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Re: Can anyone do the JMT?

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  • debrabrownbear
    Gail, I completely agree with Ned. My husband and I are planning for 26 days from Tuolumne Meadows to Whitney Portal, about 7-8 mile days on average, and I
    Message 1 of 84 , Aug 8 5:32 PM
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      Gail, I completely agree with Ned. My husband and I are planning for 26 days from Tuolumne Meadows to Whitney Portal, about 7-8 mile days on average, and I plan on having a great cup of coffee every morning. :-)

      Debra

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Gail" <forgetwho@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sounds wonderful, Ned.
      >
      > Especially the part about waking up late to coffee, lol.
      >
      > Gail
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Tibbits" <ned@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Gail!
      > >
      > > Seriously, 6 miles per day is fantastic!!
      > >
      > > We do this sort of trip often as it allows us lots of time to take pictures, fish, explore side trails, climb a peak or two, wake up late to coffee, make camp early and watch the fish jump, and get used to the altitude.
      > >
      > >
      > > Ned Tibbits, Director
      > > Mountain Education
      > > www.mountaineducation.org
      > >
      > > From: Don Amundson
      > > Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 4:11 PM
      > > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Can anyone do the JMT?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Sent from my iPad
      > >
      > > On Aug 8, 2013, at 4:06 PM, "Gail" <forgetwho@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Thank you, John. Yes, if I try this again (and I've gotten so much support now that I'm leaning toward trying it again) I'll definitely address the shoulder and foot issues - either a different pack or better training or both for the shoulder, and non-goretex shoes plus water-crossing shoes for my feet. I've been thinking about the boot vs. trail runner question. I opted for the boots because I'd been over much of the trail in the past, particularly the southern all-above-timber portion, and I thought that boots would be better on rocks and boulders. Yet I know many people do the trail in trail runners. What I wore this time were Asola Goretex Styngers, a boot I've been quite happy with before this trip. I also have a pair of Vasque Breeze Low VST Trail Shoes that I bought two years ago, not goretex. They are definitely lighter than my Asolos, and they have a substantial vibram sole. Does anyone have experience with those shoes? (I'd be thinking about making them my main shoes, not using them for water crossings.)
      > >
      > > As for teaming up with someone else - maybe. I honestly don't know of anyone who'd want to average about 6 miles a day - not even counting layover days - though ;-).
      > >
      > > Hopefully your brother will slow down to a reasonable pace for him and be okay. (And he won't really be alone on the trail. During my 8 hiking days I don't think I was ever out of sight of another person for longer than 2 hours.)
      > >
      > > Thanks for the ideas...
      > >
      > > Gail
      > >
      > > --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, "JOHN Ross" <ross939@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hello, Gail: I'm reading this thread with lots of curiosity and some admiration for the two of you and the accounts you write of. My 58 year old brother is completing the JMT this Sunday. It started out as a 2-person trip with him and my 16 year old son. About 3 months prior to the trip, my son injured his ACL playing football. He attempted to continue training and push ahead with the hike. Against the doctor's, and my better judgement, I let him give it a try, even though I knew his knee was not 100%. He made it from Happy Isles to just past Mammoth, but ended it there, as h felt his knee was just too unstable.Once he was back home, I realized that perhaps he just bit off way more than he could chew with the JMT, combined with the first time ever being away from home, I think the knee provided a way out for him. I'm proud he made it as far as he did, and he will have his ACL surgically repaired, and when he's physically able, I hope to return back with him in a second attempt.
      > >
      > > > But, back to my brother, he is 58, and he continued on from Mammoth. I do worry about him out there alone. He's a former Marine with a lot of backpacking experience and has done the trail before, although never alone. Talking with him from Mammoth,I do believe the most challenging thing for him is learning how to slow down and hike the hike that his body is currently capable of. He took a pretty good fall coming down Donahue Pass, and himself even contemplated wrapping it up in Mammoth.
      > > >
      > > > Judging from your account, I believe your goal is obtainable. A couple of things I would consider fixing is the shoulder pain (created from your pack?), and definitely foot care, using a water glove type water shoe and keeping the shoes dry. Have you considered trail runner shoes over boots? I do think there are a large number of people out there, even on this forum, who similarly want to complete this endeavor but have No hiking companions willing to take on such a task. I'm betting there would be a good number of people out there who would enjoy teaming up with you on a second endeavor.
