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bears and snoring

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  • Jo T
    Are bears liable to be attracted to snoring?=0) Okay, I m only half joking here.  After talking with my sleep doctor about portable options for my sleep
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 28, 2013

      Are bears liable to be attracted to snoring?=0)

      Okay, I'm only half joking here. 

      After talking with my sleep doctor about portable options for my sleep machine (for apnea), it looks like I'm going on my trip sans machine. The root cause of my apnea does not allow for mouth guards or nose strips as an alternative and the timing isn't right for me to get a new machine (they have ones now that supposedly go two days on a solar pack and fit in the palm of your hand!) via my insurance.

      Does anyone else here have experience with apnea on the trail? Did it get worse for you or just stay the same?  Also, I've heard that some people develop (temporary) apnea when they are at higher elevation -- so maybe if you don't normally have this issue, but developed it, when did it occur? I mean, did you find it worse above a certain elevation?

      And on the off-chance someone has tried one of the new portable apnea machines with solar packs, did it work for you? Or was it too darn hard to keep charged?

      I know this is kind of a niche question, but thought I'd ask.

      JoT.


    • John
      JoT, While on trail, I use a Z-Quiet mouthpiece as a substitute for my CPAP machine. It seems to work well for me, but it sounds like mouthpieces are off the
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 28, 2013
        JoT, 

        While on trail, I use a Z-Quiet mouthpiece as a substitute for my CPAP machine.  It seems to work well for me, but it sounds like mouthpieces are off the table  for you according to your original post. 

        John

        On Apr 28, 2013, at 10:01 PM, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:

         


        Are bears liable to be attracted to snoring?=0)

        Okay, I'm only half joking here. 

        After talking with my sleep doctor about portable options for my sleep machine (for apnea), it looks like I'm going on my trip sans machine. The root cause of my apnea does not allow for mouth guards or nose strips as an alternative and the timing isn't right for me to get a new machine (they have ones now that supposedly go two days on a solar pack and fit in the palm of your hand!) via my insurance.

        Does anyone else here have experience with apnea on the trail? Did it get worse for you or just stay the same?  Also, I've heard that some people develop (temporary) apnea when they are at higher elevation -- so maybe if you don't normally have this issue, but developed it, when did it occur? I mean, did you find it worse above a certain elevation?

        And on the off-chance someone has tried one of the new portable apnea machines with solar packs, did it work for you? Or was it too darn hard to keep charged?

        I know this is kind of a niche question, but thought I'd ask.

        JoT.


      • Larry Beck
        If anything, snoring, or any other human sound will scare off bears. Of course there are those bears that are so accustomed to humans that it doesn t matter
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29, 2013
          If anything, snoring, or any other "human" sound will scare off bears. Of course there are those bears that are so accustomed to humans that it doesn't matter anyway.


          From: Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...>
          To: JMT GROUP <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2013 10:01 PM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] bears and snoring

           

          Are bears liable to be attracted to snoring?=0)

          Okay, I'm only half joking here. 

          After talking with my sleep doctor about portable options for my sleep machine (for apnea), it looks like I'm going on my trip sans machine. The root cause of my apnea does not allow for mouth guards or nose strips as an alternative and the timing isn't right for me to get a new machine (they have ones now that supposedly go two days on a solar pack and fit in the palm of your hand!) via my insurance.

          Does anyone else here have experience with apnea on the trail? Did it get worse for you or just stay the same?  Also, I've heard that some people develop (temporary) apnea when they are at higher elevation -- so maybe if you don't normally have this issue, but developed it, when did it occur? I mean, did you find it worse above a certain elevation?

          And on the off-chance someone has tried one of the new portable apnea machines with solar packs, did it work for you? Or was it too darn hard to keep charged?

          I know this is kind of a niche question, but thought I'd ask.

          JoT.




