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Lightweight (old) paperbacks

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  • ravi_jmt2013
    There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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      There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.

      However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).

      My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.

      Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.

      Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
    • straw_marmot
      ipod nano = 1.0 oz headphones = 0.3 oz In this model they have dramatically extended battery life. My experience has been 25-30 hours life from the integrated
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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        ipod nano = 1.0 oz
        headphones = 0.3 oz

        In this model they have dramatically extended battery life. My experience has been 25-30 hours life from the integrated (i.e. weight included in the 1oz) rechargeable batteries.

        Subscribe to audible.com
        A vast number of books of all genres are now available in audio format, most unabridged. I think I average about $7 per full-length book with the subscription.

        No flashlight required to read, significant battery saving. And I find it much more comfortable to lie back in bed to listen to a book than to prop yourself up reading a book.

        all the best
        Ralph



        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
        >
        > There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.
        >
        > However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).
        >
        > My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.
        >
        > Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.
        >
        > Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
        >
      • Robert
        I m still partial to paperbacks myself. I will find a thick paperback that is a bit beat up already at a used bookstore for a cheap price, usually about a
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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          I'm still partial to paperbacks myself. I will find a thick paperback that is a bit beat up already at a used bookstore for a cheap price, usually about a $1.00 or less. I cut the bindings into sections based on the length of my trips and/or points between resupplies and just read smaller sections. Normally I just burn the read pages if I am a spot where campfires are allowed, but would be out of luck this summer on that. You may have to put a little tape on the front page and binding to hold it on.

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
          >
          > There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.
          >
          > However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).
          >
          > My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.
          >
          > Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.
          >
          > Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
          >
        • Gail
          Though I much prefer the feel of a real book, I m taking my Kindle (and I m mailing myself a charger in my resupply - theoretically I could send that home from
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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            Though I much prefer the feel of a real book, I'm taking my Kindle (and I'm mailing myself a charger in my resupply - theoretically I could send that home from MTR, though). I've loaded the Wenk book onto the Kindle along with several free books by John Muir and various documents of my own (my resupply lists, planned itinerary, contents of my first aid kit, etc.). I plan to add 2-3 other books to it before I leave. I should be able to read whatever I feel like on a given night...

            It should be at least a wash as far as weight is concerned. And I can read a Kindle lying down in a tent more easily than I could read a physical book. But I may regret my choice - physical books are comforting.

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
            >
            > There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.
            >
            > However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).
            >
            > My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.
            >
            > Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.
            >
            > Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
            >
          • ravi_jmt2013
            ... That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:
              >
              > ipod nano = 1.0 oz
              > headphones = 0.3 oz
              >

              That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening might be easier to do in the evening in a dark tent compared to reading a book. But I suspect that most of my reading will be during the day. I don't have a very aggressive schedule in terms of miles per day and if my training hikes are any indication, I probably will only hike for six hours each day on average. That's going to leave a lot of downtime.
            • Joe MacLeish
              Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude. Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                Joe

                 

                From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ravi_jmt2013
                Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 6:19 PM
                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Lightweight (old) paperbacks

                 

                 

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:

                >
                > ipod nano = 1.0 oz
                > headphones = 0.3 oz
                >

                That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening might be easier to do in the evening in a dark tent compared to reading a book. But I suspect that most of my reading will be during the day. I don't have a very aggressive schedule in terms of miles per day and if my training hikes are any indication, I probably will only hike for six hours each day on average. That's going to leave a lot of downtime.

              • Joe MacLeish
                by the by this post took less than 10 seconds to show up from the time I sent it From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                  by the by this post took less than 10 seconds to show up from the time I sent it

                   

                  From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joe MacLeish
                  Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 7:40 PM
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] Weather by altitude

                   

                   

                  Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                  Joe

                   

                  From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ravi_jmt2013
                  Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 6:19 PM
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Lightweight (old) paperbacks

                   

                   

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:

                  >
                  > ipod nano = 1.0 oz
                  > headphones = 0.3 oz
                  >

                  That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening might be easier to do in the evening in a dark tent compared to reading a book. But I suspect that most of my reading will be during the day. I don't have a very aggressive schedule in terms of miles per day and if my training hikes are any indication, I probably will only hike for six hours each day on average. That's going to leave a lot of downtime.

                • Ray Rippel
                  3.5 degrees F per 1000 feet is the general rule. On Jul 13, 2013, at 7:40 PM, Joe MacLeish wrote: Do we have a rule of thumb for
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                    3.5 degrees F per 1000 feet is the general rule.

                    On Jul 13, 2013, at 7:40 PM, Joe MacLeish <jmacleish@...> wrote:

                     

                    Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                    Joe

                     

                    From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ravi_jmt2013
                    Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 6:19 PM
                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Lightweight (old) paperbacks

                     

                     

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > ipod nano = 1.0 oz
                    > headphones = 0.3 oz
                    >

                    That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening might be easier to do in the evening in a dark tent compared to reading a book. But I suspect that most of my reading will be during the day. I don't have a very aggressive schedule in terms of miles per day and if my training hikes are any indication, I probably will only hike for six hours each day on average. That's going to leave a lot of downtime.

                  • Don Amundson
                    Or 4 or 5.4 or....pick a number between 3 and 5.5. It s dependent on the relative humidity amongst a lot of other factors. More info it your so inclined.
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                      Or 4 or 5.4 or....pick a number between 3 and 5.5.  It's dependent on the relative humidity amongst a lot of other factors.  More info it your so inclined. 

