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RE: Rim Fire abruptly ends my SOBO hike

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  • skrapp138
    One thing you might find (as I did) was I was little less obsessed / stressed the second time around. You know, honestly - my intuition feels this statement
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 1 11:04 PM
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       "One thing you might find (as I did) was I was little less obsessed / stressed the second time around."


      You know, honestly - my intuition feels this statement may be true. I actually went from feeling really bummed out yesterday, to today really looking forward to next year. All the planning has already been done - so I feel like I'll be much less stressed/pressured next year! I'm already looking forward to another shot at this trail and the chance that the biggest fire in state history won't ruin it next time!



      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <cjoslyn99@...> wrote:

      All I can say is try again next year.  2 years ago, I headed out in mid July among epic snows...the snows didn't get me but a badly twisted ankle did.  Last year I was able to complete w/o incident.  One thing you might find (as I did) was I was little less obsessed / stressed the second time around.



      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <forgetwho@...> wrote:

      I am so sorry...  and looking at the webcams and warnings on the YNP website, I am certain that you made the right decision.  I hiked in far less severe smoke a month ago (and mostly downhill on the worst day), and I felt the effects for days afterwards, even more than I realized at the time.  You are right to take both the short and long-term effects of the smoke seriously.


      There are many reasons to be heartbroken about this fire, and this - the scuttling of a year of planning, training, and obsessing - is one of them.  (Try to realize that all that planning and training hasn't been wasted.  It's done you good and will be useful next year, too.)



      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <xericamunsonx@...> wrote:

      After a year of planning i had to bail on Saturday morning from the trail. We left on the trail on Friday afternoon - when I woke up in the valley that morning it was clear blue skies - though the forecast was still for dense smoke. I talked to some rangers and staff and asked them about it and everyone blew me off "don't believe everything you read - the skies have been clear we haven't seen any smoke in the valley". Yet as we left for HI - the winds shifted and the smoky haze started getting thicker - by about 2 miles into the trail the smoke quickly poured in and obscured the sun. I immediately started having issues breathin. I had never had ANY respiratory issues so I was suspicious at first that it was the steep climb but I quickly could tell that it was the smoke. My hiking partner pushed me on (though I really didn't feel safe doing so).  we stayed the night at LYV and hoped it would clear up, but it got way worse - I felt like I was suffocating. I had what may have been a few minor asthma attacks - it was quite scary. In our headlamps we watched the ash fall like snow, and could see the visibility waning. The next morning the visibility was down to 50-100ft, and my tent was covered in ash. Even just sitting in camp I had trouble breathing. I found the ranger and he said I should turn back - his boss told him they had declared the conditions a "code purple" and they were even being told to not go outside if they  didn't have to, and not to exert physically. I debated whether to push the 20 miles to TM - yet he said conditions were worse there. he also explained that if I got much further up the trail and had a serious issue there would be nothing anyone could do. I made my decision to turn back. My hiking partner pushed ahead. When I got down the trail rangers were asking people to leave the trail and handing out smoke masks. The valley was a ghost town. I felt defeated after so much planning - but the trail will be here next year. At least I pushed my pride aside and made the safe decision. Stay safe - this fire is the biggest in the history of the Sierras, and will likely end up being the largest in state history when done. The ranger told me the fire would at least be burning until the end of the month and the smoke was supposed to be all the way to mammoth for at least a week (unless the wind shifts again)
    • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
      One thing you might find (as I did) was I was little less obsessed / stressed the second time around Well it is supposed to be a walk in the park . :-)
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 2 5:56 AM
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        "One thing you might find (as I did) was I was little less obsessed / stressed the second time around"

        Well it is supposed to be a 'walk in the park'. :-)
      • Roleigh Martin
        I m curious, did you consider the option of continuing the JMT by somehow getting to either Horseshoe Meadows (next trailhead south of Whitney) and doing your
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 2 8:21 AM
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          I'm curious, did you consider the option of continuing the JMT by somehow getting to either Horseshoe Meadows (next trailhead south of Whitney) and doing your JMT NOBO?  Getting there is no easy task with this Rim Fire but options have been given on this board.

