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Re: [John Muir Trail] Dry Bag Combinations

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  • ravi_jmt2013
    In addition to the zpacks pack liner, my sleeping bag, sleep clothes, and down socks are in another dry bag positioned at the very bottom of my pack. The
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 26, 2013
      In addition to the zpacks pack liner, my sleeping bag, sleep clothes, and down socks are in another dry bag positioned at the very bottom of my pack. The Bearikade goes on top of that dry bag vertically and then my other clothes and rain gear gets stuffed into the pack on each side of the canister to keep it centered. I do have additional dry bags that I intended to use for the extra clothes but I found that packing in a dry bag limited my ability to center the canister and took up more space. If I pack well, the canister and clothing forms a base near the top of the internal frame on my pack. I then place my tent, Jetboil, and a small bag of miscellaneous items not needed during the day on top. I then close the pack liner dry bag.

      I have a tall and skinny dry bag that goes in one of the side pockets of the pack and contains items that I may need during the day. My camera is in one of the hip belt pockets in a ziplock. In a bad rain storm I would put the camera into the side pocket dry bag. Then cover the entire pack with the cuben pack cover.





      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "john_friend" <yahoo@...> wrote:
      >
      > This is my plan also. One dry bag for the down sleeping bag. One dry
      > bag for all clothes I'm not wearing. I went through the rest of my pack
      > list and everything else in the pack list could either get wet just fine
      > or will be in a ziplock already.
      > I figure a nice feature of having all my clothes in a single dry bag is
      > I can bring that dry bag under the tarp and have easier access to all my
      > clothes. I think I may also have a couple large ziplocks for dirty
      > clothes (e.g. socks/underwear that need to be washed) so they don't
      > taint the clean clothes.
      > I'm using Seat-To-Summit Ultra-Sil Drysacks
      > <http://www.rei.com/product/777725/sea-to-summit-ultra-sil-dry-sack>
      > (bought on sale at REI). A 13 liter for my sleeping bag and a 20 liter
      > for the clothes. Neither dry bag will be completely full (which makes
      > them easier to use).
      > --John
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin wrote:
      > >
      > > I recommend a minimum of two guaranteed waterproof dry sacks. One for
      > the
      > > sleeping bag which I like to lay flat, like a squished pancake at the
      > > bottom of my pack and the bear canister vertically situated on top of
      > the
      > > center of that dry sack, that way, the metal edge of the canister is
      > > cushioned, instead of rubbing up against inside-pack-fabric, for if
      > you
      > > have metal against fabric against rock or ground, guess what loses --
      > yes,
      > > the pack fabric.
      > >
      > > The other dry sack is for your dry clothes and down jacket and
      > anything
      > > else you want to keep clean. You might even want a third dry sack to
      > > differentiate between clothing and equipment (such as a camera, etc)
      > that
      > > you don't want to get wet.
      > >
      > > One thing for dry sacks is to guarantee things stay dry if you fall
      > over
      > > crossing a stream and your pack gets wet that way. It can be a sunny
      > day
      > > and you still don't want stuff to get wet that you want to keep dry.
      > >
      > > Has such every happened -- yes I've seen it happen once. Not to me,
      > but to
      > > my hiking partner.
      > > -------------------------------------------------
      > > Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research
      > > links)
      > > _
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Tue, Jun 25, 2013 at 5:01 PM, Darryl dabrahms@ wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > In reading messages about Rain and Drying Strategies, it is apparent
      > that
      > > > using one or more dry bags is a good practice. I would appreciate
      > > > suggestions on best configurations of dry bags. For example, should
      > I
      > > > purchase one large dry bag which will act as an inner liner for my
      > whole
      > > > backpack or a smaller dry bag for my down sleeping bag and down vest
      > > > together, or a combination of multi-size dry bags for different
      > categories?
      > > > Which sizes and quantities will provide the most efficient
      > protection from
      > > > the weather (or other benefits)?
      > > > Thanks again,
      > > > Darryl
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Gail
      Ravi, I do what you do (sleeping bag and sleep clothes in a dry bag on the bottom of my pack, my bear can centered vertically on top of that), but then I stuff
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 26, 2013
        Ravi, I do what you do (sleeping bag and sleep clothes in a dry bag on the bottom of my pack, my bear can centered vertically on top of that), but then I stuff my tent, loose, all around the bear can to keep it centered. And I push that way down to fill up all the empty spaces. If you did that, would you have room to put the rest of your clothes in a dry bag on top of the bear can?

