Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

dry sack dimensions/stuff sack

Expand Messages
  • Jo T
    Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6 long/Wide). I m seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 22, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6' long/Wide).
      I'm seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in liters and I have no real percepton of what that means in terms the size of a sleeping quilt.
      Of course, I want to compress it as well but keep it dry.

      Any suggestions as to size?  Also, a recommended (reasonably priced) brand?

      Thanks,
      JoT.


    • John Ladd
      I like this compression dry sack a lot http://www.rei.com/product/730882/sea-to-summit-event-compression-dry-sack I tried an UL sack first but the tape that
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I like this compression dry sack a lot


        I tried an UL sack first but the tape that sealed the seams delaminated within a year of not particularly heavy use so I decided to get something a bit heavier.

        Unfortunately, mine is listed on a tag as "large" but it appears from the REI site that it is probably the 20 L size (costs $40). It handles a very warm winter down bag (about 30 oz of fill) without hardly any compression at all, or by adding some compression, would take the bag plus a down jacket (sweater-style) plus expedition weight fleece baselayer without a lot of over-compression.

        Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

        The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279


        On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 11:37 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
         

        Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6' long/Wide).
        I'm seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in liters and I have no real percepton of what that means in terms the size of a sleeping quilt.
        Of course, I want to compress it as well but keep it dry.

        Any suggestions as to size?  Also, a recommended (reasonably priced) brand?

        Thanks,
        JoT.



      • Jo T
        Thank you, John, that helps a lot. I wasn t aware you could overcompress a down bag-- this being my first non-synthetic bag. Btw, do you have a Trader Joe s in
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 23, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Thank you, John, that helps a lot. I wasn't aware you could overcompress a down bag-- this being my first non-synthetic bag.
          Btw, do you have a Trader Joe's in your neck of the woods?
          One of their new products (saw it for the first time this week AFTER I had already stocked up!) was ghee 8oz in plastic bottles. 3.99!

          Happy hiking!
          JoT.


          From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, August 23, 2013 12:23 AM
          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] dry sack dimensions/stuff sack

           
          I like this compression dry sack a lot


          I tried an UL sack first but the tape that sealed the seams delaminated within a year of not particularly heavy use so I decided to get something a bit heavier.

          Unfortunately, mine is listed on a tag as "large" but it appears from the REI site that it is probably the 20 L size (costs $40). It handles a very warm winter down bag (about 30 oz of fill) without hardly any compression at all, or by adding some compression, would take the bag plus a down jacket (sweater-style) plus expedition weight fleece baselayer without a lot of over-compression.

          Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

          The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279


          On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 11:37 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
           
          Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6' long/Wide).
          I'm seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in liters and I have no real percepton of what that means in terms the size of a sleeping quilt.
          Of course, I want to compress it as well but keep it dry.

          Any suggestions as to size?  Also, a recommended (reasonably priced) brand?

          Thanks,
          JoT.





        • Jo T
          My bag is the S-RevelationX ; 6 Long, WIDE 20* 24.75oz (14.9oz+I bought 2xtra oz) You did a good guess! JoT. ******************************   Enlightened
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 23, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            My bag is the S-RevelationX ; 6' Long, WIDE 20* 24.75oz (14.9oz+I bought 2xtra oz)
            You did a good guess!

            JoT.
            ******************************
             


            Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

            The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
            415-648-9279



          • John Ladd
            I d go with the 15 liter, esp. if you are also using it for a down vest or sweater. If it is a bit too big you could either compress it smaller or add things
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 23, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I'd go with the 15 liter, esp. if you are also using it for a down vest or sweater. If it is a bit too big you could either compress it smaller or add things like a bedtime baselayer or anything else compressible. If just the bag, my guess is that the 10 L would work without over compression.

              If you can go to a store, just bring the stuff with you. If mail ordering from REI, order the 10 and 15 and return the one you don't need.

              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
              415-648-9279


              On Fri, Aug 23, 2013 at 4:53 AM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
               

              My bag is the S-RevelationX ; 6' Long, WIDE 20* 24.75oz (14.9oz+I bought 2xtra oz)
              You did a good guess!

              JoT.
              ******************************
               


              Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

              The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

              John Curran Ladd
              1616 Castro Street
              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
              415-648-9279




            • John Ladd
              I do have a TJ in San Francisco, conveniently located within a block of our REI and about 5 blocks from a very good store for bulk produce (Rainbow Coop). I ve
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 24, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                I do have a TJ in San Francisco, conveniently located within a block of our REI and about 5 blocks from a very good store for bulk produce (Rainbow Coop). I've used the pre-made ghee from both TJ and Rainbow and they are both fine. (There's an expensive one at Rainbow that is particularly good, with a little caramelized flavor) But I hadn't known about the plastic bottles which makes it about as easy as one could imagine. Love the stuff.

                The problem with over compressing down is that you can do it, but the down tends to pick up a little moisture even without any tent condensation. Your body puts off some water vapor as you sleep, so there is a slight amount of water in the bag in the morning. The tighter you stuff it in a bag, esp if you don't air it out at a lunch stop, the more the moisture gets driven into the down and the bag can lose a little loft each day. The effect can be substantial across a trip. I don't have good data on this, but it is sure my impression.

