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gloves

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  • hdcii
    I d love to hear your suggestions for gloves while hiking in cold rain. Last year I did a quarter of the JMT and I used Smartwool liner gloves. They worked
    Message 1 of 32 , Apr 11, 2013
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      I'd love to hear your suggestions for gloves while hiking in cold rain. Last year I did a quarter of the JMT and I used Smartwool liner gloves. They worked good for the occasional brisk morning. However, one day it rained for 10 hours straight and was in the 40's (maybe cooler over the higher passes). My hands got too cool, obviously wet but the biggest problem was the gloves had large holes worn through the palm by day's end while using my hiking poles.

      I don't mind my hands getting wet as long as they are staying reasonably warm and the gloves last for all day hiking with poles. Appreciate your recommendations/links for good lightweight gloves.
    • cehauser1
      Inga: You make a great point. Lightweight backpackers like to promote multiple-use gear. But if one of the uses (wearing socks on hands during a meal) can
      Message 32 of 32 , Apr 4, 2014
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        Inga:

        You make a great point.  Lightweight backpackers like to promote multiple-use gear.  But if one of the uses (wearing socks on hands during a meal) can ruin the item for the other use (wearing socks on feet), that's a problem. Something I had not considered before.

        Thanks,
        Chris.


        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <Iaksamit@...> wrote :

        The episode that caused the addition of gloves and fleece hat to my standard kit was a freak cold front in Yosemite, late Aug/early Sep where it was 13F and the creek water froze. Trying to set up camp, cook and eat with socks on our hands (because we didn't have gloves) was a total pain. Very clumsy and we spilled on the socks, so then we had wet, messy socks. If you only need them for the top of Whitney that's one thing, but you might wish you had them other nights too. 

        Y
        es, for people trying to go lightweight or ultralight, wool sleeping socks make decent daytime gloves. Not so good if you are using hiking poles. 
        Also, they make great pot holders (non-synthetic socks). 
        Chris. 

        ---In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <lylebialk@...> wrote : 
        Your sleeping socks pulled on your hands for Whitney would solve the problem of cold hands while hanging out there. 


        Inga Aksamit
        Mobile: 415-470-1812
        Email: Iaksamit@...
        Twitter.com/IngaAksamit
        About Me: about.me/IngasAdventures
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