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lapse_rate


                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      From: ray.rippel@...
                      Date: Sat, 13 Jul 2013 19:52:53 -0700
                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Weather by altitude

                       

                      3.5 degrees F per 1000 feet is the general rule.

                      On Jul 13, 2013, at 7:40 PM, Joe MacLeish <jmacleish@...> wrote:

                       

                      Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                      Joe

                       

                      From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ravi_jmt2013
                      Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 6:19 PM
                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Lightweight (old) paperbacks

                       

                       

                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > ipod nano = 1.0 oz
                      > headphones = 0.3 oz
                      >

                      That is tempting... I tried audiobooks once on a long road trip and liked it but for some reason I never returned to that format. I can see how listening might be easier to do in the evening in a dark tent compared to reading a book. But I suspect that most of my reading will be during the day. I don't have a very aggressive schedule in terms of miles per day and if my training hikes are any indication, I probably will only hike for six hours each day on average. That's going to leave a lot of downtime.



                    • John Ladd
                      Traditional rule of thumb (all other things equal) is 3 degrees F per 1000 feet elevation John L
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                        Traditional rule of thumb (all other things equal) is 3 degrees F per 1000 feet elevation

                        John L

                        On Sat, Jul 13, 2013 at 7:39 PM, Joe MacLeish <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                         

                        Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                        Joe

                         

                         
                      • Joe MacLeish
                        OK, 85F (high) at Cedar Grove next week (Tues) at 5000 ft and guess 65 -70 at 10,000 ft (Grouse lake). I can live with that. thanks all, Joe From:
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 13, 2013
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                          OK, 85F (high) at Cedar Grove next week (Tues) at 5000 ft and guess 65 -70 at 10,000 ft (Grouse lake).  I can live with that.

                          thanks all,

                          Joe

                           

                          From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Ladd
                          Sent: Saturday, July 13, 2013 8:06 PM
                          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Weather by altitude

                           

                           

                          Traditional rule of thumb (all other things equal) is 3 degrees F per 1000 feet elevation


                          John L

                           

                          On Sat, Jul 13, 2013 at 7:39 PM, Joe MacLeish <jmacleish@...> wrote:

                           

                          Do we have a rule of thumb for temperature as a function of altitude.  Like the temp drops x degrees for each 1000 ft of altitude gain all other things being the same.  I know it's a rough estimate and there are a thousand other factors but ....

                          Joe

                           

                           

                        • fortunateblessings
                          On a related note. I m planning to carry a Samsung Galaxy S 4.0. It s a player not a phone, but it has wifi, accepts a micro SD card and a small form factor.
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 16, 2013
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                            On a related note. I'm planning to carry a Samsung Galaxy S 4.0. It's a player not a phone, but it has wifi, accepts a micro SD card and a small form factor. At 4.1 oz. plus 0.8 per battery (model: EB494353VU) it will provide text capability with Bluetooth sync to my InReach for enhanced function and communications, if needed; uses the Kindle app and carries a large library including Wenk, NOLS Wilderness First Aid manual, PDF docs (e.g., JMT crib sheet, manuals, etc.); stores a music catalog for a psych lift, if needed at some point (add 0.4 oz for headphones); and it has a back-up camera. It's fairly easy on batteries if used thoughtfully/sparingly. Weight penalty for the unit plus headphones and two batteries = 6.1 oz.

                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.
                            >
                            > However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).
                            >
                            > My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.
                            >
                            > Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.
                            >
                            > Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
                            >
                          • fortunateblessings
                            I neglected to properly sign off. Please forgive my manners. All the best, Mark
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 16, 2013
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                              I neglected to properly sign off. Please forgive my manners.

                              All the best,
                              Mark

                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "fortunateblessings" <fortunateblessings@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > On a related note. I'm planning to carry a Samsung Galaxy S 4.0. It's a player not a phone, but it has wifi, accepts a micro SD card and a small form factor. At 4.1 oz. plus 0.8 per battery (model: EB494353VU) it will provide text capability with Bluetooth sync to my InReach for enhanced function and communications, if needed; uses the Kindle app and carries a large library including Wenk, NOLS Wilderness First Aid manual, PDF docs (e.g., JMT crib sheet, manuals, etc.); stores a music catalog for a psych lift, if needed at some point (add 0.4 oz for headphones); and it has a back-up camera. It's fairly easy on batteries if used thoughtfully/sparingly. Weight penalty for the unit plus headphones and two batteries = 6.1 oz.
                              >
                              > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > There have been a few discussions here over the past several months regarding what type of reading material to take on the JMT and whether an e-reader or other electronic device makes sense to carry. For a while now I have had my Kindle Keyboard on the packing list which weighs 8 ounces. It seems like paperbacks are getting larger recently in terms of format and size. Many weigh 8 ounces or more.
                              > >
                              > > However, looking at my bookshelf today I happened to notice that older paperbacks can sometimes be much smaller. Few examples from my bookshelf: Call of the Wild (2.55 ounces), Catcher in the Rye (4 ounces), Treasure Island (3.8 ounces), All Quiet on the Western Front (3.9 ounces).
                              > >
                              > > My new plan is to find smaller format paperbacks and take one with me to Yosemite Valley and ship another one to MTR. Either donate the one I carry from Yosemite Valley to the MTR hiker barrels or ship it home. But I need to find some things to read and betting that used bookstores should have many old paperbacks.
                              > >
                              > > Only downside is that I would have carried the Wenk guidebook on my Kindle and now I won't have it. But I will carry the compressed data points from the file section which is really what I need.
                              > >
                              > > Anyway, I've cut 4 ounces from my packing list and have one less fragile item to worry about that could require recharging.
                              > >
                              >
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