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Re: [John Muir Trail] Solo vs. Two

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  • kent.mclemore
    Fascinating discussion. Pace control is one reason I generally prefer to hike solo. If anything, i hike more slowly than my prospective JMT partner.
    Message 1 of 42 , Aug 1, 2013
      Fascinating discussion. Pace control is one reason I generally prefer to hike solo. If anything, i hike more slowly than my prospective JMT partner.


      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "john_friend" <yahoo@...> wrote:
      >
      > In a related note, on my JMT hike (completed yesterday), I discovered on my own that I was most effective on high altitude climbs if I slowed my pace down to a pace that I could go almost indefinitely without stopping. At first, it felt really slow, but after awhile it felt quite liberating like "I can climb anything at this pace" which was really helpful with the psychological aspects on the hike. It is much easier to do this when hiking solo (I was solo on the 2nd half of my trip) because you can truly find your own pace without influence by others.
      >
      > A slight increase above that pace (which is obviously influenced by the difficulty of terrain and altitude) would require frequent stops to both catch my breath and relieve muscle ache.
      >
      > I'm not advocating that you don't rest at all during a long climb, but I personally found a slower pace (than I would have expected) to be more productive when I was hiking solo. Once I discovered this, I can only remember being passed by other hikers once on a long climb and that's when I stopped for an extended food/water break at what I knew was the last water source for awhile.
      >
      > --John
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Don -- It's US Army research, as usual. Relatively small changes in pace
      > > (below about 25-30% of VO2MAX) can significantly extend the time to
      > > exhaustion and allow you to hike longer days. I agree one could chose to
      > > walk fast and end early. But due to the slope of the curve, there's a point
      > > where increased pace will decrease the hours you can walk rather sharply
      > > more than it will increase your speed.
      > >
      > > My point was only that hiking and talking tends to make you walk at below
      > > 25% of VO2MAX. It's the point behind the recommendation to hike at a pace
      > > where you can say the Pledge of Allegiance out loud comfortably.
      > >
      > > [image: Inline image 1]
      > >
      > > It's from Table 4-2 from
      > >
      > > http://armypubs.army.mil/med/dr_pubs/dr_a/pdf/tbmed505.pdf
      > >
      > > Colin Fletcher (Man Who Walked Through Time, Complete Walker) also wrote
      > > that most common mistake of new backpackers is walking too fast.
      > >
      > > Experienced hikers tend to find the point (mph and hours) that works for
      > > them, as I am sure you have. I'm not trying to change the hiking habits of
      > > people who have found their own sweet spot.
      > >
      > > But I think novices often walk too fast for their own good. So do people
      > > who try to keep up with the pace of others who perhaps can maintain it. You
      > > can end up falling exhausted into camp at mid-afternoon. No one should have
      > > to to hike to exhaustion (ruins appetite, if nothing else) and many find
      > > twilight hiking the best part of the day.
      > >
      > > I assume others will disagree. But it is my experience. I find I have to
      > > slow down consciously unless I am walking and talking. I am not the only
      > > one to find this true (see the common Pledge of Allegiance advice). I
      > > agree, of course, that the appropriate pace is strongly dependent on most
      > > of the factors you list in your post (elevation, slope, weather, etc).
      > >
      > > John Curran Ladd
      > > 1616 Castro Street
      > > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
      > > 415-648-9279
      > >
      > >
      > > On Wed, Jul 31, 2013 at 11:12 AM, Don Amundson <amrowinc@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > John L. said: "Hiking alone can tempt you to hike too fast which can
      > > > increases mph at the cost of miles per day."
      > > > -------------------------
      > > >
      > > > This is a new one on me. Has this been your own experience John? My
      > > > experience is that when hiking solo I hike at a speed dictated by the
      > > > conditions at the time. Weather, altitude, attitude,uphill/downhill,
      > > > incentive at days end (a burger) etc. I've never experienced a "cost of
      > > > miles per day" factor. Even if one does how do the numbers work? It
      > > > you're hiking a 2 miles per hour for 6 hours you do 12 miles. If you're
      > > > speedy and doing 3 miles per hour for only 4 hours you still do 12 miles.
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Aaron Tjogas
      Hi to the group Re: Permit Get there early! I always stay the night at the doors step. People can show at 2am to claim their spot in line. You can stay
      Message 42 of 42 , Aug 2, 2013
        Hi to the group
        Re: Permit
        Get there early!  I always stay the night at the doors step.  People can show at 2am to claim their spot in line.  You can stay there overnight as long as you don't "sleep".  I've been approached by rangers at 3am and they said I was ok to stay but I couldn't sleep.  I kindly say I'm not sleep and when they leave I fall back to sleep in my sleeping bag.
        Have fun!
        Aaron

        On Aug 2, 2013, at 8:14 AM, "sriprank" <sriprank@...> wrote:

         

        I would suggest when you arrive in YV go directly to the Permit Office and wait. They start issuing next day permits at 11:00 AM. Then (with Permit in hand) you will be legal to camp in the Backpackers Campground. These Permits go very fast. If you wait till the following day you may not get one.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Larry Beck <becklaurence@...> wrote:
        >
        > Brian,
        >
        > Go to the Yosemite Village ranger station the morning of your hike. When you arrive in Yosemite on Aug 10 go to North Pines and camp in the backpackers camp for $5 and then take the shuttle to Yosemite Village the next morning to get your permit. When you camp in the backpackers camp be sure to have your bus ticket stub because arriving by bus gives you the right to camp there (but you still have to pay the $5). The next morning, once you have the permit you can take the shuttle back to Happy Isles and hit the trail. It's only about 4-5 miles to Little Yosemite Valley.
        >  
        > Larry
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Brian Ding <brian_ding@...>
        > To: "johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Thursday, August 1, 2013 8:16 PM
        > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Where to get my wilderness permit in Yosemite Valley?
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        >
        > Hi, folks,
        > I was wondering where to get my reserved wilderness permit in Yosemite Valley? YVC? I will started thru hiking JMT on Aug. 11. I am leaving in Jack London Square, Oakland to take Amtrak(transferring in Merced) and bus combination to Yosemite Visitor Center(YVC) on Aug. 10. Then I guess I have to register camping for the night before. Can I get the wildness permit starting from the next day? 
        > My first night will be in Little Yosemite Valley. Is it safe to leave my tent and pack in LYV? I heard about concerts of losing gears.. 
        > Thanks for any answers and suggestions!
        >
        > Brian
        > Aug. 11(Happy Isles) - Sept 1(Whitney Portal), Solo
        >

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