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Re: What degree sleeping bag?

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  • Robert
    Thirty-five degree with 100 percent silk liner (keeps the bag fresh by eliminating that oily feeling and it s easy to wash and dry). Used to sleep in the open,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 29 11:08 PM
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      Thirty-five degree with 100 percent silk liner (keeps the bag fresh by eliminating that oily feeling and it's easy to wash and dry). Used to sleep in the open, but now use a tent, which adds a few degrees of warmth. For me, it simply doesn't get that cold in the Sierra in July and August unless it sets into raining during a monsoon. I usually wear a T-shirt and undershorts, but there were a couple of nights on the JMT above timber line when I added a long-sleeve, quarter-zip merino wool shirt. Temps got near freezing. If things were to get colder I would have added a Patagonia down sweater vest and long underwear bottoms to the mix.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...> wrote:
      >
      > To all you July/August JMT Hikers:
      >
      > What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?
      >
      > Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!
      >
    • staehpj1
      I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 30 6:10 AM
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        I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The bag is a Mountain Hardware Phantom 45. I have found that FOR ME it has been fine on many sub freezing nights. I have used it down to 18 F in a bivy with bike tights, a warm shirt, and two pairs of socks, but did not feel like that was even the lower limit for the set up.

        I should mention that I apparently put out heat like a furnace, since I often camp with folks with a MUCH warmer setup who were wearing all their layers and say they were freezing when I was comfy with no layers without even zipping the bag.
      • Roleigh Martin
        If you re good down to 18F, you ll be fine for a summer JMT hiker. Coldest I ve seen it get is down to about 25F. ... Visit my Google Profile (lots of very
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 30 7:32 AM
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          If you're good down to 18F, you'll be fine for a summer JMT hiker.  Coldest I've seen it get is down to about 25F.

          -------------------------------------------------
          Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
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          On Sun, Jun 30, 2013 at 9:10 AM, staehpj1 <Pete.Staehling@...> wrote:
           

          I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The bag is a Mountain Hardware Phantom 45. I have found that FOR ME it has been fine on many sub freezing nights. I have used it down to 18 F in a bivy with bike tights, a warm shirt, and two pairs of socks, but did not feel like that was even the lower limit for the set up.

          I should mention that I apparently put out heat like a furnace, since I often camp with folks with a MUCH warmer setup who were wearing all their layers and say they were freezing when I was comfy with no layers without even zipping the bag.


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