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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Clouds Rest junction

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  • John Ladd
    My worst mouse night was just as others have noted. Right at the melting snow line -- in my case just North of Selden Pass in early June of a moderate snow
    Message 1 of 37 , May 23, 2013
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      My worst mouse night was just as others have noted. Right at the melting snow line -- in my case just North of Selden Pass in early June of a moderate snow year. I think that they are maximum hungry just as the snow retreats. Might be a reason to either stop and camp either well before you get to snow line -- or go over the pass, and then continue well past snow line on the other side.

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279


      On Thu, May 23, 2013 at 9:51 AM, <ned@...> wrote:
       

      Roleigh,
       
      Obviously, the little buggers are after salt, so their seeking out our sweaty gear as a source of it for their diets can happen anytime, but I keep my eyes pealed for the raiders mostly in the months when they come out of hibernation or from under the snow, so primarily right now (May, June, July—depending on when the pack melts out).  (...not bad for such a long sentence!)
       
       
      Ned Tibbits, Director
      Mountain Education
      www.mountaineducation.org
       
      Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 8:07 AM
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Clouds Rest junction
       
       

      Ned, you live out there in the mountains, what time of the year do these incidents occur with you?
       
      Roleigh
       
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      On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 11:04 AM, Ned Tibbits <ned@...> wrote:
       
      Hey, you know Roleigh, I wonder if it is more of a time-of-year thing with the rodents as I’ve had a lot of chewing incidents, but they were all about this time of year, springtime, when the salt-hungry little suckers are more than willing to chew on boots, laces, pole handles, packs, tents, etc..
       
      Even had one marmot waddle up to me while on camera teaching about something at Palisade Lake on the snow and start chewing on my boots and laces, quite unconcerned about my movement or talking!
       
      Had another set of mice chew through my tent to get at my dinner leftovers.
      Of course, I had the proverbial raider-chipmunk chew into my pack.
      Woke up to a deer staring me in the face while another nibbled away at my hiking pole...
       
       
       
      Ned Tibbits, Director
      Mountain Education
      www.mountaineducation.org
       
      Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 7:41 AM
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Clouds Rest junction
       
       
      I have never had a rodent chew on my hiking poles which are used to hold up my tarp tents.  I do bring in my pack into my tent though.  Others in the group have emptied their packs and hung them upside down outside their tent.  No animal has ever bothered their packs.  If there was nothing to hang the packs on, they'd just stand them up against a rock or something.  I've been doing week+ hiking in the High Sierras 13 years straight now.
       
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      On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 10:32 AM, walkingwomad <helenbeckers@...> wrote:
       



      Hi guys!
      I need my trekking poles for setting up my tent. So they'll be actually ON the ground... Any ideas how I could keep the rodents off? (Getting another tent is not really an option... I just bought a new tarptent notch and I didn't think of chewing rodents ;c)
      Thanks!
      Helen



      --- In mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com, Bill Heiser <bill@...> wrote:
      >
      > My practice has been to hang the pack from a tree branch (not high up,
      > like one would hang a food back, just as high as I can reach). I do the
      > same thing with my trekking poles. And I put any loose items like water
      > bottles, bags for the Sawyer Squeeze filter, etc in the pack as well.
      >
      > I bring my shoes into the tent with me. I've heard of people leaving
      > them in the tent vestibule, but losing one or both of them to an animal
      > would end the trip & require a likely very difficult exit.
      >
      >
      >
      >

       
       


    • Bill Cathey
      I was using my boots as part of my pillow system this past week when a porcupine chewed on my pack. Maybe I should be glad it got to my pack first ;o) Although
      Message 37 of 37 , May 26, 2013
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        I was using my boots as part of my pillow system this past week when a porcupine chewed on my pack. Maybe I should be glad it got to my pack first ;o)

        Although I'd love to see a porcupine. They're really cool animals.

        bill

        On May 22, 2013, at 10:06 AM, Dittli-Goethals <johndittli@...> wrote:

         

        My ski poles still have nibble marks on the handles from some rodent somewhere. I think they will only go after the grips, so if supporting a tent, they might have a hard time shinnying up the shaft. As well over the years among many other minor gnawings: I've had a ball cap eaten (they left the plastic bill), a washed and drying bandana chewed, boots gnawed by a Porcupine (fortunately I was using them as a pillow at the time, an exciting awakening!), and my favorite; my bivy sack with sleeping bag, pulled ~100' from camp and partially down a Marmot hole.


        JD
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