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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Checking a canister

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  • Mike Mosack
    Hi Ravi , I have been traveling back and forth overseas for a few years now. Might I suggest this – You certainly can pack clothes or something in your
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 22, 2013
      Hi Ravi ,
      I have been traveling back and forth overseas for a few years now. Might I suggest this – You certainly can pack clothes or something in your Bearikade. TSA does a screen, but they are pretty good at detecting density and are quite familiar with discerning what is what and if something is suspicious or not. I expect you won’t have any problems with that.
       
      Secondly, I would pack it in the center so it has some padding all the way around it. Airlines baggage personnel are known for not being gentle. If you pack it without padding you’re taking a big chance it’ll be damaged.
       
      Third – definitely keep the lid loosened just enough so that air pressure can equalize inside the can. Keeping the lid on can protect the threads of the can as well. I doubt there would be a real problem with the can’s seal being damaged from a pressurization issue, but this is an easy thing to do to remove one more potential issue in flight. You can take the can onto the plane with you probably, but there is always the chance that you might get that one flight attendant or that very full plane where the can will not fit into the overly small “box” they rarely have people try to fit their carry on baggage into before they board. Just saying... I’d rather have mine packed well and not have to worry about it.
      Mike Mosack
       
       
      From: Gail
      Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 3:59 PM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Checking a canister
       
       


      Ravi, when my Bearikade was shipped to me from Wild Ideas earlier this summer, it arrived with a hole all the way through the cardboard box, the bubble wrap, and the Bearikade itself. (Allen at Wild Ideas replaced the can for me immediately.) I know this was a rare occurrence - Allen said that in 10 years he'd only had one other canister damaged in shipping and that was from a bullet hole - but if I were flying with my canister I would either protect it in the center of my duffel with clothes padding it or else I would actually carry it on the plane.

      Gail

      --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:

      >
      > I'm flying out tomorrow
      and have my Bearikade canister in the duffel bag at the very end, empty, and with the top unlocked. I'm assuming that keeping it empty will reduce the chances of the bag being inspected and having it unlocked should provide easy access if inspected. However, I am slightly concerned that the canister is exposed to damage since it is at the end of the duffel and is not closed tight. I can see how rough baggage handling could potentially damage the canister if it hits in the wrong way if thrown, for example. Does it sound like my approach makes sense or should I do something else - like closing it tight or maybe even carrying it on the plane?
      >
      > Other than this concern and hoping
      my bags arrive with me (I have one connection along the way) there isn't much more to do than wait to start walking!
      >

    • Mike Mosack
      Hi Ravi, Another very good idea is to add a note with your name and address on it. Place that inside your checked baggage which helps the airlines get any lost
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 22, 2013
        Hi Ravi,
        Another very good idea is to add a note with your name and address on it. Place that inside your checked baggage which helps the airlines get any lost baggage back to you should the worse happen there.
        Mike Mosack
         
      • ravi_jmt2013
        Gail and Mike, thanks for the advice on this. I repacked the canister in the middle of the duffel surrounded by softer items which seems more secure. I added
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 22, 2013
          Gail and Mike, thanks for the advice on this. I repacked the canister in the middle of the duffel surrounded by softer items which seems more secure. I added the painters tape, wrote a note to the TSA and taped a quarter to the lid as well. Really important to avoid damage. I have a custom size canister that barely fit my MTR resupply. Renting a Garcia from Yosemite at the last minute would definitely not work very well for my resupply plan!



          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Mosack" <mosack@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Ravi ,
          > I have been traveling back and forth overseas for a few years now. Might I suggest this â€" You certainly can pack clothes or something in your Bearikade. TSA does a screen, but they are pretty good at detecting density and are quite familiar with discerning what is what and if something is suspicious or not. I expect you won’t have any problems with that.
          >
          > Secondly, I would pack it in the center so it has some padding all the way around it. Airlines baggage personnel are known for not being gentle. If you pack it without padding you’re taking a big chance it’ll be damaged.
          >
          > Third â€" definitely keep the lid loosened just enough so that air pressure can equalize inside the can. Keeping the lid on can protect the threads of the can as well. I doubt there would be a real problem with the can’s seal being damaged from a pressurization issue, but this is an easy thing to do to remove one more potential issue in flight. You can take the can onto the plane with you probably, but there is always the chance that you might get that one flight attendant or that very full plane where the can will not fit into the overly small “box” they rarely have people try to fit their carry on baggage into before they board. Just saying... I’d rather have mine packed well and not have to worry about it.
          > Mike Mosack
          >
          >
          > From: Gail
          > Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 3:59 PM
          > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Checking a canister
          >
          >
          >
          > Ravi, when my Bearikade was shipped to me from Wild Ideas earlier this summer, it arrived with a hole all the way through the cardboard box, the bubble wrap, and the Bearikade itself. (Allen at Wild Ideas replaced the can for me immediately.) I know this was a rare occurrence - Allen said that in 10 years he'd only had one other canister damaged in shipping and that was from a bullet hole - but if I were flying with my canister I would either protect it in the center of my duffel with clothes padding it or else I would actually carry it on the plane.
          >
          > Gail
          >
          > --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I'm flying out tomorrow and have my Bearikade canister in the duffel bag at the very end, empty, and with the top unlocked. I'm assuming that keeping it empty will reduce the chances of the bag being inspected and having it unlocked should provide easy access if inspected. However, I am slightly concerned that the canister is exposed to damage since it is at the end of the duffel and is not closed tight. I can see how rough baggage handling could potentially damage the canister if it hits in the wrong way if thrown, for example. Does it sound like my approach makes sense or should I do something else - like closing it tight or maybe even carrying it on the plane?
          > >
          > > Other than this concern and hoping my bags arrive with me (I have one connection along the way) there isn't much more to do than wait to start walking!
          > >
          >
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