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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Fences on Trail?

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  • John Ladd
    On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 7:42 AM, kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
    Message 1 of 25 , Aug 27 8:54 AM
      On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 7:42 AM, kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net <kenjessett@...> wrote:
      I expect any day now, John Ladd will offer to set-up a resupply depot along the bottom half of the trail using llamas to bring the food in. I can see him standing on the side of an escarpment wearing a kilt and playing the pipes to draw the curious traveller and seduce them with his ghee, pigs fat and other similarly horrible stuff.

      What a great idea. Maybe I could joint venture it with


      No, I haven't left town yet. Tomorrow morning. 23 days with gloriously no temptations to post excessively or again re-argue the benefits of lardo, ghee, pesto or confits

      Unfortunately, it may take me a while to learn how to play a bagpipe. Would an Irish flute do as well?

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • Barbara Karagosian
      Have a great time John!
      Message 2 of 25 , Aug 27 9:09 AM
        Have a great time John!



        On Aug 27, 2013, at 8:54 AM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

         

        On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 7:42 AM, kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net <kenjessett@...> wrote:
        I expect any day now, John Ladd will offer to set-up a resupply depot along the bottom half of the trail using llamas to bring the food in. I can see him standing on the side of an escarpment wearing a kilt and playing the pipes to draw the curious traveller and seduce them with his ghee, pigs fat and other similarly horrible stuff.

        What a great idea. Maybe I could joint venture it with


        No, I haven't left town yet. Tomorrow morning. 23 days with gloriously no temptations to post excessively or again re-argue the benefits of lardo, ghee, pesto or confits

        Unfortunately, it may take me a while to learn how to play a bagpipe. Would an Irish flute do as well?

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279

      • kennethjessett@sbcglobal.net
        I have to say,m that stuff look awful in the car. But enjoy it - and whistling will do as well. :-) Have a great time, and let us have your report when you
        Message 3 of 25 , Aug 27 9:16 AM
          I have to say,m that stuff look awful in the car. But enjoy it - and whistling will do as well. :-)

          Have a great time, and let us have your report when you return.

          Ken.


          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 7:42 AM, kennethjessett@... <kenjessett
          > @...> wrote:
          >
          > > I expect any day now, John Ladd will offer to set-up a resupply depot
          > > along the bottom half of the trail using llamas to bring the food in. I can
          > > see him standing on the side of an escarpment wearing a kilt and playing
          > > the pipes to draw the curious traveller and seduce them with his ghee, pigs
          > > fat and other similarly horrible stuff.
          >
          >
          > What a great idea. Maybe I could joint venture it with
          >
          > http://www.boccalone.com/
          >
          > [image: Inline image 1]
          >
          > No, I haven't left town yet. Tomorrow morning. 23 days with gloriously no
          > temptations to post excessively or again re-argue the benefits of lardo,
          > ghee, pesto or confits.
          >
          > Unfortunately, it may take me a while to learn how to play a bagpipe. Would
          > an Irish flute do as well?
          >
          > John Curran Ladd
          > 1616 Castro Street
          > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
          > 415-648-9279
          >
        • Jim Ringland
          A while back I was in McClure Meadow (Evolution Valley) and ended up chatting one evening with a packer who was supporting some park service work up at the
          Message 4 of 25 , Aug 27 9:49 AM

            A while back I was in McClure Meadow (Evolution Valley) and ended up chatting one evening with a packer who was supporting some park service work up at the Muir Hut.   Very interesting guy with some experiences that hikers may not get.  He was real interested to know if all the gates we saw coming in were closed.  He once had to chase his stock from McClure all the way down to the bridge across the South Fork of the San Joaquin down at the Goddard Canyon junction ... and then lead them back up.  He wasn't eager to repeat that. 

            Jim Ringland

             

            From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dittli-Goethals
            Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 8:36 PM
            To: JMT Yahoo Group
            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Fences on Trail?

             

             

            Some hikers will leave the gates open for various reasons, they should always be closed. If a packer arrives via a different trail, they don't check all the gates before letting the stock graze. If gates are left open, stock can wander off in some cases all the way back to the pack station. In other cases they can wander into fragile places there not supposed to be.

             

            On Mon, Aug 26, 2013 at 8:17 PM, Bill Heiser <bill@...> wrote:

            I was wondering ... what is the protocol for closing these gates?  I figured "leave it as I found it" is probably best. 

             

             

            <snip>

          • jamesrchristopherson
            When i worked for the Forest Service quite a while ago, if the packers wanted a gate left open they would wire it open so you knew it was to be left open,
            Message 5 of 25 , Aug 27 10:49 AM

              When i worked for the Forest Service quite a while ago, if the packers wanted a gate left open they would wire it open so you knew it was to be left open, something like barb wired tight with pliers so the average person would not be able to change it.  Otherwise it should always be closed, and never left open for any reason.  If you cant get it to completely close because your not strong enough, use a little rope and make it as secure as possible.

               

              At least thats what they told us. 



              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <jtringl@...> wrote:

              A while back I was in McClure Meadow (Evolution Valley) and ended up chatting one evening with a packer who was supporting some park service work up at the Muir Hut.   Very interesting guy with some experiences that hikers may not get.  He was real interested to know if all the gates we saw coming in were closed.  He once had to chase his stock from McClure all the way down to the bridge across the South Fork of the San Joaquin down at the Goddard Canyon junction ... and then lead them back up.  He wasn't eager to repeat that. 

              Jim Ringland

               

              From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dittli-Goethals
              Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 8:36 PM
              To: JMT Yahoo Group
              Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Fences on Trail?

               

               

              Some hikers will leave the gates open for various reasons, they should always be closed. If a packer arrives via a different trail, they don't check all the gates before letting the stock graze. If gates are left open, stock can wander off in some cases all the way back to the pack station. In other cases they can wander into fragile places there not supposed to be.

               

              On Mon, Aug 26, 2013 at 8:17 PM, Bill Heiser <bill@...> wrote:

              I was wondering ... what is the protocol for closing these gates?  I figured "leave it as I found it" is probably best. 

               

               

              <snip>

            • scriv.ener
              Most horses I follow seem to have infinitely long intestines.
              Message 6 of 25 , Aug 27 5:35 PM
                Most horses I follow seem to have infinitely long intestines.



                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                >
                > ... horses are a nuisance in the backcountry, just my opinion,
                > and yes I'm sure I'm in the minority on this.
                >
                > ...
                >
              • longritchie
                If a horse s intestines were of infinite length then it s first bowel movement would occur after an infinite amount of time passed. Most people would have
                Message 7 of 25 , Aug 27 5:42 PM
                  If a horse's intestines were of infinite length then it's first bowel movement would occur after an infinite amount of time passed. Most people would have finished the JMT before then.


                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "scriv.ener" <jeffreyz212@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Most horses I follow seem to have infinitely long intestines.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > ... horses are a nuisance in the backcountry, just my opinion,
                  > > and yes I'm sure I'm in the minority on this.
                  > >
                  > > ...
                  > >
                  >
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