      > > >
      > > > Good Luck!
      > > >
      > > > --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, "john_friend" <yahoo@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Gail, I'm so sorry your trip didn't work out for you. I think you raise a couple of very good points in hindsight that I'd like to highlight for others.
      > > > >
      > > > > 1) Training for this hike means doing enough practice hikes with your specific gear that you know that you are capable of carrying the weight you will have in your exact pack for the desired mileage. Now, one can't always find the right slope and altitude for an ideal training hike, but I'd say that you must know that your gear at full load works for you for a desired daily mileage, even on flat land. FYI, I see here http://www.granitegearstore.com/Vapor-Ki-P7C7.aspx that this pack is recommended for "up to 30lb loads". I wonder if that had anything to do with your lack of comfort and painful shoulders?
      > > > >
      > > > > 2) Letting your feet get messed up is the quickest way off the trail (as many have found). In your case, I think you really needed to keep your boots/socks dry and never hike in your boots without socks. If you were not going to use rocks or logs to stay dry on the water crossings (which definitely adds a new challenge), then you probably needed to carry some sort of additional shoe that you could put on just for water crossings and keep your boots and socks dry. I carried sandals for this purpose, but only actually used them for water crossings twice (Evolution Creek between MTR and Muir Pass and Wallace Creek just before Crabtree Meadow) so they mostly became my preferred footwear in camp and when bathing. If a sandal isn't sturdy enough for you in these crossings, then you'd have to select and carry something more robust. For the JMT, I'd also recommend breathable (not Gortex) boots precisely because they dry faster if they accidentally get wet. I started a few mornings with wet boots (due to rain on the trail), but I always made sure I had dry socks and if my socks got wet from the wet boots, I'd switch socks after a few hours. Even if my boots started out wet, they were generally dry by mid-day just from wearing them. I learned on my trip that the #1 maintenance item for me was to make absolutely sure I had dry socks for the next day. Dry was more important than clean so if I could only have one of the two, I'd choose dry. Since I had six consecutive days of rain, I often had to modify my day's plan to make sure I had dry socks for the next day (washing and drying socks in the couple hours of sun when it popped out, constantly carrying socks on the outside of my backpack to dry them out, stopping at the first sign of rain to put my drying socks back in the dry bag, choosing not to wash dry socks that wouldn't have a chance to dry before I needed them the next day and so on. FYI, I also carried three pairs of socks to give me more permutations. I actually wished I had put a couple new pairs of socks in the MTR resupply as they take quite a beating on the trail.
      > > > >
      > > > > 3) I wonder if you could have been more successful with a lighter pack. It should be possible on the JMT to have a base weight (before water, fuel and food, but including bear container) of 16-18 lbs (it takes some serious lightweight work, but it should be doable). Add in 4 days of food and a 1/2 liter of water and that would put you around 25 lbs. I hear you on the difficulty in knowing how much water to carry on the climb out of Little Yosemite. We had the same issue (carried more water than required because of the unknown availability). As our trip progressed, we got better at tanking up at a water stop (e.g. drinking a liter of water rather than carrying it) and at learning from hikers going the other direction about water availability.
      > > > >
      > > > > 4) You didn't say much about food, but with how challenged you were to put in your desired mileage, are you sure you were getting the right amount and type of food and were you eating throughout the day? An appropriate amount of calories spread through out the day and an appropriate amount of total protein are the two biggest measures.
      > > > >
      > > > > --John
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, "Gail" <forgetwho@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Well, yes and no. I'm 70 years old, and I've just failed in my attempt to thru-hike the JMT. My failure surprised me, and I'm still trying to sort out why it happened....
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • PETER GREENE
      I also live in Houston and have been section hiking the JMT for the last two years and do my last section leaving Wednesday. I do 90 floors of stairs per day
      Message 84 of 84 , Aug 12 3:32 PM
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        I also live in Houston and have been section hiking the JMT for the last two years and do my last section leaving Wednesday. I do 90 floors of stairs per day to get in shape for the hills. It will help if you have your pack on when you do the stairs to work on your legs. I also ride a bike 5 to 6 hours a week for cardio. The stairs will make a big difference on the hills. Good luck!


