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Re: Proper application of Leukotape

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  • pgonzales147
    -- In particular, since it is not flexible tape Marty: I pre-emptively use Leukotape on my treks and find it quite flexible. I ve never used Tincture of
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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      -- " In particular, since it is not flexible tape"

      Marty:

      I pre-emptively use Leukotape on my treks and find it quite flexible. I've never used Tincture of Benzoin as I find the tape stays put without it. Within a short distance I don't even feel it's there. It comes off readily enough with some effort. You can clean the area and re-apply after a few days. The most tedious part is getting it unstuck from the few areas where it sticks to your socks.

      I buy some 3x5 labels from an office supply store and remove the labels and use the release paper backing to place various pre-cut sizes of the tape that I'll be needing. This is much easier than trying to getting it off the roll in the field. It's a pain if it gets hot. I've also wrapped a length of tape around a straw to fit my needs rather than carry the whole roll.
    • Robert
      Leukotape sticks really well without tincture of Benzoine. I agree with the previous poster that the adhesive tends to weep through the material and get on
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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        Leukotape sticks really well without tincture of Benzoine. I agree with the previous poster that the adhesive tends to 'weep' through the material and get on your sock. I have found it almost easier to just add layers to it as it wears down as opposed to trying to peel it off and re-apply. Just make sure there isn't a blister or loose skin underneath it when you peel it off, as it will pull skin with it. I switched to cloth tape a few years back due to the 'weeping' of the adhesive. I like the idea of putting pre-cut pieces on release paper as the previous poster mentioned as well. It will help keep the tape from sticking to itself after getting warm.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "pgonzales147" <pgonzales147@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -- " In particular, since it is not flexible tape"
        >
        > Marty:
        >
        > I pre-emptively use Leukotape on my treks and find it quite flexible. I've never used Tincture of Benzoin as I find the tape stays put without it. Within a short distance I don't even feel it's there. It comes off readily enough with some effort. You can clean the area and re-apply after a few days. The most tedious part is getting it unstuck from the few areas where it sticks to your socks.
        >
        > I buy some 3x5 labels from an office supply store and remove the labels and use the release paper backing to place various pre-cut sizes of the tape that I'll be needing. This is much easier than trying to getting it off the roll in the field. It's a pain if it gets hot. I've also wrapped a length of tape around a straw to fit my needs rather than carry the whole roll.
        >
      • John Ladd
        I m no expert on Leukotape, nor on taping heels (my problem area seems to be toes). The only thing I can add is that you can practice at home. The main issue
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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          I'm no expert on Leukotape, nor on taping heels (my problem area seems to be toes). The only thing I can add is that you can practice at home. The main issue with any taping is whether your technique stays in place without puckering. You can try your techniques at home (without T of B) and just leave it on for a few days through regular street use, showers, etc. Once you have a method that works that way, i.e., stays in place well, you can try the T of B. 

          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279


          On Tue, Jun 18, 2013 at 5:39 PM, martypicco <marty@...> wrote:
           

          Hi blister experts,

          I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).

          Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.

          Thanks for your help.

          Marty


        • Roleigh Martin
          Marty, Besides the other advice you ve gotten, consider small strips of tape instead of one long tape. A couple of strips 2-4 in length is better than one
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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            Marty,

            Besides the other advice you've gotten, consider small strips of tape instead of one long tape.  A couple of strips 2-4" in length is better than one 5-8" in length  If you can do not overlap the tape, allow the foot's skin to stretch.

            Personally I alternate between Leuckotape and Omnifix tape -- the adhesive affect doesn't occur with Omnifix.  I favor the Leuckotape on the back of the ankle and ridge of the foot, while I favor Omnifix on the sole and toes.

            Roleigh
            -------------------------------------------------
            Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
            _



            On Tue, Jun 18, 2013 at 8:39 PM, martypicco <marty@...> wrote:
             

            Hi blister experts,

            I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).

            Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.

            Thanks for your help.

            Marty


          • Peter Klein
            Yup, putting pre-cut sections of L-tape on a slippery backing (office labels, address lables) is a great idea! Ever try to get L-tape off the roll when the
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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              Yup, putting pre-cut sections of L-tape on a slippery backing (office labels, address
              lables) is a great idea!  Ever try to get L-tape off the roll when the temp is in the
              20's??

              I use it on my heels a preventative care.  Nothing special.  Just be sure your skin
              is dry before you apply it.  Might want to round off the corners of the tape to keep
              them from coming loose.  With the backing, that becomes much easier.

              With regular showering, the tape will stay on for 3-4 days.  

