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class 1-5 and above

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  • Robert W. Freed
    Class I – walking, sometimes steep, but never with doubtful footing or any danger of a fall. Class II – difficult walking, often steep with doubtful or
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 7, 2009
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      Class I � walking, sometimes steep, but never with doubtful footing or any danger of a fall.

      Class II � difficult walking, often steep with doubtful or slippery footing. �A slip or tumble is possible. �You never need to use your hands to make upward progress. �

      Class III � climbing, often on steep rock or snow. �Handholds and footholds must be utilized to make upward progress. �Injury inducing falls of up to five or six feet are possible. �You must use your hands to make upward progress. �

      Class IV � climbing on sustained steep rock or snow. �Knowledge of roped climbing is required. �Climbers should move one at a time and be belayed, that is protected by an anchored rope. �Long, fatal falls are possible, especially for the leader.

      Class V � technical rock climbing. �Each climber moves in turn. �Use of specialized protection equipment, helmets and shoes is required. �Detailed knowledge of climbing, anchoring, protection and descent techniques is required. �The rope is anchored at all times and is secured to the mountain at intermediate points by the leader. �Upward progress is made using natural hand and foot holds, however. �The rope is used only to protect against falls. Long, serious falls are possible.

      Class VI � technical rock climbing. �Same as for class V, except that natural holds are not available. �Climbers make upward progress by attaching the rope to the cliff and climbing it, or being hauled up by it. �Artificial ladders or etriers will likely come into use. �Highly technical equipment for attaching the rope and ladders to the cliff must be used. �El Cap in Yosemite Valley is the most famous venue for Class VI climbing.

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    • Ken
      I do not want to be the leader in Class IV. Thank you for your support. ________________________________ From: Robert W. Freed To:
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 7, 2009
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        I do not want to be the leader in Class IV. Thank you for your support.




        ________________________________
        From: Robert W. Freed <robert@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, January 7, 2009 9:29:28 PM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] class 1-5 and above

        Class I � walking, sometimes steep, but never with doubtful footing or any danger of a fall.

        Class II � difficult walking, often steep with doubtful or slippery footing. A slip or tumble is possible. You never need to use your hands to make upward progress.

        Class III � climbing, often on steep rock or snow. Handholds and footholds must be utilized to make upward progress. Injury inducing falls of up to five or six feet are possible. You must use your hands to make upward progress.

        Class IV � climbing on sustained steep rock or snow. Knowledge of roped climbing is required. Climbers should move one at a time and be belayed, that is protected by an anchored rope. Long, fatal falls are possible, especially for the leader.

        Class V � technical rock climbing. Each climber moves in turn. Use of specialized protection equipment, helmets and shoes is required. Detailed knowledge of climbing, anchoring, protection and descent techniques is required. The rope is anchored at all times and is secured to the mountain at intermediate points by the leader. Upward progress is made using natural hand and foot holds, however. The rope is used only to protect against falls. Long, serious falls are possible.

        Class VI � technical rock climbing. Same as for class V, except that natural holds are not available. Climbers make upward progress by attaching the rope to the cliff and climbing it, or being hauled up by it. Artificial ladders or etriers will likely come into use. Highly technical equipment for attaching the rope and ladders to the cliff must be used. El Cap in Yosemite Valley is the most famous venue for Class VI climbing.

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      • Patronio@aol.com
        Thank you guys for the Climbling Class classification!! Now I understand what you are talking about when you use that climbing lingo. Thanx! J. **************
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 9, 2009
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          Thank you guys for the Climbling Class classification!! Now I understand what
          you are talking about when you use that climbing lingo. Thanx!
          J.


          **************
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