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Headlamps

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  • ravi_jmt2013
    I m curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail. I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 3 6:59 PM
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      I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.

      I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.

      This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.

      I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.

      However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.

      Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.
    • Robert
      Ravi, I have the Tikka that you listed, and it has worked well for me. You re not going to make a big dent in weight savings based on the cost, so I m not sure
      Message 2 of 25 , Apr 3 7:17 PM
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        Ravi, I have the Tikka that you listed, and it has worked well for me. You're not going to make a big dent in weight savings based on the cost, so I'm not sure if it would be worth it to or not. One of my objectives in looking for a headlamp was to find a bright one that used disposable batteries, and was relatively light, which for a hike like the JMT is a plus, IMO. I don't use the high setting very often, but it does come in handy for night hiking.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.
        >
        > I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.
        >
        > This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.
        >
        > I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.
        >
        > However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.
        >
        > Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.
        >
      • ravi_jmt2013
        ... I doubt that I would save more than one ounce over the lamp I have. I guess I m more worried about not having replaceable batteries but that might not be
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 3 7:41 PM
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          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ravi, I have the Tikka that you listed, and it has worked well for me. You're not going to make a big dent in weight savings based on the cost, so I'm not sure if it would be worth it to or not.

          I doubt that I would save more than one ounce over the lamp I have. I guess I'm more worried about not having replaceable batteries but that might not be such a big deal with a recharge at MTR. I like the fact that the Sprinter is extremely bright at full blast.
        • Don
          I carry a Petzl E+Lite. Weighs an ounce and uses the CR2032 batteries. I ve had mine for a couple of years and it s still on the original batteries. That is
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 3 8:27 PM
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            I carry a Petzl E+Lite. Weighs an ounce and uses the CR2032 batteries. I've had mine for a couple of years and it's still on the original batteries. That is an indication of how little I use it. If I did night hiking it would be perfectly adequate. I mainly carry it as part of my emergency kit for strobe singling, "have to hike out at night" scenarios etc. Around camp (though I'm rarely wandering around after dark) and for in tent use a Photon Freedom light serves the purpose. I could easily night hike with it too (makes me think about leaving the Petzl at home). Consider what you really need. You're not trying to illuminate the face of Half Dome. If you're doing night hiking you're better off with low illumination held at waist level aimed just far enough ahead of you to bring out the detail in the trail in something more than a one dimension washout. As a bonus, by using a lower intensity light aimed down you're less likely to experience the wrath of cranky people like me. You may tell headlamps are one of my pet peeves. Another is bear-bells and I'm grateful that subject hasn't come up yet this year.

            http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E02-P2-Emergency-Headlamp/dp/B005KKA00U

            http://www.photonlight.com/led-flashlights/photon-freedom-micro-led-keychain-flashlight/

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail....
            >
          • Barbara Karagosian
            Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list! Do they work? Barbara
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 3 8:46 PM
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              Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list!  Do they work?


              Barbara


              On Apr 3, 2013, at 8:27 PM, "Don" <amrowinc@...> wrote:

               

              I carry a Petzl E+Lite. Weighs an ounce and uses the CR2032 batteries. I've had mine for a couple of years and it's still on the original batteries. That is an indication of how little I use it. If I did night hiking it would be perfectly adequate. I mainly carry it as part of my emergency kit for strobe singling, "have to hike out at night" scenarios etc. Around camp (though I'm rarely wandering around after dark) and for in tent use a Photon Freedom light serves the purpose. I could easily night hike with it too (makes me think about leaving the Petzl at home). Consider what you really need. You're not trying to illuminate the face of Half Dome. If you're doing night hiking you're better off with low illumination held at waist level aimed just far enough ahead of you to bring out the detail in the trail in something more than a one dimension washout. As a bonus, by using a lower intensity light aimed down you're less likely to experience the wrath of cranky people like me. You may tell headlamps are one of my pet peeves. Another is bear-bells and I'm grateful that subject hasn't come up yet this year.

              http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E02-P2-Emergency-Headlamp/dp/B005KKA00U

              http://www.photonlight.com/led-flashlights/photon-freedom-micro-led-keychain-flashlight/

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail....
              >

            • Joe MacLeish
              Where do you put bear bells? From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian Sent: Wednesday, April
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 3 9:27 PM
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                Where do you put bear bells?