              Pete
            • Sierracanon
              I have really large bunions, and those almost always get blisters. I started using Leukotape this year, and it really works great. It sticks really well, and
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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                I have really large bunions, and those almost always get blisters. I started using Leukotape this year, and it really works great. It sticks really well, and I've had it sometimes last a couple of days between changes. I've found it works best if the area where you are putting is really clean. And last three trips... no blisters.

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "martypicco" <marty@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi blister experts,
                >
                > I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).
                >
                > Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.
                >
                > Thanks for your help.
                >
                > Marty
                >
              • Dale Stuart
                I would suggest applying a small piece of tape to your foot overnight to ensure there is no allergic reactions to the adhesive. When I had to use leuktape on
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 18, 2013
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                  I would suggest applying a small piece of tape to your foot overnight to ensure there is no allergic reactions to the adhesive.

                  When I had to use leuktape on one heal (old pair of boots) I put a horizontal 3" piece across the lower heal then an addition 4" piece  overlapping the horizontal piece going up the heal (heal stretched), making a inverted "T" on my heal.  The tape is awesome and stays on for 4-5 days with no trouble even with wet stream crossings. Never had to use the bezoin, tape stuck well on its own.

                   
                  -Dale 


                  From: martypicco <marty@...>
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 5:39 PM
                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] Proper application of Leukotape

                   
                  Hi blister experts,

                  I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).

                  Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.

                  Thanks for your help.

                  Marty



                • kneecreak
                  I love my leukotape. The roll is way too big to carry backpacking. I tried putting some on a small (3/8 ) dowel. It was almost impossible to remove again.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 19, 2013
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                    I love my leukotape. The roll is way too big to carry backpacking. I tried putting some on a small (3/8") dowel. It was almost impossible to remove again. Now, I have a section of 1/2" pvc pipe that extends just a touch beyond the width of the tape. The larger diameter seems to help with unrolling in the field. I put the pipe in a vise for wrapping the tape, then cut off the excess pipe.

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Dale Stuart <onetwolaugh@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I would suggest applying a small piece of tape to your foot overnight to ensure there is no allergic reactions to the adhesive.
                    >
                    > When I had to use leuktape on one heal (old pair of boots) I put a horizontal 3" piece across the lower heal then an addition 4" piece  overlapping the horizontal piece going up the heal (heal stretched), making a inverted "T" on my heal.  The tape is awesome and stays on for 4-5 days with no trouble even with wet stream crossings. Never had to use the bezoin, tape stuck well on its own.
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > -Dale 
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: martypicco <marty@...>
                    > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 5:39 PM
                    > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Proper application of Leukotape
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > Hi blister experts,
                    >
                    > I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).
                    >
                    > Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.
                    >
                    > Thanks for your help.
                    >
                    > Marty
                    >
                  • martypicco
                    As always thanks for the great advice! Marty
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 19, 2013
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                      As always thanks for the great advice!

                      Marty


                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "martypicco" <marty@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi blister experts,
                      >
                      > I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).
                      >
                      > Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.
                      >
                      > Thanks for your help.
                      >
                      > Marty
                      >
                    • Don Amundson
                      You ve had plenty of advise already but.... My experience with Leukotape is that it requires no base of benzoin to help it adhere to the skin. It sticks
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 19, 2013
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                        You've had plenty of advise already but....   My experience with Leukotape is that it requires no base of benzoin to help it adhere to the skin.  It sticks well enough on its own. I've always carried compound tincture of benzoin (ampules) for use with duct tape that doesn't stick so well on it's own.  There are other uses for benzoin that might make it worth bringing on the trail for you.

                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tincture_of_benzoin
                        http://www.amazon.com/Tincture-Benzoin-Ampules-Per-Pack/dp/B00475FYO6


                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        From: marty@...
                        Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2013 21:55:15 +0000
                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Proper application of Leukotape

                         
                        As always thanks for the great advice!

                        Marty

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "martypicco" <marty@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi blister experts,
                        >
                        > I have had problems with blisters on my heels repeatedly, so I've heeded some advice from this group and purchased tincture of bezoin and leukotape, planning to proactively tape my heels before I start (in about a week).
                        >
                        > Having never used this stuff before, I'm a bit nervous about its "once it's on, it's on" property. In particular, since it is not flexible tape and I would like to cover a significant portion of my heel, I'm wondering if there is a specific technique/pattern to be followed that will allow the skin on the back of the heel to flex properly. For example, when taping should the foot be in a neutral position, or tilted fully forward/back, etc? I'd hate to create a problem while attempting to avoid one.
                        >
                        > Thanks for your help.
                        >
                        > Marty
                        >


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