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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip report: solo SOBO JMT + WEBO HST

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  • Kyle Arn
    Chris, did you use the Escape Bivy on top of your sleeping pad or is it big enough to put a pad and bag inside of it?  It looks pretty cool.  Does it have a
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 13, 2013
      Chris, did you use the Escape Bivy on top of your sleeping pad or is it big enough to put a pad and bag inside of it?  It looks pretty cool.  Does it have a zipper and a drawstring for around your head?
       
      Kyle

      From: Chris Hauser <cehauser1@...>
      To: "johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 1:57 AM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip report: solo SOBO JMT + WEBO HST
       
      My email account won't let me reply to responses under the new Yahoo Groups format, so I'm posting a new message:
       
       
      Robert: 
       
      Yes, I've decided that lighter is better.  On this trip, I found that I needed to use nearly everything in my pack every single day, except for some first aid items, some toiletry items, and the rain gear.  Yet, at the end of the trip, there was not a single item that I wished I had taken that I didn't have.  That felt good.
       
      Yes, oops, I meant Upper Hamilton Lake.  Thanks for the correction.  (The name Harrison probably came from my use of the Tom Harrison JMT map pack, and from the fact that I had written that trip report at 2AM).  Yes, I was blown away when I looked down from Precipice Lake down to Upper Hamilton Lake.  I was not expecting the most amazing mountain scenery to be at the very end of the trip.  Really cool.
       
      No, I didn't use a tarp, just a very lightweight bivy sack to provide some weather protection outside my sleeping bag.  I used the Adventure Medical SOL "Escape Bivvy".  This is not the same as their "Emergency Bivvy", which is a single-use Pop-Tart wrapper.  The "Escape" bivy is really tough, breathable soft Tyvek fabric with mirrored inner liner to reflect heat back in.  I've camped out in this bivy sack for about 25 nights now, including the 18 nights on the JMT, and it is as good as new.  For $42, this the best simple bivy sacks I have found.  My only complaint is that it is bright orange, as I generally try to stick with earth tones.
       
       
      Gail:
      Thanks for you compliments.  As I have always said, I do not consider myself an athlete, and I credit my ability to hike 20 miles per day to 2 main things:  my light backpack, and my use of hiking poles.
       
      Regarding my guts (I assume you mean my hiking at night and/or sleeping outside?), I'd rather say that I have a view of nature as being safe and fun... rarely is it really scary or dangerous.  There's nothing out there at night that isn't there during the day, and I think the most dangerous thing in the wilderness is the bad decisions we can sometimes make.  Also, I planned the trip to coincide with a full moon, so I would have the option to hike at night.  My only light was a tiny LED light, so my night hiking was nearly always by moonlight.  By the way, I liked my light:  "Princeton Tec Impulse White LED", $10, 14 grams total weight.  Comes with a both hat clip and carabiner attachment options.
       
       
      wildtowner:
      Yes, I remember seeing you two on the trail, and I really enjoyed chatting with you.  I was surprised at how fun it was talking with folks out on the trail... it became a highlight of the trip for me.  How did your trip go?  Did you make it to North Lake?  Did you enjoy your trip?  Yes, I decided that lighter makes things better, but you can decide what you need to bring, tent etc.  Like I probably said on the trail, the lighter stuff can often be much cheaper than the heavy traditional stuff.  For me, only the new lightweight backpack, and a new lightweight sleeping bag, were the only expensive items.
       
       
      Take care everyone,
       
      Chris.
       
    • Chris Hauser
      Hi Kyle: Yes, the bivy has both a 24-inch zipper, and a draw string around the top.  The draw string will pull the top tight around your head.  Also, the top
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 13, 2013
        Hi Kyle:
         
        Yes, the bivy has both a 24-inch zipper, and a draw string around the top.  The draw string will pull the top tight around your head.  Also, the top of the bivy is uneven, just like a mummy sleeping bag, so you can have it match the shape of the sleeping bag if you want your face exposed, or you can flip it to create a hood to protect your head/face from the weather.  As with any bivy, you want to avoid breathing into the bag, which creates condensation.
         
        I slept on top of two pads, outside the bivy.  Before the trip, I tried sleeping in it with the pads inside, and I think that would have worked well, but I'm a side sleeper, so it kept me from curling up and getting comfortable.  I am a wimp when it comes to getting comfy in bed, so I use 2 pads:  a cheap blue closed-cell foam pad, plus a Thermarest ProLight pad that I got at an REI used gear sale for $5 (it had two leaks I fixed).  Also had an inflatable pillow.
         
        Chris.
         
         
         
        >Kyle Arn wrote:
        >
        >
        >Chris, did you use the Escape Bivy on top of your sleeping pad or is it big enough to put a pad and bag inside of it?  It looks pretty cool.  Does it have a zipper and a >drawstring for around your head?
        >
        ?Kyle
         
         
         


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