                 

                From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian
                Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2013 8:47 PM
                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                 

                 

                Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list!  Do they work?

                 


                Barbara

                 


                On Apr 3, 2013, at 8:27 PM, "Don" <amrowinc@...> wrote:

                 

                I carry a Petzl E+Lite. Weighs an ounce and uses the CR2032 batteries. I've had mine for a couple of years and it's still on the original batteries. That is an indication of how little I use it. If I did night hiking it would be perfectly adequate. I mainly carry it as part of my emergency kit for strobe singling, "have to hike out at night" scenarios etc. Around camp (though I'm rarely wandering around after dark) and for in tent use a Photon Freedom light serves the purpose. I could easily night hike with it too (makes me think about leaving the Petzl at home). Consider what you really need. You're not trying to illuminate the face of Half Dome. If you're doing night hiking you're better off with low illumination held at waist level aimed just far enough ahead of you to bring out the detail in the trail in something more than a one dimension washout. As a bonus, by using a lower intensity light aimed down you're less likely to experience the wrath of cranky people like me. You may tell headlamps are one of my pet peeves. Another is bear-bells and I'm grateful that subject hasn't come up yet this year.

                http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E02-P2-Emergency-Headlamp/dp/B005KKA00U

                http://www.photonlight.com/led-flashlights/photon-freedom-micro-led-keychain-flashlight/

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail....
                >

              • Don Amundson
                Only as a dinner bell for our furry friends and an irritant to us cranky types. To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com From: barbara@mkpe.com Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 3 9:30 PM
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                  Only as a dinner bell for our furry friends and an irritant to us cranky types.


                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  From: barbara@...
                  Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 20:46:52 -0700
                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                   

                  Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list!  Do they work?


                  Barbara


                  On Apr 3, 2013, at 8:27 PM, "Don" <amrowinc@...> wrote:

                  ...........Another is bear-bells and I'm grateful that subject hasn't come up yet this year.



                • Don
                  Nah, I won t say it. Care to answer Barbara? ... On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian ... Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells
                  Message 8 of 25 , Apr 3 9:40 PM
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                    Nah, I won't say it. Care to answer Barbara?

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Where do you put bear bells?

                    On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian
                    > Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2013 8:47 PM
                    Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                    > Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list! Do they work?
                    >
                    > Barbara

                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Barbara Karagosian
                    Where Don won t find them :-) On Apr 3, 2013, at 9:40 PM, Don wrote: Nah, I won t say it. Care to answer Barbara? ... On Behalf Of
                    Message 9 of 25 , Apr 3 9:44 PM
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                      Where Don won't find them :-)


                      On Apr 3, 2013, at 9:40 PM, "Don" <amrowinc@...> wrote:

                       

                      Nah, I won't say it. Care to answer Barbara?

                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Where do you put bear bells?

                      On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian
                      > Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2013 8:47 PM
                      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                      > Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list! Do they work?
                      >
                      > Barbara

                      >
                      >
                      >


                    • Don Amundson
                      Very diplomatic Barbara. To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com From: barbara@mkpe.com Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 21:44:20 -0700 Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Bear
                      Message 10 of 25 , Apr 3 10:08 PM
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                        Very diplomatic Barbara.


                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        From: barbara@...
                        Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 21:44:20 -0700
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                         

                        Where Don won't find them :-)


                        On Apr 3, 2013, at 9:40 PM, "Don" <amrowinc@...> wrote:

                         
                        Nah, I won't say it. Care to answer Barbara?

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Where do you put bear bells?

                        On Behalf Of Barbara Karagosian
                        > Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2013 8:47 PM
                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Bear bells

                        > Thanks for reminding me - I think I left them off my list! Do they work?
                        >
                        > Barbara

                        >
                        >
                        >




                      • Chris
                        Hi Ravi: I am trying to go lightweight, so I m using this little 1 ounce LED flashlight. It comes with two interchangeable attachments: a carabiner (shown in
                        Message 11 of 25 , Apr 3 10:46 PM
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                          Hi Ravi:

                          I am trying to go lightweight, so I'm using this little 1 ounce LED flashlight. It comes with two interchangeable attachments: a carabiner (shown in the picture), and a hat clip (so you can use it like a headlamp).

