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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Current conditions

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  • John Ladd
    ... Yes. Assuming there is much snow left, there will probably be quite a deep trench you will walk in, created by prior NoBo PCT hikers, and deepened by SoBo
    Message 1 of 7 , May 26, 2013
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      On Sun, May 26, 2013 at 6:43 AM, k2poohtri <k2pooh15@...> wrote:
      Do you think the ice ax would be overkill by mid-June?

      Yes. Assuming there is much snow left, there will probably be quite a deep trench you will walk in, created by prior NoBo PCT hikers, and deepened by SoBo JMT hikers.

      It's possible that there will be some icy stretches if you start early in the morning and get up high before the sun reaches the snow but, if so, wait until they soften up.

      Afternoon postholing may be the biggest issue, if any. Getting over a pass by noon should help with this.

      As you recognize, if you do carry an ice ax, get some training. It's not intuitive how to use for self-arrest. Self-belay is more intuitive and easier to learn, maybe simple enough that this video and some practice would do the trick.


      My opinion only.

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • k2poohtri
      Thanks John, now my UL BP is no longer UL as safety is first. I ve just purchased Kahtoola microspikes http://www.kahtoola.com/microspikes_details.php and have
      Message 2 of 7 , May 26, 2013
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        Thanks John, now my UL BP is no longer UL as safety is first. I've just purchased Kahtoola microspikes http://www.kahtoola.com/microspikes_details.php and have an ice axe rental on hold at Wilson's Sports in Bishop.

        Ive been watching videos and the first snow field I hit I'll be practicing self-arrestsing. So if you see someone in the Donohue Pass area just flopping around, kind of playing in the snow, that could be me. :-)

        Korina

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Sun, May 26, 2013 at 6:43 AM, k2poohtri <k2pooh15@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Do you think the ice ax would be overkill by mid-June?
        >
        >
        > Yes. Assuming there is much snow left, there will probably be quite a deep
        > trench you will walk in, created by prior NoBo PCT hikers, and deepened by
        > SoBo JMT hikers.
        >
        > It's *possible* that there will be some icy stretches if you start early in
        > the morning and get up high before the sun reaches the snow but, if so,
        > wait until they soften up.
        >
        > Afternoon postholing may be the biggest issue, if any. Getting over a pass
        > by noon should help with this.
        >
        > As you recognize, if you do carry an ice ax, get some training. It's not
        > intuitive how to use for self-arrest. Self-belay is more intuitive and
        > easier to learn, maybe simple enough that this video and some practice
        > would do the trick.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8a8qhXoi0s
        >
        > My opinion only.
        >
        > John Curran Ladd
        > 1616 Castro Street
        > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
        > 415-648-9279
        >
      • John Ladd
        Another Facebook current conditions report, this one from Vince Leo: Waiting out a storm in Mammoth Lakes, going to hit the trail on Wednesday. The JMT is
        Message 3 of 7 , May 27, 2013
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          Another Facebook current conditions report, this one from Vince Leo:

          Waiting out a storm in Mammoth Lakes, going to hit the trail on
          Wednesday. The JMT is hikeable - depending on the definition of this
          term. On the north sides of passes and mountains, there's significant
          amounts of snow above 9.000 - 9.500 ft., on the south sides and
          plateaus, above 10.000ft.

          I could NOT have done the 60 miles from Happy Isles to Reds Meadows
          without hiking poles.

          Unless you you've hiked it before, I recommend usng GPS, as you will
          definitely lose the actual trail quite often.

          Night temperatures: freezing! Mid 20s in Tuolumne Meadows, 10s above
          9.000ft. The moisture from breathing is frozen all over my tent every
          morning.

          BUT: it is absolutely beautiful up there. Had the trails, passes,
          peaks, camp sites all to myself. Have not passed any JMT/PCT hikers
          and not encountered any northbound hikers either.

          It's the hike of a lifetime already. See you up there!
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