Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:

Expand Messages
  • robert shattuck
    Rick, I forgot to add that you don t need a multi-tool to open a bear canister . . . I found a quarter once, with a hole in it and I ran some cord through the
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 19, 2013
    • 1 Attachment
    • 1.1 MB
    Rick, 

     I forgot to add that you don"t need a multi-tool to open a bear canister . . . I found a quarter once, with a hole in it and I ran some cord through the hole, which helps when digging it out of your pocket . . . been using this for years as well . . .  here's a pic of both the quarter and the blade. 

    bob
     


    forkfestreview.wordpress.com
    sparklefart.blogspot.com

    http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




  • rand
    1) You note iodine pills....would recommend moving to chlorine dioxide 2) I didn t see any other water purification method....not sure if you re part of the
    Message 2 of 15 , Jun 19, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      1) You note iodine pills....would recommend moving to chlorine dioxide

      2) I didn't see any other water purification method....not sure if you're part of the "water in the Sierra is safe" crowd

      3) Didn't see tent stakes

      4) Didn't see hiking poles

      Rand :-)
    • Chris
      ... Thanks. Tent includes poles, will check out cholorine, and I bring poles, they are in the pile, not sure why not on the list. I m part of the safe
      Message 3 of 15 , Jun 19, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, rand <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > 1) You note iodine pills....would recommend moving to chlorine dioxide
        >
        > 2) I didn't see any other water purification method....not sure if you're part of the "water in the Sierra is safe" crowd
        >
        > 3) Didn't see tent stakes
        >
        > 4) Didn't see hiking poles
        >
        > Rand :-)
        >

        Thanks. Tent includes poles, will check out cholorine, and I bring poles, they are in the pile, not sure why not on the list. I'm part of the 'safe water' crowd - 3 trips no issues.
      • Ned Tibbits
        Regarding bringing multiple Bic lighters, I do this, but it wasn’t until our recent Snow Intermediate Course from Echo Summit to Donner Summit that I
        Message 4 of 15 , Jun 20, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Regarding bringing multiple Bic lighters, I do this, but it wasn’t until our recent Snow Intermediate Course from Echo Summit to Donner Summit that I realized that the conditions where one goes down will cause the other to go down, too. Bringing a different kind of fire starter solved this problem! (The strike-anywhere matches were not affected by the high humidity condition).
           
          Regarding a small multi-tool, I’ve always wanted to do this, but haven’t yet, just bringing a medium-sized Swiss Army knife with magnifying glass (yet a third fire starter). I had occasion to wish I had that multi-tool on the above trip because I broke a tent pole on the first night of seven and had to improvise a tent-stake-splint and duct tape repair for the rest of the trip! The tool would have allowed me to wire-tie the split tubing or at least squeeze it together better before taping. Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc..
           
           
          Ned Tibbits, Director
          Mountain Education
          www.mountaineducation.org
           
          Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 8:28 AM
          Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:
           
           


          Rick, 
           
          1. Socks, I usually bring two pairs for hiking and one pair for sleeping. I find that the a super-light, cheap pair work best for sleeping as I am not looking for warmth, so much as just something between my skin and the bag.
           
          2. Knife, multi-tool . . . I will no doubt need one some day, but I can't tell yo when the last time was I actually wished I'd had one.  I use an "olfa-touch knife" just an an exacto blade in a little spring loaded case, about as big a quarter and weight nothing. I bring a few of them, but always have one in my pocket.
           
          What do you really need to cut with a big, burly multi-tool––and to those of you out there, reading along––what have you had to use your multi-tool for that a simple exacto blade device wouldn't  suffice?

          3. No comment.

          . . . as for bringing BIC LIGHTERS . . . why back them up with matches . . . just bring another BIC lighter . . . like my exacto blade devices, BIC lighters weigh nothing, you can carry several of them and don't need to ever have it in the back of your head that your matches might get wet.
           
