Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Review Postholer printed maps

Expand Messages
  • John Ladd
    I ordered the Postholer Printed PCT maps which included the area of the PCT-JMT overlap. The maps are quite good, but i decided to return them because I think
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 8, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I ordered the  Postholer Printed PCT maps which included the area of the PCT-JMT overlap.

      The maps are quite good, but i decided to return them because I think the Tom Harrison map set (which I already owned) is better

      The TH maps have UTM tickings on the 4 edges of the maps and a corresponding grid which cross-hatches the map. This makes it easy to take a GPS reading in the field and find on the map where you are, or to compute a UTM reading from the map. The Postholer maps lack the cross-hatching grid and the tics on the borders of the map are in decimal lat/long degrees rather than the UTM numbers. I find decimal degrees harder to use than the UTM format

      Many of the labels on the Postholer maps overlap each other, such that a label that Postholer added may overlap a label that appears on the basemaps

      The contour shading is better on the TH maps, while the vegetation shading is better on Postholer

      The scale on the Postholer maps is larger than the TH set, which is a point in its favor, though of course it means that it takes more sheets to cover the trail with Postholer than TH. But I find the TH scale usable

      Both maps use 80 foot contour intervals, which is larger than I'd prefer but probably necessary given the scales used. The 80 foot contour levels make it harder to use an altimeter for navigation

      TH shows elevations at passes and often at crossings and trail junctions, which facilitate resetting a barometric altimeter directly from the map. Postholer has the same information, but in his databook, rather than on the map itself.

      TH printing is a bit crisper, though the Postholer printing is quite good.

      The paper used for the TH maps is probably better than Postholer, though it is printed single-sided while Postholer is printed double-sided.

      Neither set is particularly good at inclusion of sidetrails and bailout routes, as they often go over the edges of the map within a few miles of the JMT. However, TH is a bit better in this regard.

      Postholer has mile markers on his maps, and TH does not. However, they are Northbound PCT milepoints which can be a bit confusing if you are accustomed to SoBo JMT milepoints.

      I'd take the Postholer in a minute if there wasn't a TH map available of the place I wanted to hike. The Postholer maps are quite, quite good. They are much better maps than the Erik the Black Atlas (tho that set has a very useful format) and handier than the USGS 7.5 minute maps. 

      It's just that the TH maps are better for my purposes where there is a TH map covering the ground I want to cover

      With either the TH maps or the Postholer maps, it is very helpful to print out the datapoints (NoBo or SoBo milepoint and elevation of all campsites, trail junctions, crossings and passes) that are available , courtesy of Wilderness Press, in our files area.

      If you have access to a good printer, the free downloadable Postholer JMT set will give you a servicable map set without cost. It is linked at the following page

      http://postholer.com/databook/index.php?trail_id=4

      If link does not work, paste this into your browser

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/johnmuirtrail/files/Planning%20and%20Transportation/_Wilderness%20Press%20and%20Other%20Data%20Points/

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • Don
      Also worth considering are Halfmile maps. I had the opportunity to use them recently and found them more than adequate for my purposes. What really was
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 8, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Also worth considering are Halfmile maps. I had the opportunity to use them recently and found them more than adequate for my purposes. What really was impressed with though was the free app that works with them. I'm not into looking at a map much if I'm on an established trail but I do like to know sometimes how far I am from specific locations-water sources, trail junctions, camp sites etc. Also if there is any confusion about being on the right trail (it does happen). The app tells you where your at and where your not as the case may be. It lists up coming landmarks and also list the landmarks you've passes. Lot's of other info too--UTM coordinates etc. And it shows the info as a list instead of a little arrow on a faint line.
        Best of all the maps and app is free.

        http://www.pctmap.net/
        https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/halfmiles-pct/id521937514?mt=8

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
        >
        > I ordered the Postholer Printed PCT maps which included the area of the
        > PCT-JMT overlap.
        >
        > The maps are quite good, but i decided to return them because I think the
        > Tom Harrison map set (which I already owned) is better
        >
        > The TH maps have UTM tickings on the 4 edges of the maps and a
        > corresponding grid which cross-hatches the map. This makes it easy to take
        > a GPS reading in the field and find on the map where you are, or to compute
        > a UTM reading from the map. The Postholer maps lack the cross-hatching grid
        > and the tics on the borders of the map are in decimal lat/long degrees
        > rather than the UTM numbers. I find decimal degrees harder to use than the
        > UTM format
        >
        > Many of the labels on the Postholer maps overlap each other, such that a
        > label that Postholer added may overlap a label that appears on the basemaps
        >
        > The contour shading is better on the TH maps, while the vegetation shading
        > is better on Postholer
        >
        > The scale on the Postholer maps is larger than the TH set, which is a point
        > in its favor, though of course it means that it takes more sheets to cover
        > the trail with Postholer than TH. But I find the TH scale usable
        >
        > Both maps use 80 foot contour intervals, which is larger than I'd prefer
        > but probably necessary given the scales used. The 80 foot contour levels
        > make it harder to use an altimeter for navigation
        >
        > TH shows elevations at passes and often at crossings and trail junctions,
        > which facilitate resetting a barometric altimeter directly from the map.
        > Postholer has the same information, but in his databook, rather than on the
        > map itself.
        >
        > TH printing is a bit crisper, though the Postholer printing is quite good.
        >
        > The paper used for the TH maps is probably better than Postholer, though it
        > is printed single-sided while Postholer is printed double-sided.
        >
        > Neither set is particularly good at inclusion of sidetrails and bailout
        > routes, as they often go over the edges of the map within a few miles of
        > the JMT. However, TH is a bit better in this regard.
        >
        > Postholer has mile markers on his maps, and TH does not. However, they are
        > Northbound PCT milepoints which can be a bit confusing if you are
        > accustomed to SoBo JMT milepoints.
        >
        > I'd take the Postholer in a minute if there wasn't a TH map available of
        > the place I wanted to hike. The Postholer maps are quite, quite good. They
        > are much better maps than the Erik the Black Atlas (tho that set has a very
        > useful format) and handier than the USGS 7.5 minute maps.
        >
        > It's just that the TH maps are better for my purposes where there is a TH
        > map covering the ground I want to cover
        >
        > With either the TH maps or the Postholer maps, it is very helpful to print
        > out the datapoints (NoBo or SoBo milepoint and elevation of all campsites,
        > trail junctions, crossings and passes) that are available , courtesy of
        > Wilderness Press, in our files
        > area<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/johnmuirtrail/files/Planning%20and%20Transportation/_Wilderness%20Press%20and%20Other%20Data%20Points/>
        > .
        >
        > If you have access to a good printer, the free downloadable Postholer
        > JMTset will give you a
        > servicable map set without cost. It is linked at the following page
        >
        > http://postholer.com/databook/index.php?trail_id=4
        >
        > If link does not work, paste this into your browser
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/johnmuirtrail
        > /files/Planning%20and%20Transportation/_Wilderness%20Press%20and%20Other%20Data%20Points/
        >
        > John Curran Ladd
        > 1616 Castro Street
        > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
        > 415-648-9279
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.