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
        >
        > In addition to the zpacks pack liner, my sleeping bag, sleep clothes, and down socks are in another dry bag positioned at the very bottom of my pack. The Bearikade goes on top of that dry bag vertically and then my other clothes and rain gear gets stuffed into the pack on each side of the canister to keep it centered. I do have additional dry bags that I intended to use for the extra clothes but I found that packing in a dry bag limited my ability to center the canister and took up more space. If I pack well, the canister and clothing forms a base near the top of the internal frame on my pack. I then place my tent, Jetboil, and a small bag of miscellaneous items not needed during the day on top. I then close the pack liner dry bag.
        >
        > I have a tall and skinny dry bag that goes in one of the side pockets of the pack and contains items that I may need during the day. My camera is in one of the hip belt pockets in a ziplock. In a bad rain storm I would put the camera into the side pocket dry bag. Then cover the entire pack with the cuben pack cover.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "john_friend" <yahoo@> wrote:
        > >
        > > This is my plan also. One dry bag for the down sleeping bag. One dry
        > > bag for all clothes I'm not wearing. I went through the rest of my pack
        > > list and everything else in the pack list could either get wet just fine
        > > or will be in a ziplock already.
        > > I figure a nice feature of having all my clothes in a single dry bag is
        > > I can bring that dry bag under the tarp and have easier access to all my
        > > clothes. I think I may also have a couple large ziplocks for dirty
        > > clothes (e.g. socks/underwear that need to be washed) so they don't
        > > taint the clean clothes.
        > > I'm using Seat-To-Summit Ultra-Sil Drysacks
        > > <http://www.rei.com/product/777725/sea-to-summit-ultra-sil-dry-sack>
        > > (bought on sale at REI). A 13 liter for my sleeping bag and a 20 liter
        > > for the clothes. Neither dry bag will be completely full (which makes
        > > them easier to use).
        > > --John
        > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I recommend a minimum of two guaranteed waterproof dry sacks. One for
        > > the
        > > > sleeping bag which I like to lay flat, like a squished pancake at the
        > > > bottom of my pack and the bear canister vertically situated on top of
        > > the
        > > > center of that dry sack, that way, the metal edge of the canister is
        > > > cushioned, instead of rubbing up against inside-pack-fabric, for if
        > > you
        > > > have metal against fabric against rock or ground, guess what loses --
        > > yes,
        > > > the pack fabric.
        > > >
        > > > The other dry sack is for your dry clothes and down jacket and
        > > anything
        > > > else you want to keep clean. You might even want a third dry sack to
        > > > differentiate between clothing and equipment (such as a camera, etc)
        > > that
        > > > you don't want to get wet.
        > > >
        > > > One thing for dry sacks is to guarantee things stay dry if you fall
        > > over
        > > > crossing a stream and your pack gets wet that way. It can be a sunny
        > > day
        > > > and you still don't want stuff to get wet that you want to keep dry.
        > > >
        > > > Has such every happened -- yes I've seen it happen once. Not to me,
        > > but to
        > > > my hiking partner.
        > > > -------------------------------------------------
        > > > Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research
        > > > links)
        > > > _
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > On Tue, Jun 25, 2013 at 5:01 PM, Darryl dabrahms@ wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > **
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > In reading messages about Rain and Drying Strategies, it is apparent
        > > that
        > > > > using one or more dry bags is a good practice. I would appreciate
        > > > > suggestions on best configurations of dry bags. For example, should
        > > I
        > > > > purchase one large dry bag which will act as an inner liner for my
        > > whole
        > > > > backpack or a smaller dry bag for my down sleeping bag and down vest
        > > > > together, or a combination of multi-size dry bags for different
        > > categories?
        > > > > Which sizes and quantities will provide the most efficient
        > > protection from
        > > > > the weather (or other benefits)?
        > > > > Thanks again,
        > > > > Darryl
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • ravi_jmt2013
        ... That s definitely an interesting idea. What would probably prevent me from doing that is that my cuben tent (hexamid) is relatively fragile when it comes
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 26, 2013
          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Gail" <forgetwho@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ravi, I do what you do (sleeping bag and sleep clothes in a dry bag on the bottom of my pack, my bear can centered vertically on top of that), but then I stuff my tent, loose, all around the bear can to keep it centered. And I push that way down to fill up all the empty spaces. If you did that, would you have room to put the rest of your clothes in a dry bag on top of the bear can?
          >

          That's definitely an interesting idea. What would probably prevent me from doing that is that my cuben tent (hexamid) is relatively fragile when it comes to abrasion. So I would worry about the contact between the cuben material and the edges of the Bearikade canister which I've read can cause abrasion to packs. I'm a bit paranoid about my cuben gear given the sensitivity to abrasion and high cost.
        • Roleigh Martin
          Good paranoia, the edge of the Bearikade can get rough due to scratches on rock. Mine is. ... Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 26, 2013
            Good paranoia, the edge of the Bearikade can get rough due to scratches on rock.  Mine is.  

            -------------------------------------------------
            Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
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