          BOB
           
          http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480



        • robert shattuck
          Bringing a different kind of fire starter solved this problem! (The strike-anywhere matches were not affected by the high humidity condition) Ned, Good point
          Message 5 of 15 , Jun 20, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            "Bringing a different kind of fire starter solved this problem! (The strike-anywhere matches were not affected by the high humidity condition)"
             

            Ned, 

            Good point . . . I've just never had one of my bics fail me while winter camping or in the heat of summer . . . to be honest though, I've had them not work on occasion, but when you pack three or four of them, you're always going to find one that works, in my experience . . .  and they weigh nothing. 

            Bob




          • Larry Beck
            I usually keep a bic lighter in my pants pocket. It keeps it warm and I don t count it in my backpacking weight spread sheet. I do always carry some strike
            Message 6 of 15 , Jun 20, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I usually keep a bic lighter in my pants pocket. It keeps it warm and I don't count it in my backpacking weight spread sheet. I do always carry some strike anywhere matches though.. :)
               
              Larry

              From: robert shattuck <bobolonius@...>
              To: Jmtgroup <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:20 PM
              Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:

               
              "Bringing a different kind of fire starter solved this problem! (The strike-anywhere matches were not affected by the high humidity condition)"
               

              Ned, 

              Good point . . . I've just never had one of my bics fail me while winter camping or in the heat of summer . . . to be honest though, I've had them not work on occasion, but when you pack three or four of them, you're always going to find one that works, in my experience . . .  and they weigh nothing. 

              Bob






            • Robert
              Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc.. Looks
              Message 7 of 15 , Jun 20, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                " Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc.."

                Looks like all you're missing now are some vice grips, channel locks, screwdrivers, a hammer, and a fold up shovel and you'll have it covered! : )

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Tibbits" <ned@...> wrote:
                >
                > Regarding bringing multiple Bic lighters, I do this, but it wasn't until our recent Snow Intermediate Course from Echo Summit to Donner Summit that I realized that the conditions where one goes down will cause the other to go down, too. Bringing a different kind of fire starter solved this problem! (The strike-anywhere matches were not affected by the high humidity condition).
                >
                > Regarding a small multi-tool, I've always wanted to do this, but haven't yet, just bringing a medium-sized Swiss Army knife with magnifying glass (yet a third fire starter). I had occasion to wish I had that multi-tool on the above trip because I broke a tent pole on the first night of seven and had to improvise a tent-stake-splint and duct tape repair for the rest of the trip! The tool would have allowed me to wire-tie the split tubing or at least squeeze it together better before taping. Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc..
                >
                >
                > Ned Tibbits, Director
                > Mountain Education
                > www.mountaineducation.org
                >
                > From: robert shattuck
                > Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 8:28 AM
                > To: Jmtgroup
                > Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Rick,
                >
                > 1. Socks, I usually bring two pairs for hiking and one pair for sleeping. I find that the a super-light, cheap pair work best for sleeping as I am not looking for warmth, so much as just something between my skin and the bag.
                >
                > 2. Knife, multi-tool . . . I will no doubt need one some day, but I can't tell yo when the last time was I actually wished I'd had one. I use an "olfa-touch knife" just an an exacto blade in a little spring loaded case, about as big a quarter and weight nothing. I bring a few of them, but always have one in my pocket.
                >
                > What do you really need to cut with a big, burly multi-tool––and to those of you out there, reading along––what have you had to use your multi-tool for that a simple exacto blade device wouldn't suffice?
                >
                >
                > 3. No comment.
                >
                >
                > . . . as for bringing BIC LIGHTERS . . . why back them up with matches . . . just bring another BIC lighter . . . like my exacto blade devices, BIC lighters weigh nothing, you can carry several of them and don't need to ever have it in the back of your head that your matches might get wet.
                >
                > BOB
                >
                > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
                >
              • brucelem12
                Ha ha...though I m lacking the much more important knowledge/training/experience Ned carries, I m the same way carrying a kit of repair/what if doo dads.
                Message 8 of 15 , Jun 21, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Ha ha...though I'm lacking the much more important knowledge/training/experience Ned carries, I'm the same way carrying a kit of repair/what if doo dads. Relatively light and minimal, but it still adds up to nearly a quarter pound. Unfortunately, what this usually means is that I am simply the handy repair supply person for everyone else. :)
                  Bruce

