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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: What degree sleeping bag?

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  • Bill Heiser
    The answer to the OP s question is really subjective. I used a Marmot Helium (15F) bag on the trail for the full month of August last year. It was fine early
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 28, 2013
      The answer to the OP's question is really subjective.

      I used a Marmot Helium (15F) bag on the trail for the full month of August last year.  It was fine early on, but in the later sections I was cold each night.  I attributed this to my being low on energy due to not having as much food as I might have liked.  Additionally I suspect the bag is over-rated temperature-wise.  Normally (at home) I am a very warm sleeper & eschew heavy covers unless it's quite cold.

      But regardless of the bag, the temperature was significantly colder later in the trip (later in Aug plus higher elevations) than earlier on.

      YMMV ...    My suggestion would be to go for a colder-rated bag than you think you need because you can always unzip it, but unless you're packing heavy & have extra clothes, you can't do much to warm up at night if you're cold ...




      pburke@... wrote:
       


      August would be a 30F bag, rarely zipped up, no extra layers or liners.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...> wrote:
      >
      > To all you July/August JMT Hikers:
      >
      > What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?
      >

    • Dale Stuart
      I have but one bag, Marmot Helium, 15*. Worked well in 2011 (snow year) when it dropped well below freezing some nights. But way overkill for 2012 and the
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 28, 2013
        I have but one bag, Marmot Helium, 15*. Worked well in 2011 (snow year) when it dropped well below freezing some nights. But way overkill for 2012 and the heat. I just drape it over me like a quilt.  I wear silk weight long johns to keep the funk off my bag.
        I'm thinking a 32* would be plenty this year.
         
        -Dale 


        From: Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 1:51 PM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] What degree sleeping bag?

         
        To all you July/August JMT Hikers:

        What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?

        Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!



      • Carolsteveyoung
        Regardless of bag it s always possible to make yourself a hot water bottle if the night is especially cold. Stuff it in a sock if possible and bring to bed. Or
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 28, 2013
          Regardless of bag it's always possible to make yourself a hot water bottle if the night is especially cold. Stuff it in a sock if possible and bring to bed. 

          Or maybe I should get along better with my spouse. 

          Steve Young
          Geneva IL

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jun 28, 2013, at 2:15 PM, John <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:

           

          For me, +32 down bag, no liners and no other down clothing or accessories .

          John M. 

          On Jun 28, 2013, at 10:51 AM, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...> wrote:

           

          To all you July/August JMT Hikers:

          What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?

          Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!

        • ravi_jmt2013
          I also have the Marmot Helium 15 degree bag. I only got to test it one night this past winter when it was below freezing (I estimate around 25 degrees). With
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 29, 2013
            I also have the Marmot Helium 15 degree bag. I only got to test it one night this past winter when it was below freezing (I estimate around 25 degrees). With my down parka on, I was warm enough but my feet were frozen. I fixed that situation by wrapping my down parka around my feet but then I was not quite as warm. Not terribly uncomfortable but probably would have been if it got any colder. Since then I have purchased Goosefeet gear down socks so the next time I will be able to keep my feet warm and also wear the down parka. I feel like this should make the bag good down to the low 20s at least. Unless there is a really unusual cold snap, I do not expect temperatures below that level by the time I finish the trail in mid September.

            I recently was tempted to sell my Helium and purchase a zPacks 20 degree bag/quilt to replace it. The zPacks bag is amazingly light at 18 ounces for the configuration I would order - half the weight of my Helium. But since I would not be able to test it in freezing conditions prior to the hike (short of sneaking into a restaurant's freezer room), I'm going to defer that potential gear change until 2014. I don't like the idea of relying on a bag for warmth on a long trip without testing it under similar conditions first.



            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Bill Heiser <bill@...> wrote:
            >
            > The answer to the OP's question is really subjective.
            >
            > I used a Marmot Helium (15F) bag on the trail for the full month of
            > August last year. It was fine early on, but in the later sections I was
            > cold each night. I attributed this to my being low on energy due to not
            > having as much food as I might have liked. Additionally I suspect the
            > bag is over-rated temperature-wise. Normally (at home) I am a very warm
            > sleeper & eschew heavy covers unless it's quite cold.
            >
            > But regardless of the bag, the temperature was significantly colder
            > later in the trip (later in Aug plus higher elevations) than earlier on.
            >
            > YMMV ... My suggestion would be to go for a colder-rated bag than you
            > think you need because you can always unzip it, but unless you're
            > packing heavy & have extra clothes, you can't do much to warm up at
            > night if you're cold ...
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > pburke@... wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > August would be a 30F bag, rarely zipped up, no extra layers or liners.
            > >
            > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            > > <mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com>, Cynthia Harrell
            > > <cbharrell@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > To all you July/August JMT Hikers:
            > > >
            > > > What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants?
            > > Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Joseph Lindhardt
            I second Jim s comment.   I hope to be on the JMT the last 3 weeks in July.  I am taking a Big Agnes McAlpin 5 degree dri-down mummy bag with a Sea To Summet
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 29, 2013
              I second Jim's comment.
               
              I hope to be on the JMT the last 3 weeks in July.  I am taking a Big Agnes McAlpin 5 degree dri-down mummy bag with a Sea To Summet silk bag liner, stored in a Sea To Summit 15L compression bag.  I use a Therm-a-rest Xtherm sleeping pad.  It may be overkill, but I don't deal with the cold very well and I've found a comfortable night's rest is critical in recuperating.  If it's too warm, I just drape it over me like a blanket.
               