          -------------------------------------------------
          Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
          _



          On Sun, Sep 1, 2013 at 9:47 PM, <xericamunsonx@...> wrote:
           

          After a year of planning i had to bail on Saturday morning from the trail. We left on the trail on Friday afternoon - when I woke up in the valley that morning it was clear blue skies - though the forecast was still for dense smoke. I talked to some rangers and staff and asked them about it and everyone blew me off "don't believe everything you read - the skies have been clear we haven't seen any smoke in the valley". Yet as we left for HI - the winds shifted and the smoky haze started getting thicker - by about 2 miles into the trail the smoke quickly poured in and obscured the sun. I immediately started having issues breathin. I had never had ANY respiratory issues so I was suspicious at first that it was the steep climb but I quickly could tell that it was the smoke. My hiking partner pushed me on (though I really didn't feel safe doing so).  we stayed the night at LYV and hoped it would clear up, but it got way worse - I felt like I was suffocating. I had what may have been a few minor asthma attacks - it was quite scary. In our headlamps we watched the ash fall like snow, and could see the visibility waning. The next morning the visibility was down to 50-100ft, and my tent was covered in ash. Even just sitting in camp I had trouble breathing. I found the ranger and he said I should turn back - his boss told him they had declared the conditions a "code purple" and they were even being told to not go outside if they  didn't have to, and not to exert physically. I debated whether to push the 20 miles to TM - yet he said conditions were worse there. he also explained that if I got much further up the trail and had a serious issue there would be nothing anyone could do. I made my decision to turn back. My hiking partner pushed ahead. When I got down the trail rangers were asking people to leave the trail and handing out smoke masks. The valley was a ghost town. I felt defeated after so much planning - but the trail will be here next year. At least I pushed my pride aside and made the safe decision. Stay safe - this fire is the biggest in the history of the Sierras, and will likely end up being the largest in state history when done. The ranger told me the fire would at least be burning until the end of the month and the smoke was supposed to be all the way to mammoth for at least a week (unless the wind shifts again)


        • skrapp138
          I thought about the NOBO option - but didn t because I was feeling so horrible from the smoke - I m starting to feel normal today but still have a pretty bad
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 2 12:17 PM
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            I thought about the NOBO option - but didn't because I was feeling so horrible from the smoke -  I'm starting to feel normal today but still have a pretty bad cough. I didn't want to risk trying to acclimate to the high elevation of the south end while not having strong lungs. 


            From looking around today, seems the smoke is back being blown to the north again! The valley is beautiful and clear! Seems I just had horrible timing this year! 



            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <roleigh@...> wrote:

            I'm curious, did you consider the option of continuing the JMT by somehow getting to either Horseshoe Meadows (next trailhead south of Whitney) and doing your JMT NOBO?  Getting there is no easy task with this Rim Fire but options have been given on this board.

            -------------------------------------------------
            Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
            _



            On Sun, Sep 1, 2013 at 9:47 PM, <xericamunsonx@...> wrote:
             

            After a year of planning i had to bail on Saturday morning from the trail. We left on the trail on Friday afternoon - when I woke up in the valley that morning it was clear blue skies - though the forecast was still for dense smoke. I talked to some rangers and staff and asked them about it and everyone blew me off "don't believe everything you read - the skies have been clear we haven't seen any smoke in the valley". Yet as we left for HI - the winds shifted and the smoky haze started getting thicker - by about 2 miles into the trail the smoke quickly poured in and obscured the sun. I immediately started having issues breathin. I had never had ANY respiratory issues so I was suspicious at first that it was the steep climb but I quickly could tell that it was the smoke. My hiking partner pushed me on (though I really didn't feel safe doing so).  we stayed the night at LYV and hoped it would clear up, but it got way worse - I felt like I was suffocating. I had what may have been a few minor asthma attacks - it was quite scary. In our headlamps we watched the ash fall like snow, and could see the visibility waning. The next morning the visibility was down to 50-100ft, and my tent was covered in ash. Even just sitting in camp I had trouble breathing. I found the ranger and he said I should turn back - his boss told him they had declared the conditions a "code purple" and they were even being told to not go outside if they  didn't have to, and not to exert physically. I debated whether to push the 20 miles to TM - yet he said conditions were worse there. he also explained that if I got much further up the trail and had a serious issue there would be nothing anyone could do. I made my decision to turn back. My hiking partner pushed ahead. When I got down the trail rangers were asking people to leave the trail and handing out smoke masks. The valley was a ghost town. I felt defeated after so much planning - but the trail will be here next year. At least I pushed my pride aside and made the safe decision. Stay safe - this fire is the biggest in the history of the Sierras, and will likely end up being the largest in state history when done. The ranger told me the fire would at least be burning until the end of the month and the smoke was supposed to be all the way to mammoth for at least a week (unless the wind shifts again)


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