                  --- "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                  Looks like all you're missing now are some vice grips, channel locks, screwdrivers, a hammer, and a fold up shovel and you'll have it covered! : )

                  ---- "Ned Tibbits" <ned@> wrote:
                  -------- Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc.. --------------
                  Ned Tibbits, Director
                  Mountain Education
                  www.mountaineducation.org
                • Ned Tibbits
                  You guys crack me up! It always seems that with our groups something usually breaks or needs repair, so we try to anticipate fixing whatever it might be.
                  Message 9 of 15 , Jun 21, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You guys crack me up! It always seems that with our groups something usually breaks or needs repair, so we try to anticipate fixing whatever it might be. Equipment does fail from time to time and when it does, its like a shoelace breaking, never fun nor expected!
                     
                     
                    Ned Tibbits, Director
                    Mountain Education
                    www.mountaineducation.org
                     
                    Sent: Friday, June 21, 2013 6:20 AM
                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:
                     
                     

                    Ha ha...though I'm lacking the much more important knowledge/training/experience Ned carries, I'm the same way carrying a kit of repair/what if doo dads. Relatively light and minimal, but it still adds up to nearly a quarter pound. Unfortunately, what this usually means is that I am simply the handy repair supply person for everyone else. :)
                    Bruce

                    --- "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                    Looks like all you're missing now are some vice grips, channel locks, screwdrivers, a hammer, and a fold up shovel and you'll have it covered! : )

                    ---- "Ned Tibbits" <ned@> wrote:
                    -------- Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc.. --------------
                    Ned Tibbits, Director
                    Mountain Education
                    www.mountaineducation.org

                  • Robert
                    Ned, one can never have enough bailing wire and duct tape! :)
                    Message 10 of 15 , Jun 21, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Ned, one can never have enough bailing wire and duct tape! :)

                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Tibbits" <ned@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > You guys crack me up! It always seems that with our groups something usually breaks or needs repair, so we try to anticipate fixing whatever it might be. Equipment does fail from time to time and when it does, its like a shoelace breaking, never fun nor expected!
                      >
                      >
                      > Ned Tibbits, Director
                      > Mountain Education
                      > www.mountaineducation.org
                      >
                      > From: brucelem12
                      > Sent: Friday, June 21, 2013 6:20 AM
                      > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Gear list and questions:
                      >
                      >
                      > Ha ha...though I'm lacking the much more important knowledge/training/experience Ned carries, I'm the same way carrying a kit of repair/what if doo dads. Relatively light and minimal, but it still adds up to nearly a quarter pound. Unfortunately, what this usually means is that I am simply the handy repair supply person for everyone else. :)
                      > Bruce
                      >
                      > --- "Robert" <rnperky@> wrote:
                      > Looks like all you're missing now are some vice grips, channel locks, screwdrivers, a hammer, and a fold up shovel and you'll have it covered! : )
                      >
                      > ---- "Ned Tibbits" <ned@> wrote:
                      > -------- Now I know that I need a better repair kit that includes some zip-ties, a little bailing wire, a small tubing clamp, the requisite duct tape, etc.. --------------
                      > Ned Tibbits, Director
                      > Mountain Education
                      > www.mountaineducation.org
                      >
                    • Byron Nevins
                      My buddy who lives in North Carolina organized a 3-day Appalachian Trail backpacking trip with 3 other friends. All beginners. He gave them each a copy of
                      Message 11 of 15 , Jun 22, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        My buddy who lives in North Carolina organized a 3-day Appalachian Trail backpacking trip with 3 other friends.  All beginners.  He gave them each a copy of his gear list and admonished them in advance:  "If it isn't on this list -- DON'T BRING IT!  The list has been fine-tuned over decades".

                        So they are at the first night's camp and he hears an odd metal sound.  He wanders over to the tent of one of these guys, and the guy is pounding in his tent stakes with a full-sized carpenter's hammer.  "I thought you had forgotten to put it on the list" he explained.

                        That night one of the guys said "I brought a fifth of Scotch!"  Which actually *is* on the list as an optional item.  Then he pulls out the fifth of scotch.  In its original super-heavy glass bottle.

                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.