              I do not have down pants.  Polypro is my base layer.  I am taking a down jacket, though, as a mid layer.  I have down booties that I may take as camp shoes if I have the room.
               
              Joe
              From: Ray Rippel <ray.rippel@...>
              To: "johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 4:39 PM
              Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: What degree sleeping bag?
               
              Strongly agree!
              On Jun 28, 2013, at 11:39 AM, straw_marmot <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               
              If there's any uncertainty in your mind, in my opinion this is not an area to skimp to save either weight or $. I think it's such an important part of staying healthy to be comfortable at night, both physiologically and psychologically.

              --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, Jim W <jimqpublic@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have always brought the bag I have... Sometimes that was 0 degrees for
              > year round use.
              >
              > But I generally suggest a bag that is comfortable FOR YOU just below
              > freezing. For most people a bag advertised as 15-20 degrees is good; for
              > others a 40 degree bag would work. The new EN rating system is more honest
              > than most manufacturer ratings. I would go with an EN "Comfort" rating of
              > 25-35.
              >
              > If you want to push it a bit, only cover July/Aug, and sleep low or with
              > warm clothes then go with a lighter bag. My suggested bag will be good
              > with only a light base layer in summer, OK in May-October with some warmer
              > layers, and even work November and April with puffy jacket and pants.
              >
              > (This is specific to the JMT portion of the Sierra)
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 11:27 AM, <pburke@...> wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > August would be a 30F bag, rarely zipped up, no extra layers or liners.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@>
              > > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > To all you July/August JMT Hikers:
              > > >
              > > > What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any
              > > down booties? Bag + liner combos?
              > > >
              > > > Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >

            • Ned Tibbits
              Ah, but Grasshopper, you’d better have a stove along, first, to provide that hot water bottle! Ned Tibbits, Director Mountain Education
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 29, 2013
                Ah, but Grasshopper, you’d better have a stove along, first, to provide that hot water bottle!
                 
                 
                Ned Tibbits, Director
                Mountain Education
                www.mountaineducation.org
                 
                Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 7:30 PM
                Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] What degree sleeping bag?
                 
                 

                Regardless of bag it's always possible to make yourself a hot water bottle if the night is especially cold. Stuff it in a sock if possible and bring to bed.
                 
                Or maybe I should get along better with my spouse.
                 
                Steve Young
                Geneva IL

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Jun 28, 2013, at 2:15 PM, John <jmaddog1082@...> wrote:

                 
                For me, +32 down bag, no liners and no other down clothing or accessories .
                 
                John M.

                On Jun 28, 2013, at 10:51 AM, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...> wrote:

                 

                To all you July/August JMT Hikers:

                What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?

                Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!

              • Robert
                Thirty-five degree with 100 percent silk liner (keeps the bag fresh by eliminating that oily feeling and it s easy to wash and dry). Used to sleep in the open,
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 29, 2013
                  Thirty-five degree with 100 percent silk liner (keeps the bag fresh by eliminating that oily feeling and it's easy to wash and dry). Used to sleep in the open, but now use a tent, which adds a few degrees of warmth. For me, it simply doesn't get that cold in the Sierra in July and August unless it sets into raining during a monsoon. I usually wear a T-shirt and undershorts, but there were a couple of nights on the JMT above timber line when I added a long-sleeve, quarter-zip merino wool shirt. Temps got near freezing. If things were to get colder I would have added a Patagonia down sweater vest and long underwear bottoms to the mix.

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Cynthia Harrell <cbharrell@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > To all you July/August JMT Hikers:
                  >
                  > What degree sleeping bag do you plan to take along? Any down pants? Any down booties? Bag + liner combos?
                  >
                  > Thanks, in advance, for your thoughts!
                  >
                • staehpj1
                  I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 30, 2013
                    I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The bag is a Mountain Hardware Phantom 45. I have found that FOR ME it has been fine on many sub freezing nights. I have used it down to 18 F in a bivy with bike tights, a warm shirt, and two pairs of socks, but did not feel like that was even the lower limit for the set up.

                    I should mention that I apparently put out heat like a furnace, since I often camp with folks with a MUCH warmer setup who were wearing all their layers and say they were freezing when I was comfy with no layers without even zipping the bag.
                  • Roleigh Martin
                    If you re good down to 18F, you ll be fine for a summer JMT hiker. Coldest I ve seen it get is down to about 25F. ... Visit my Google Profile (lots of very
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 30, 2013
                      If you're good down to 18F, you'll be fine for a summer JMT hiker.  Coldest I've seen it get is down to about 25F.

                      -------------------------------------------------
                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                      _



                      On Sun, Jun 30, 2013 at 9:10 AM, staehpj1 <Pete.Staehling@...> wrote:
                       

                      I hesitate to answer that because I might either cause someone to freeze or get a lecture, but... I plan to take a 45 F bag with no extra down clothing. The bag is a Mountain Hardware Phantom 45. I have found that FOR ME it has been fine on many sub freezing nights. I have used it down to 18 F in a bivy with bike tights, a warm shirt, and two pairs of socks, but did not feel like that was even the lower limit for the set up.

                      I should mention that I apparently put out heat like a furnace, since I often camp with folks with a MUCH warmer setup who were wearing all their layers and say they were freezing when I was comfy with no layers without even zipping the bag.


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