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Re: Hiking JMT On August 9 . Any.suggestion/partner?

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  • Myo
    John thank you very much, I have never think that way.. Thanks to you, I need to rethink about my gears.. The experience from the article is nasty ... I wish I
    Message 1 of 35 , Jul 30 3:05 PM
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      John thank you very much, I have never think that way..

      Thanks to you, I need to rethink about my gears..

      The experience from the article is nasty ... I wish I don't get Snow-Storm in August but who know right?..
      Is there any chance to get Snow-Storm in August?
      For the stove, I don't know much ... if the one I have is not allow; I probably bring the Jet Boil.

      Correct me if I am wrong

      -I need a rain gear + gloves
      -More layers
      -change stove
      Anything else??


      Thank you for your great advice..

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 1:55 PM, Myo <myomgmgtun@...> wrote:
      >
      > > cooking kit(stove+windscreen+pot) = 5 oz
      >
      >
      > Is this a legal stove for this year? Alcohol stoves not permitted. I
      > suppose there are legal stove/pot combinations that use canister fuel, but
      > the low weight motivates the question.
      >
      > > tarp = 7.4 oz
      > > ground sheet+poncho =5.1 oz (probably leave this/depend on)
      > > 30* sleeping beg = 15 oz
      > > sleeping pad= 9 oz
      >
      > You may get pretty cold at night with the gear you describe and I'd
      > certainly bringing water protection for a trip that might extend into
      > mid-September.
      >
      > Nights could well be in mid-20s and it would be the rare 15 ounce sleeping
      > bag that could handle that temperature without a lot of insulation layers
      > to wear inside the bag and a good shelter outside it. If the temperature
      > rating you have is not based on the standardized EN system I'd take it with
      > a grain of salt.
      >
      > Esp. if your insulation layers (esp. down) get wet in rain (e.g., you get
      > wind driven rain under the poncho or you leave it home), a 25 degree night
      > maybe be miserable (at least) and if you get hypothermic and you are solo,
      > you could be in a world of hurt since the hypothermia can drive you to do
      > stupid things. (Hypothermic people often think they are getting overheated
      > and strip off all their clothes)
      >
      > I'd also bring cold and water protection for your hands so that you can
      > light your stove, set up your tarp, etc. If you hands don't work due to
      > cold you might not even be able to close a zipper. There was a guy who had
      > a trail account earlier this year who let his hands get so cold (in cold
      > rain) that he could not get his zippers to close.
      >
      > I am not saying that you *will* run into cold or cold-wet weather, but it
      > is not all that unlikely either, esp.. if your trip extends well into
      > September.
      >
      > You might want to read this account by a solo PCT hiker who was
      > underequipped for weather
      >
      > http://postholer.com/journal/viewJournal.php?sid=d55df2b4dcf9fd4ae11c2044fabd28e5&entry_id=8688
      >
      > I suppose I sound like a scare-monger but you are definitely pushing the
      > envelope with the gear your describe. There are experienced people who
      > surprise me with how readily they handle extreme conditions with minimal
      > gear. But unless you have done something in coldish-wetish weather already
      > with this kind of gear, I'd strongly consider more protection from cold and
      > from rain.
      >
      > John Curran Ladd
      > 1616 Castro Street
      > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
      > 415-648-9279
      >
    • Wilderness
      I recently hiked a pygmy promenade of the PCT (Carson Pass to Donner Summit). The Eldorado NF told me (perhaps in error?) that my alcohol stove was OK. There
      Message 35 of 35 , Aug 1, 2013
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        I recently hiked a pygmy promenade of the PCT (Carson Pass to Donner Summit). The Eldorado NF told me (perhaps in error?) that my alcohol stove was OK. There seems to be lots of confusion about which stoves are allowed. Be careful out there.
        Like Ravi, I have an ULA Catalyst. I figured out a way to determine the maximum length of a Bearikade (custom length) for your pack (horizontal fit, works with vertical alignment too). Tell me if you want the solution (no, not you, Ravi, we already had this discussion).
        For a Catalyst, the max is 11.25", yielding 700 ci of capacity, same as a BV500.
        I'll work on a trip report, which will eventually appear at:

        http://wildernessvagabond.com/reports.htm

        have fun out there,

        Rob of the WV

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Myo" <myomgmgtun@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Well then I will carry small clear plastic bear can from REI.
        > > (2.1 pounds !!!)
        >
        > For less weight, you can carry a Bearikade Weekender which is more likely to fit all of your food.
        >
        > I have a custom Bearikade (12 inches tall) that I test packed some time ago with the volume of food I plan to carry south of MTR. I actually had room to spare and I suspect that I could fit everything into a Weekender if I had to although the custom size gives me more flexibility for not much more weight and still fits into my pack.
        >
        > I just noticed that Wild Ideas may be running out of rental canisters, so best to check with them soon if you are interested in renting:
        >
        > https://www.wild-ideas.net/rent-a-bearikade/
        >
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