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Re: Couple questions for June hike

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  • sanfran_rwood
    I haven t seen any other response to this so... ... NO. Used TP goes in the bear canister. The reason is the same as why it gets packed out in the first
    Message 1 of 31 , May 13, 2013
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      I haven't seen any other response to this so...

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Dan" <shortys7777@...> wrote:
      >
      > As for the TP my main concern was can you leave it in your pack
      > at night? leave it near your bear canister? Not planning on putting
      > it in the canister for sanitary reasons.

      NO. Used TP goes in the bear canister. The reason is the same as why it gets packed out in the first place, only more so: human feces smells fascinating to many backcountry critters, and you can guarantee bears are in the group.

      It's probably because of our rich diet, but it might be simply the fact that we are a minuscule portion of the experience of backcountry animals and we smell exotic. Animals investigate their territory, and dig up our poo.

      Any bears nearby will smell your used TP far more easily than freeze-dried food or toothpaste, for example, so the risk is at least as high. Put it in a bag, put that in a ziplock bag, then put that in another one. But at night, yeah: it goes in the bear canister.


      I use used coffee bean bags — the brown paper ones we buy bulk coffee in with the wire clasp as my innermost container. Easy to open and close, aesthetically opaque. That goes in a ziplock bag with the unused wet wipes pack. At night, that goes in the top of the bear canister, lying on top of the ditty bag with the toothpaste and toothbrush. A separate ziplock bag with unused TP is in the tent with me in case of overnight need, but I've gotten pretty good at making sure that doesn't happen.

      But, honestly: if your used TP is in your tent, you might as well put a neon sign up saying "Hey, Bear! Over here!".
      --
      Richard
    • Chris Pratt
      JD, I do something similar when it gets to cold for my bag. But, instead of draping the jacket over the bag I zip it up and slide it over the foot of the bag,
      Message 31 of 31 , May 15, 2013
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        JD,

        I do something similar when it gets to cold for my bag.  But, instead of draping the jacket over the bag I zip it up and slide it over the foot of the bag, like an oversized sock.  It reaches up around the knee area.  By doing this I don't have issues with the jacket sliding off the top of the bag during the night.  To me it seems that more heat is lost in the bottom part of the bag then the top. 

        Warm feet, happy sleep....

        Chris
        On 5/15/2013 11:48 AM, dittliphoto wrote:
         

        Yes, depending on how cold one sleeps, a 0° bag is overkill in the Sierra almost anytime!! 


        I've had many years of first hand experience trying to make a "light" bag work in shoulder (and winter) seasons in the Sierra. I prefer wearing long undies of some sort to keep the bag clean(er) and to avoid what I feel is a "clammy" feeling of skin against nylon.

        From my experience, wearing thickly insulated clothing (ie. down jacket) inside a sleeping bag makes other parts of your body (ie. legs and feet) colder. I attribute this to the heat from the core (torso) being trapped within the jacket and not warming the air space in the sleeping bag. 

        I have found that actually draping the down jacket outside the bag, or spreading it on top of my entire body between the bag, to be much more effective. Again, this is from several experiences over the years, your results may vary.

        JD
        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
        see book here  
        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Lauren Egert wrote:
        >
        > My apologies for the last email I just sent! It was intended to go to a friend of mine as we were debating this very issue and the efficacy of down with lots of clothes on (she was of the opinion more clothes between you and the down actually decreased the usefulness of the down) Anyway, I'm so sorry that it got sent to all of you and not my friend!
        >
        > Lauren
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Robert rnperky@...
        > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 10:54 AM
        > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Couple questions for June hike
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > I agree with Byron on this issue as well. A 0 degree bag is overkill for a summer hike of the JMT. Use a layering system with your clothes to increase your bags rating.
        >
        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Byron Nevins byron.nevins@ wrote:
        > >
        > > My $0.02. I used to do that -- bring a "hot" (read: heavy) bag and sleep
        > > near naked inside. Then I came to my senses and slashed the weight of the
        > > bag (20 oz quilt) and wear clothes underneath. If cold enough -- I wear
        > > ALL of my clothes underneath. They aren't doing me any good sitting around
        > > outside of my bag. If you carry it - use it!
        > >
        >

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