        • JamesB
          My sleep study showed significantly decreased apnea events if I were side sleeping. On the trail, I do intentionally try to side sleep, with some success. I ve
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 29, 2013
            My sleep study showed significantly decreased apnea events if I were side sleeping. On the trail, I do intentionally try to side sleep, with some success.

            I've not been above 6,000 feet for years.

            If the trip is long, in the second and third weeks, fatigue begins to really set in, and I usually hang up the trip at that point.

            I have no idea of the actual rate of apnea events while on a trip, but from the fatigue, it would appear that the sleep I get is not that restful.

            Jim

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:


            > Does anyone else here have experience with apnea on the trail? Did it get worse for you or just stay the same? �Also, I've heard that some people develop (temporary) apnea when they are at higher elevation -- so maybe if you don't normally have this issue, but developed it, when did it occur? I mean, did you find it worse above a certain elevation?
            > And on the off-chance someone has tried one of the new portable apnea machines with solar packs, did it work for you? Or was it too darn hard to keep charged?
            > I know this is kind of a niche question, but thought I'd ask.
            > JoT.
            >
          • Jo T
            Yeah, I think I m gonna be nice and fatigued by the time I hit Whitney. I m naturally a side sleeper so that s a plus! But I m also taking 22 days (one zero)
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30, 2013

              Yeah, I think I'm gonna be nice and fatigued by the time I hit Whitney. I'm naturally a side sleeper so that's a plus! But I'm also taking 22 days (one zero) for the trip. The last time I camped without my machine, it was only one night, and I didn't sleep well, but I was also near a lot of people and too worried about everyone else's sleep to concentrate on mine. I'm doing this trip solo and later in the season so hopefully that won't be an issue too much.

              I also planned Whitney over two days so that should help.
              It's nice, though, to know others with apnea are out on the trail and still manage.

              Thanks,
              JoT.


              --- On Mon, 4/29/13, JamesB <jdbuch123@...> wrote:

              From: JamesB <jdbuch123@...>
              Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: bears and snoring
              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:21 PM

               


              My sleep study showed significantly decreased apnea events if I were side sleeping. On the trail, I do intentionally try to side sleep, with some success.

              I've not been above 6,000 feet for years.

              If the trip is long, in the second and third weeks, fatigue begins to really set in, and I usually hang up the trip at that point.

              I have no idea of the actual rate of apnea events while on a trip, but from the fatigue, it would appear that the sleep I get is not that restful.

              Jim

            • drj4507
              Jo T, Might want to look up Cheyne Stokes Respiration in Wikipedia and other sources online. It can be brought on by altitude. When we were on McKinley, many
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1, 2013
                Jo T,
                Might want to look up Cheyne Stokes Respiration in Wikipedia and other sources online. It can be brought on by altitude. When we were on McKinley, many of us were CSing all night, especially as we moved higher. I didn't experience it on the JMT, however.
                Cheyne Stokes is a central sleep apnea, if memory serves. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, then an oral appliance could be effective.
                Just knowing what the Cheyne Stokes symptoms are could serve to put you more at ease if it should show up.
                Tom Jacobsen DDS

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Jo T <jotslibrarylist@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Are bears liable to be attracted to snoring?=0)
                > Okay, I'm only half joking here. 
                > After talking with my sleep doctor about portable options for my sleep machine (for apnea), it looks like I'm going on my trip sans machine. The root cause of my apnea does not allow for mouth guards or nose strips as an alternative and the timing isn't right for me to get a new machine (they have ones now that supposedly go two days on a solar pack and fit in the palm of your hand!) via my insurance.
                > Does anyone else here have experience with apnea on the trail? Did it get worse for you or just stay the same?  Also, I've heard that some people develop (temporary) apnea when they are at higher elevation -- so maybe if you don't normally have this issue, but developed it, when did it occur? I mean, did you find it worse above a certain elevation?
                > And on the off-chance someone has tried one of the new portable apnea machines with solar packs, did it work for you? Or was it too darn hard to keep charged?
                > I know this is kind of a niche question, but thought I'd ask.
                > JoT.
                >
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