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What does 0% of normal snowpack mean?

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  • woodyrtt
    According to the CA Department of Water Resources, as of May 31, snowpack in the southern Sierras was 0% of normal for the date. Comments?
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 2, 2013
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      According to the CA Department of Water Resources, as of May 31, snowpack in the southern Sierras was 0% of normal for the date. Comments?

      http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action

      Rod
    • John Ladd
      Presumably if there is usually some snow at 10,000 feet this late in the year, and none now, you d get 0%. However, there could be snow over 10,000 feet. I
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2013
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        Presumably if there is usually some snow at 10,000 feet this late in the year, and none now, you'd get 0%. However, there could be snow over 10,000 feet. I think the figures are based on snow depth readings that mostly are about 10k feet.

        John Dittli can probably confirm or correct my supposition.

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279


        On Sun, Jun 2, 2013 at 8:17 AM, woodyrtt <rod.tayler@...> wrote:
         

        According to the CA Department of Water Resources, as of May 31, snowpack in the southern Sierras was 0% of normal for the date. Comments?

        http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action

        Rod


      • John
        June 1 SWE is almost exclusively estimated from snow sensor data as there are usually no manual courses measured after May 1 surveys. So yes, 0% should
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 2, 2013
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          June 1 SWE is almost exclusively estimated from snow sensor data as there are usually no manual courses measured after May 1 surveys.

          So yes, 0% should indicate that there is no snow on any snow sensors (snow pillows) in the souther watersheds (San Joaquin-Kern). However as John Ladd stated, there could be (and is) some snow remaining in areas other than the sensors.

          John

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
          >
          > Presumably if there is usually some snow at 10,000 feet this late in the
          > year, and none now, you'd get 0%. However, there could be snow over 10,000
          > feet. I think the figures are based on snow depth readings that mostly are
          > about 10k feet.
          >
          > John Dittli can probably confirm or correct my supposition.
          >
          > John Curran Ladd
          > 1616 Castro Street
          > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
          > 415-648-9279
          >
          >
          > On Sun, Jun 2, 2013 at 8:17 AM, woodyrtt <rod.tayler@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > According to the CA Department of Water Resources, as of May 31, snowpack
          > > in the southern Sierras was 0% of normal for the date. Comments?
          > >
          > > http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action
          > >
          > > Rod
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
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