT itself, I was surprised to find that there were only a couple of sites where I couldn't use stakes at all and probably 1/3 of the sites required using rocks in addition to stakes.  Those rocks definitely had to be heavy and, in the case of substituting for stakes, had to be of the right shape to securely hold the lines.  Overall, I was pleased with the shelter given the low weight but I can see how two people sharing a tent might be tempted to split the weight of a free standing shelter.  Although most of the time setup was accomplished in around 5 minutes, I did spend about 30 minutes setting up at Thousand Island Lake using only rocks (but it turned out to be one of my favorite sites for the views).


      I have read on other sites that the Twin might be slightly easier to set up than the Solo plus since it only requires eight stakes rather than ten but I'm not sure whether this is the case or not.




      ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


      During my recent JMT experience, I had the opportunity to really shake down some new equipment.

      1) Zpacks Hexamid Solo Plus tarp/tent. This tarp tent was a dichotomy for me. Below tree line with good soil available, the Hexamid worked great. Above tree line in the very rocky terrain and high winds of the High Sierra, it was horrible. I tried to use rocks to secure the lines, but the tension required to hold the tarp tent taut for the winds required very large rocks. I've concluded that a standalone tent is really required for the JMT.


    • johndittli
      I bivy regularly until ~December or January in a drought (in the Sierra) and then again in starting in April. From my experience my bag gets damp (usually
      Message 32 of 32 , Sep 26, 2013
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        I bivy regularly until ~December or January in a drought (in the Sierra) and then again in starting in April. From my experience my bag gets damp (usually frozen) inside my bivisack. It's much worse of course if you're inclined to sleep with your head in.


        I do have an older 3 layer gortex bivy that has a soft fleece like "hand" on the inside. This seems to reduce the condensation a bit. Either way, I try and spend a half hour or more in the sun warming up and drying out.




        JD

        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail

        see book here



        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        On recent bit of the Sierra High route from Lake Italy to Purple lake,
        slept mostly "cowboy style" with temps consistently below freezing. THe
        outside of my bag was always a bit crispy, but loft still held up pretty
        well (Katabatic quilt). Does anyone have experience with a lightweight
        bivy for this purpose? Does it have enough of a micro-climate to reduce
        condensation within the bag when you are below the dew point? I just
        love sleeping outside.....
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