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Re: Campfires

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  • casey
    The question comes to mind. Why would you want to spend time sawing wood? Yosemite and other National Parks are recommending you don t use any firewood
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 8, 2013
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      The question comes to mind. Why would you want to spend time sawing wood? Yosemite and other National Parks are recommending you don't use any firewood larger than the diameter of your wrist. Dry sticks break easily when hit against a rock. Carrying a saw is as unnecessary as carrying a hatchet.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Mosack" <mosack@...> wrote:
      >
      > Why can’t one use a saw to cut downed wood to make it more manageable to carry/take to the fire?
      > Mike
      >
      > From: Terry
      > Sent: Saturday, September 07, 2013 10:45 AM
      > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Campfires
      >
      >
      > You should never be burning a fire in the backcountry that would require a saw. If there isn't plenty of downed wood around then a fire probably isn't prudent.
      >
    • Mike Mosack
      It really has nothing to do with wanting to spend time sawing wood. It’s more about hiking your own hike and not telling others how one should never be doing
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 8, 2013
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        It really has nothing to do with wanting to spend time sawing wood. It’s more about hiking your own hike and not telling others how one should never be doing something that unless there is a specific law or policy against it, is completely a personal choice. Obviously there are protected areas that NPS and other entities will have a say in what we can or can’t do in the wilderness. Certainly there are areas where the collection of wrist-sized wood is difficult to locate as it has been collected already. There are also areas where true backcountry is off trail and not visited by so many people and the possibility of a survival situation is something to consider in the gear list. Having a lightweight saw could be a legitimate consideration for some.
        There is an argument for an outdoor experience to include being self-sustaining; even if only for a week or more. Sawing wood might be more of a reality in that case. Personally, I prefer to take a stove and reduce my impact although admittedly I have never reached the level of true Leave No Trace enthusiasts. I guess I feel a little butt-hurt when I perceive postings where someone is projecting something as the only way when it is often really just their way.
        Mike
         
         
        From: casey
        Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2013 8:27 AM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Campfires
         
         

        The question comes to mind. Why would you want to spend time sawing wood? Yosemite and other National Parks are recommending you don't use any firewood larger than the diameter of your wrist. Dry sticks break easily when hit against a rock. Carrying a saw is as unnecessary as carrying a hatchet.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Mosack" <mosack@...> wrote:

        >
        > Why can’t one use a saw to cut downed wood to make it
        more manageable to carry/take to the fire?
        > Mike

      • johndittli
        Hi Mike I was a backcountry ranger for the NPS for many years, and I honestly can t remember this ever coming up. Nor can I seem to locate anything in the CFR
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 8, 2013
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          Hi Mike


          I was a backcountry ranger for the NPS for many years, and I honestly can't remember this ever coming up. Nor can I seem to locate anything in the CFR or compendiums. 


          I suppose a ranger could make a case out of "destruction of natural features", but I'm not sure it would stick with the magistrate.


          Where fires are allowed, you are asked to burn dead and downed wood. You are also asked to use smaller wood.


          The main thing about hacking or sawing small wood off of big wood is that it is unsightly, just as half burned large wood is; it leaves a "trace" of your passing that isn't confined to a camp or trail. If you're simply sawing larger wood to fit into a ring and all traces are turned to ash, then that's not an issue.


          While I don't have fires regularly, I certainly have had a few over the past 50 years- I've never found a need for a saw or an axe.


          Bottom line, I don't "think" it's illegal, but if a saw is necessary to gather wood, then a fire probably isn't appropriate at that time or place. 


          JD

          Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail  



          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          It really has nothing to do with wanting to spend time sawing wood. It’s more about hiking your own hike and not telling others how one should never be doing something that unless there is a specific law or policy against it, is completely a personal choice. Obviously there are protected areas that NPS and other entities will have a say in what we can or can’t do in the wilderness. Certainly there are areas where the collection of wrist-sized wood is difficult to locate as it has been collected already. There are also areas where true backcountry is off trail and not visited by so many people and the possibility of a survival situation is something to consider in the gear list. Having a lightweight saw could be a legitimate consideration for some.
          There is an argument for an outdoor experience to include being self-sustaining; even if only for a week or more. Sawing wood might be more of a reality in that case. Personally, I prefer to take a stove and reduce my impact although admittedly I have never reached the level of true Leave No Trace enthusiasts. I guess I feel a little butt-hurt when I perceive postings where someone is projecting something as the only way when it is often really just their way.
          Mike
           
           
          From: casey
          Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2013 8:27 AM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Campfires
           
           

          The question comes to mind. Why would you want to spend time sawing wood? Yosemite and other National Parks are recommending you don't use any firewood larger than the diameter of your wrist. Dry sticks break easily when hit against a rock. Carrying a saw is as unnecessary as carrying a hatchet.

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Mosack" <mosack@...> wrote:
          >
          > Why can’t one use a saw to cut downed wood to make it more manageable to carry/take to the fire?
          > Mike

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