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Re: [John Muir Trail] light weight sun shirt

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  • John
    Joe I have one of these in a men s http://www.sierratradingpost.com/golite-wisp-wind-shirt-long-sleeve-for- women~p~44489/
    Message 1 of 53 , Jun 29, 2013
      Joe I have one of these in a men's  http://www.sierratradingpost.com/golite-wisp-wind-shirt-long-sleeve-for-women~p~44489/ . Weighs 3.2 oz. I find it to not breath as well as advertised, so I mainly use it for wind.

      For backpacking, I like a loose fitting shirt that allows for ventilation. My current hiking sun shirt isn't much lighter than yours at 8.2 oz.  but at $25  the price was right. http://www.sierratradingpost.com/white-sierra-kalgoorlie-shirt-upf-30-long-sleeve-for-men~p~3184p/?filterString=s~white-sierra-men%2F&colorFamily=01 

      John

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" wrote:
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      > Unfortunately is uses 4.9 oz/y? but actually weighs 9.6 oz. I think TNF or Railriders are the least weighty so far.
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      > Joe
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      > From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of robert shattuck
      > Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 11:03 PM
      > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      > Cc: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] light weight sun shirt
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      > You can also try the Patagonia lightweight sun hoody ....I actually never bothered to figure out how much it weighs, but apparently only 4.9 ounces.
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      > It's sold in their surfing line of clothes and isn't really considered anything but sun protection.
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      > I used it last year and was quite happy with it.
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      > The tropic comfort has a zip pocket, while the lightweight just has the pouch pocket and no thumb loops in the sleeves.
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      > Bob
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      > Sent from my iPhone
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      > On Jun 28, 2013, at 9:43 PM, "Brian Kimball" kimballistic@... wrote:
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      > If you don't like a slim fit, or if you want a lighter khaki color, or if you want a sun hood too, try Patagonia's Tropic Comfort Hoody. $9 more ($59) and said to weigh 8.6 oz. I bought it a few weeks ago and am amazed by how light and airy it feels. Can't wait to test it in the heat.
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      > http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/tropic-comfort-hoody?p=52120-0-323
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      > On Jun 28, 2013, at 7:37 PM, straw_marmot no_reply@yahoogroups.com wrote:
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      > This is my bottom layer every time I hike.
      > Medium weighs 5.1 oz.
      > Ignore the skier on the website - this is soft thin lightweight wicking polyester, ideal material for hot weather. It dries in minutes. In hot weather, I peel down until this is my only layer.
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      > http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog/sc-gear/mens-shirts-sweaters/men-39-s-light-zip-neck.html?from=subCat
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      > I've done a lot of desert hiking in intense sun, and never found anything better. As it gets very hot, obviously you want light wicking material, but I still like to have long sleeves and a high neck for sun protection, and a zipper for regulation. This fits the bill perfectly for me. I can't find an SPF rating on the website, but I can tell you this has been my only layer for weeks in intense sun and I've never been burnt (I'm fair-skinned and burn easily).
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      > I don't know your body type, but this is a "slim" fit by American standards. I'm tall and slim, and for me most US tops have a huge flop of excess width in material under the armpits. This is the only baselayer I've found that fits nicely when I raise my arms. Medium fits me perfecly (I'm 6'2", 175lb, long arms).
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    • jjmcwill2003
      Using stakes or anything else in a T configuration is known as a dead-man. It s often used for winter time or mountaineering tent pitches, when stakes,
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 12
        Using stakes or anything else in a "T" configuration is known as a dead-man. 

        It's often used for winter time or mountaineering tent pitches, when stakes, trekking poles, skis, or ice axes are used as "dead man" anchors for shelters.


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