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JMT in mid June?

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  • Jon Shannon
    Hello all: OK, so I d asked earlier about starting the JMT in early July; and I appreciate the help given. I understand that snow melt usually is peak around
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 16, 2009
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      Hello all:

      OK, so I'd asked earlier about starting the JMT in early July; and I
      appreciate the help given. I understand that snow melt usually is peak
      around early July (which equates to dicier stream crossings, heavy
      mosquitos, etc).

      However, there's been a change, and it looks like we've got to start
      mid June (June 11th to be exact). We were thinking that PCTers
      probably would have been through or going through by about that time?

      Has anyone done the JMT this early? What can we expect in the passes
      and streams? Should we expect considerable snow in places in addition
      to the passes?

      Appreciate any input.

      Jon
    • Robert W. Freed
      Actually the heaviest snow melt is in June most years. I would say the only real difficult stream crossing is Evolution Creek. Most of the other
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 17, 2009
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        Actually the heaviest snow melt is in June most years. I would say the only real difficult stream crossing is Evolution Creek. Most of the other dangerous water crossings have been bridged. If you plan on crossing early in the day it usually helps. The water level rises with the sun's warming rays. Be prepared for snow and ice on the passes. Especially north facing slopes. Most PCT'ers carry a ice ax and the knowledge on how to self arrest. Crampons would not be wrong. The snow melts during the day and freezes again at night making for some real dangerous conditions. You will need a strategy for attacking the passes. I like using screws in my shoes and going early in the day to stay on top of the ice. Others prefer waiting until later in the day when the snow softens. There are several outfits that will teach snow travel in the area. Practicing with a ice ax is a skill you want to learn before you are on the trail.
         
        Of course every year is different. In 2005 in June there was barley any snow even on the passes. In 2008 snow was still heavy on north facing slopes late into July. We must all wait until April before we can get a clear forecast for the upcoming season. Check out www.postholer.com for all kinds of great info. Click on PCT to see the historical and predicted snow data.
         
        Robert
         
        Robert

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Prapanna Smith
        Actually, I found Bear Creek much more difficult and dicey than Evolution Creek. One can cross Evolution Creek by taking the use trail south from the mapped
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 17, 2009
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          Actually, I found Bear Creek much more difficult and dicey than
          Evolution Creek. One
          can cross Evolution Creek by taking the use trail south from the
          mapped crossing to
          just south of the creek's S-curve at the North end of Evolution Meadow
          and cross there.
          It's wider and in spots can be deeper, but the current is very slow
          there.

          Also, 2005 was probably the heaviest snow year since 1998. I did the
          JMT in July-
          August and every pass was deep in snow. Bear Creek had a very strong
          current late
          in the day, but was doable. Here's a picture of me crossing Bear Creek.

          Prapanna




          On Jan 17, 2009, at 7:55 AM, Robert W. Freed wrote:

          > Actually the heaviest snow melt is in June most years. I would say
          > the only real difficult stream crossing is Evolution Creek. Most of
          > the other dangerous water crossings have been bridged. If you plan
          > on crossing early in the day it usually helps. The water level rises
          > with the sun's warming rays. Be prepared for snow and ice on the
          > passes. Especially north facing slopes. Most PCT'ers carry a ice ax
          > and the knowledge on how to self arrest. Crampons would not be
          > wrong. The snow melts during the day and freezes again at night
          > making for some real dangerous conditions. You will need a strategy
          > for attacking the passes. I like using screws in my shoes and going
          > early in the day to stay on top of the ice. Others prefer waiting
          > until later in the day when the snow softens. There are several
          > outfits that will teach snow travel in the area. Practicing with a
          > ice ax is a skill you want to learn before you are on the trail.
          >
          > Of course every year is different. In 2005 in June there was barley
          > any snow even on the passes. In 2008 snow was still heavy on north
          > facing slopes late into July. We must all wait until April before we
          > can get a clear forecast for the upcoming season. Check out www.postholer.com
          > for all kinds of great info. Click on PCT to see the historical and
          > predicted snow data.
          >
          > Robert
          >
          > Robert
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Prapanna Smith
          Actually, I found Bear Creek much more difficult and dicey than Evolution Creek. One can cross Evolution Creek by taking the use trail south from the mapped
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 17, 2009
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            Actually, I found Bear Creek much more difficult and dicey than
            Evolution Creek. One
            can cross Evolution Creek by taking the use trail south from the
            mapped crossing to
            just south of the creek's S-curve at the North end of Evolution Meadow
            and cross there.
            It's wider and in spots can be deeper, but the current is very slow
            there.

