Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Cheyne–Stokes respiration

Expand Messages
  • John Ladd
    ... Tom - Assuming that I recognize that my nighttime breathing (or that of my companions) is taking on the pattern of Cheyne–Stokes respiration described in
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2 8:28 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      > Jo T,
      >
      > Might want to look up Cheyne Stokes Respiration in Wikipedia and other sources online. It can be brought on by altitude. When we were on McKinley, many of us were CSing all night, especially as we moved higher. I didn't experience it on the JMT, however.
      > Cheyne Stokes is a central sleep apnea, if memory serves. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, then an oral appliance could be effective.
      > Just knowing what the Cheyne Stokes symptoms are could serve to put you more at ease if it should show up.
      > Tom Jacobsen DDS
      >
      >
      Tom - Assuming that I recognize that my nighttime breathing (or that
      of my companions) is taking on the pattern of Cheyne–Stokes
      respiration described in the Wikipedia article, is there anything I
      need to do about it? I kind of gather not. Do I correctly understand
      that it is NOT an indication of any increased risk of other more
      serious altitude-related conditions like HAPE or HACE.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.