                If I have to tightly compress a bag I try to hang it out to air and fluff in the breeze at a meal stop. Worth doing even without a lot of compression.

                John Curran Ladd
                1616 Castro Street
                San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                415-648-9279


                On Fri, Aug 23, 2013 at 4:37 AM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
                 

                Thank you, John, that helps a lot. I wasn't aware you could overcompress a down bag-- this being my first non-synthetic bag.
                Btw, do you have a Trader Joe's in your neck of the woods?
                One of their new products (saw it for the first time this week AFTER I had already stocked up!) was ghee 8oz in plastic bottles. 3.99!

                Happy hiking!
                JoT.


                From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, August 23, 2013 12:23 AM
                Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] dry sack dimensions/stuff sack

                 
                I like this compression dry sack a lot


                I tried an UL sack first but the tape that sealed the seams delaminated within a year of not particularly heavy use so I decided to get something a bit heavier.

                Unfortunately, mine is listed on a tag as "large" but it appears from the REI site that it is probably the 20 L size (costs $40). It handles a very warm winter down bag (about 30 oz of fill) without hardly any compression at all, or by adding some compression, would take the bag plus a down jacket (sweater-style) plus expedition weight fleece baselayer without a lot of over-compression.

                Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

                The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

                John Curran Ladd
                1616 Castro Street
                San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                415-648-9279


                On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 11:37 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
                 
                Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6' long/Wide).
                I'm seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in liters and I have no real percepton of what that means in terms the size of a sleeping quilt.
                Of course, I want to compress it as well but keep it dry.

                Any suggestions as to size?  Also, a recommended (reasonably priced) brand?

                Thanks,
                JoT.






              • Rich Luibrand
                JoT, Z-Packs has cuben fiber dry bags that would work well with your quilt. http://zpacks.com/accessories/dry_bags.shtml Rich
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 24, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  JoT,

                  Z-Packs has cuben fiber dry bags that would work well with your quilt.
                  http://zpacks.com/accessories/dry_bags.shtml

                  Rich


                  On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 7:54 AM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
                   

                  I do have a TJ in San Francisco, conveniently located within a block of our REI and about 5 blocks from a very good store for bulk produce (Rainbow Coop). I've used the pre-made ghee from both TJ and Rainbow and they are both fine. (There's an expensive one at Rainbow that is particularly good, with a little caramelized flavor) But I hadn't known about the plastic bottles which makes it about as easy as one could imagine. Love the stuff.

                  The problem with over compressing down is that you can do it, but the down tends to pick up a little moisture even without any tent condensation. Your body puts off some water vapor as you sleep, so there is a slight amount of water in the bag in the morning. The tighter you stuff it in a bag, esp if you don't air it out at a lunch stop, the more the moisture gets driven into the down and the bag can lose a little loft each day. The effect can be substantial across a trip. I don't have good data on this, but it is sure my impression.

                  If I have to tightly compress a bag I try to hang it out to air and fluff in the breeze at a meal stop. Worth doing even without a lot of compression.

                  John Curran Ladd
                  1616 Castro Street
                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                  415-648-9279


                  On Fri, Aug 23, 2013 at 4:37 AM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
                   

                  Thank you, John, that helps a lot. I wasn't aware you could overcompress a down bag-- this being my first non-synthetic bag.
                  Btw, do you have a Trader Joe's in your neck of the woods?
                  One of their new products (saw it for the first time this week AFTER I had already stocked up!) was ghee 8oz in plastic bottles. 3.99!

                  Happy hiking!
                  JoT.


                  From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, August 23, 2013 12:23 AM
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] dry sack dimensions/stuff sack

                   
                  I like this compression dry sack a lot


                  I tried an UL sack first but the tape that sealed the seams delaminated within a year of not particularly heavy use so I decided to get something a bit heavier.

                  Unfortunately, mine is listed on a tag as "large" but it appears from the REI site that it is probably the 20 L size (costs $40). It handles a very warm winter down bag (about 30 oz of fill) without hardly any compression at all, or by adding some compression, would take the bag plus a down jacket (sweater-style) plus expedition weight fleece baselayer without a lot of over-compression.

                  Enlightened sells quilts that cover a variety of lofts and down content so it's hard to answer your question. For fill weights in the vicinity of 15 oz (like their 20 degree Revelation bag in the size you mention), you'd probably get by fine with the 10 L size if the only thing going into the sack was the quilt. Maybe you could cram it into the 6 liter, but you'd be at risk of overcompressing the quilt. The 15 liter would give you some room to spare.

                  The 30 degree bag (same size) has 12 oz of fill, making the 6 L more possible and the 10L a bit safer.

                  John Curran Ladd
                  1616 Castro Street
                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                  415-648-9279


                  On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 11:37 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
                   
                  Needing some help regarding a dry sack/stuff sack for my down sleeping quilt (Enlightened equipment/6' long/Wide).
                  I'm seeing that most dry sacks show sizes in liters and I have no real percepton of what that means in terms the size of a sleeping quilt.
                  Of course, I want to compress it as well but keep it dry.

                  Any suggestions as to size?  Also, a recommended (reasonably priced) brand?

                  Thanks,
                  JoT.







                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.