Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [John Muir Trail] light camp shoes

Expand Messages
  • straw_marmot
    Hmm, I just received a pair of the Vivos that I had ordered. I m skeptical, sending them back. In their favor: Light Won t fall off your foot All plastic,
    Message 1 of 31 , Jun 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hmm, I just received a pair of the Vivos that I had ordered. I'm skeptical, sending them back.

      In their favor:
      Light
      Won't fall off your foot
      All plastic, will dry immediately

      But...
      Extremely flimsy. The sole is thin foam-plastic. Any kind of thorn or sharp rock is going straight through it. Really doesn't feel like it would have any grip on wet rock.

      I can't see the point of carrying 8oz for something that would not in any case be adequate in a challenging crossing in heavy water, and would not work as a backup shoe if your hiking shoes fell apart. The Vivos will protect bare soles from the gravel in an easy shallow crossing, that's about it. But I'd barely even trust these to protect my soles sufficiently using them around camp.

      Here's where I am, I think:

      I have Merrell Trail Glove 2, pair weigh 14oz (size 10). These go with me if I feel I need a real water shoe, for hiking extended distances IN water along a stream bed, or frequent difficult crossings. Virtually all of the weight is concentrated in a robust grippy rubber sole and a bit of toe protection, they just don't have any heel or arch support. If my main hiking shoes broke, I think I could comfortably hike 50 miles in these over any terrain.

      Below this weight, I've really not found anything that I think is worth taking. If I take nothing (that's my plan for Yosemite & JMT in Aug/Sep), it's barefoot for really easy crossings, or if there's anything trickier the Cascadias just get wet.



      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Peterson <pdawg893@...> wrote:
      >
      > Second on the vivo's only 4 ounces
      >
      > http://www.zappos.com/product/7898610/color/4854?zfcTest=fcl%3A0
      >
      > Sent from my iPad
      >
      > On Jun 25, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Vivobarefeet, their lightest version without liners.
      > >
      > > Barbara
      > >
      > >
      > > On Jun 26, 2013, at 5:10 AM, "chashendu" <chashendu@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >> What are your suggestions for the lightest possible camp shoes that would also work for stream crossing?
      > >> ~Charlie
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
    • coureur_de_boue
      I used these on a day run from the Valley to Half Dome/return in March. They re a fairly robust shoe for the weight...though there is very little cushion.
      Message 31 of 31 , Jul 17, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I used these on a day run from the Valley to Half Dome/return in March. They're a fairly robust shoe for the weight...though there is very little cushion.
        Beware the low drop in the heal...if you wear them for extended periods without training, your calves will feel it!

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "straw_marmot" <ralphbge@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mine just arrived, a keeper - this is my new best option for JMT.
        > Thanks again Roleigh for drawing my attention to these.
        >
        > Size 11D weigh 5.0 oz each.
        > (I take 11 in Cascadia w/medium sock; 11D Minimus is good barefoot)
        >
        > The upper is thin, semi-transparent, but not a mesh - small stones / gravel won't enter.
        > They've kept the weight down by making the sole out of one layer of spongy expanded plastic, with a robust grippy Vibram rubber layer bonded to the heel and forefoot.
        >
        > These shoes are by some margin the lightest that I've found that satisfy my requirements for a shoe to be worth taking at all:
        >
        > (1) Water crossing: secure full lacing, won't get sucked off in heavy water or mud; grippy rubber sole, substantial enough to protect against sharp stones. Dry fast.
        >
        > (2) I'm confident that I could hike 50 miles in these in an emergency.
        > Soles are sufficiently protective. But no support at all - they feel like you're barefoot with a layer of rubber stuck to your sole. Toe protection is minimal, but small stones won't enter. These are not at all durable - definitely emergency-only.
        >
        > They will also be fine as a camp shoe - the spongy inner sole layer makes them pretty comfortable. Obviously not slip-on.
        >
        > all the best
        > Ralph
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > > Men's
        > > http://www.newbalance.com/Minimus-Zero-Trail/886350667359,default,pd.html
        > > Women's
        > > http://www.newbalance.com/Minimus-Zero-Trail/WT00,default,pd.html?dwvar_WT00_color=Aquarius_with_Black&start=2&q=minimus%20zero%20trail&cgid=footwear
        > >
        > > I just ordered - they're on sale. Protip - if you order 1 pair, you pay nonrefundable shipping. If you order 2 pairs, shipping is free. Return shipping is always free. Go figure... so just try 2 sizes with no risk. Available in wide fitting too.
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.