            Also, 2005 was probably the heaviest snow year since 1998. I did the
            JMT in July-
            August and every pass was deep in snow. Bear Creek had a very strong
            current late
            in the day, but was doable. Here's a picture of me crossing Bear Creek.

            Prapanna




            On Jan 17, 2009, at 7:55 AM, Robert W. Freed wrote:

            > Actually the heaviest snow melt is in June most years. I would say
            > the only real difficult stream crossing is Evolution Creek. Most of
            > the other dangerous water crossings have been bridged. If you plan
            > on crossing early in the day it usually helps. The water level rises
            > with the sun's warming rays. Be prepared for snow and ice on the
            > passes. Especially north facing slopes. Most PCT'ers carry a ice ax
            > and the knowledge on how to self arrest. Crampons would not be
            > wrong. The snow melts during the day and freezes again at night
            > making for some real dangerous conditions. You will need a strategy
            > for attacking the passes. I like using screws in my shoes and going
            > early in the day to stay on top of the ice. Others prefer waiting
            > until later in the day when the snow softens. There are several
            > outfits that will teach snow travel in the area. Practicing with a
            > ice ax is a skill you want to learn before you are on the trail.
            >
            > Of course every year is different. In 2005 in June there was barley
            > any snow even on the passes. In 2008 snow was still heavy on north
            > facing slopes late into July. We must all wait until April before we
            > can get a clear forecast for the upcoming season. Check out www.postholer.com
            > for all kinds of great info. Click on PCT to see the historical and
            > predicted snow data.
            >
            > Robert
            >
            > Robert
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jon Shannon
            Thanks guys, I appreciate the input. Good food for thought. Jon
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 17, 2009
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              Thanks guys, I appreciate the input. Good food for thought.

              Jon
            • hmdsierra
              I agree. When my son and I did JMT in august 82 it was a big snow year and we had snow on almost every pass. We went a bit upstream from the Evolution
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 17, 2009
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                I agree. When my son and I did JMT in august '82 it was a big snow
                year and we had snow on almost every pass. We went a bit upstream
                from the Evolution crossing and waded to the other side. Bear Creek
                was made easy for us due to the fact that the island just downstream
                from the trail crossing had a fallen tree on each side of the island
                and we used it. The next year we returned to Bear Creek and spent a
                few days at the crossing. One of the logs was gone so we had no
                bridge. After looking at it for a couple of days we waded across,
                without packs, and it was COLD, deep and fast. It was July and Marie
                Lake was still mostly frozen. I wqas haoot to have had the log
                bridges the previous year. All the other creeks had logs to cross on
                iy you looked above and below the crossing. At the S. Fork Kings
                another hiker was wading but we found one of those logs just a little
                upstream that we used.

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Prapanna Smith
                <prapanna.smith@...> wrote:
                >
                > Actually, I found Bear Creek much more difficult and dicey than
                > Evolution Creek. One
                > can cross Evolution Creek by taking the use trail south from the
                > mapped crossing to
                > just south of the creek's S-curve at the North end of Evolution Meadow
                > and cross there.
                > It's wider and in spots can be deeper, but the current is very slow
                > there.
                >
                > Also, 2005 was probably the heaviest snow year since 1998. I did the
                > JMT in July-
                > August and every pass was deep in snow. Bear Creek had a very strong
                > current late
                > in the day, but was doable. Here's a picture of me crossing Bear Creek.
                >
                > Prapanna
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > On Jan 17, 2009, at 7:55 AM, Robert W. Freed wrote:
                >
                > > Actually the heaviest snow melt is in June most years. I would say
                > > the only real difficult stream crossing is Evolution Creek. Most of
                > > the other dangerous water crossings have been bridged. If you plan
                > > on crossing early in the day it usually helps. The water level rises
                > > with the sun's warming rays. Be prepared for snow and ice on the
                > > passes. Especially north facing slopes. Most PCT'ers carry a ice ax
                > > and the knowledge on how to self arrest. Crampons would not be
                > > wrong. The snow melts during the day and freezes again at night
                > > making for some real dangerous conditions. You will need a strategy
                > > for attacking the passes. I like using screws in my shoes and going
                > > early in the day to stay on top of the ice. Others prefer waiting
                > > until later in the day when the snow softens. There are several
                > > outfits that will teach snow travel in the area. Practicing with a
                > > ice ax is a skill you want to learn before you are on the trail.
                > >
                > > Of course every year is different. In 2005 in June there was barley
                > > any snow even on the passes. In 2008 snow was still heavy on north
                > > facing slopes late into July. We must all wait until April before we
                > > can get a clear forecast for the upcoming season. Check out
                www.postholer.com
                > > for all kinds of great info. Click on PCT to see the historical and
                > > predicted snow data.
                > >
                > > Robert
                > >
                > > Robert
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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