        From: rgbpc2013 <rgbpc2013@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:58 PM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Can anyone do the JMT?

         
        Not joking. Galleria parking garage twice a week--132 steps basement to top floor, 10 trips up & down. Also hike 5 miles 2 times a week, personal trainer at YMCA 2 times per week, 10 mile hike every couple of weeks. Been doing this for several months now (but for personal trainer--did weight training on my own until last month). Will start walking with loaded backpack this week. I've got 2 months & it'll have to do. I think it will.

        I know what you mean about needing to lose more weight. I'm down to 205 & need to be at 185 or 190, like you. We'll get there.

        Thanks for the suggestion of the HST, but I'm locked into the GC hike.

        FYI, it's down from N rim to Cottonwood campground day 1, hike to Bright Angel campground day 2, begin ascent of S rim day 3, but camp at Indian Garden then complete ascent day 4.

        Thank you again.

        Bob Bailey

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Carolsteveyoung <carolsteveyoung@...> wrote:
        >
        > Unless you are joking about the parking garage stairs any hike down into the canyon and back sounds dubious.
        >
        > Why not consider High Sierra Trail which is approx 70 miles and is similar territory to the JMT? That might be Better lead up to a JMT expedition. Kudos on getting into shape!
        >
        > I'm a decent hiker, but over 200 lb at age 58. I'm fit but would be more so if I were below 190. It's getting harder and harder to convince myself that it's all muscle.
        >
        > Steve Young
        > Geneva IL
        >
        >
        > On Aug 11, 2013, at 8:32 AM, "rgbpc2013" <rgbpc2013@...> wrote:
        >
        > > My GC hike will be with a guide. Already locked in. 4 days from north rim to south. I wanted to go with a guide, because they're trained in first aid. I'm going with my brother-in-law and another friend. all of us over 60, and it just seemed like the smart thing to do.
        > >
        > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, tombuchta <no_reply@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I'm your age (even from Houston originally) and have hiked both the JMT and many trails in the GC. The rim to rim could be much tougher on legs and feet than anything on the JMT IMOP unless you take several days to do it. I recently completed a 7 day trip that involved going down to the river via the Tanner trail in the GC and just about ruined my feet in shoes that served me well on the JMT in 2012.
        > > >
        > > > I would even suggest a GC trip that didnt involve going all the way down to the river. Something like a loop down the BA trail to Indian Garden, camp; then over to Monument Ck, camp; then to Hermit or Boucher ck, camp, and then up and out to Hermits rest. There is water at all the camps and elevation gain/loss is not quite so great.
        > > >
        > > > In any case both places are spectacular.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "rgbpc2013" <rgbpc2013@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I'm new to the group and am very interested in this discussion. I'm 63 and got interested in hiking the JMT when a friend of mine asked if anyone wanted to do it. I said yes, got serious about it and have lost 30+ lbs & am turning into an exercise maniac, well sort of. I live in HOuston, so there is no elevation change to speak of. I'm shooting for 2015 for the hike. I'm testing myself on a rim-to-rim of the Grand Canyon in October and have started going up parking garage stairs.
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        >



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