                          http://www.amazon.com/New-Princeton-IMPULSE-White-IMP-1-PK/dp/B007LL551U/

                          Chris.

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Ravi, I have the Tikka that you listed, and it has worked well for me. You're not going to make a big dent in weight savings based on the cost, so I'm not sure if it would be worth it to or not. One of my objectives in looking for a headlamp was to find a bright one that used disposable batteries, and was relatively light, which for a hike like the JMT is a plus, IMO. I don't use the high setting very often, but it does come in handy for night hiking.
                          >
                          > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.
                          > >
                          > > I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.
                          > >
                          > > This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.
                          > >
                          > > I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.
                          > >
                          > > However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.
                          > >
                          > > Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.
                          > >
                          >
                        • Mike Mosack
                          Hi Ravi, I have quite a few headlamps, but have found my favorite so far and did a test report on it (link below). It is a Princeton Tec Spectrum Fuel which is
                          Message 12 of 25 , Apr 3 11:39 PM
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                            Hi Ravi,
                            I have quite a few headlamps, but have found my favorite so far and did a test report on it (link below). It is a Princeton Tec Spectrum Fuel which is 70 lumens (crazy bright), adjustable intensity and completely customizable. (Made to order) I hope this helps... I use it all the time for work and play...
                            Mike
                             
                            Sent: Wednesday, April 03, 2013 6:59 PM
                            Subject: [John Muir Trail] Headlamps
                             
                             

                            I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.

                            I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.

                            This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.

                            I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.

                            However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.

                            Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.

                          • Mina Loomis
                            I put myself squarely in the UL camp, and based on personal experience that little light is inadequate. While it should be fine if everything goes according
                            Message 13 of 25 , Apr 4 6:13 AM
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                              I put myself squarely in the UL camp, and based on personal experience that little light is inadequate.  While it should be fine if everything goes according to plan, sometimes things *don't* go according to plan!  Once I found myself trying to negotiate the dark woods in the middle of the night (2011 JMT trip--long story) with just a Photon Freedom (similar to the little Impulse)--beyond frustrating!  And more recently (Big Bend) we found ourselves hiking past dark with Petzl E-lites which was barely adequate.  The trail was on a hillside where an accident from a misstep was a real possibility, and we were just lucky to spot the only flat place to stop.  In the future I plan to take something enough larger to be brighter, not because I'll need the brightness regularly but because if I do need the brightness, I might *really* need it!

                              Mina

                              On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:46 AM, Chris <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                               

                              Hi Ravi:

                              I am trying to go lightweight, so I'm using this little 1 ounce LED flashlight. It comes with two interchangeable attachments: a carabiner (shown in the picture), and a hat clip (so you can use it like a headlamp).

                              http://www.amazon.com/New-Princeton-IMPULSE-White-IMP-1-PK/dp/B007LL551U/

                              Chris.


                            • Chris Pratt
                              My vote is for a Petzl Tikka headlamp. Very strong and uses three AAA batteries. Has three different brightness settings and a flash mode for emergencies.
                              Message 14 of 25 , Apr 4 6:56 AM
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                                My vote is for a Petzl Tikka headlamp.  Very strong and uses three AAA batteries.  Has three different brightness settings and a flash mode for emergencies.  This makes it very easy to get batteries for while on the trail.  Great handsfree operation for reading/writing at night and those late night trips into the woods. 

                                I actually end up use it more at home, greatest thing in the world for working on a car with.

                                Chris
                                On 4/4/2013 8:13 AM, Mina Loomis wrote:
                                 

                                I put myself squarely in the UL camp, and based on personal experience that little light is inadequate.  While it should be fine if everything goes according to plan, sometimes things *don't* go according to plan!  Once I found myself trying to negotiate the dark woods in the middle of the night (2011 JMT trip--long story) with just a Photon Freedom (similar to the little Impulse)--beyond frustrating!  And more recently (Big Bend) we found ourselves hiking past dark with Petzl E-lites which was barely adequate.  The trail was on a hillside where an accident from a misstep was a real possibility, and we were just lucky to spot the only flat place to stop.  In the future I plan to take something enough larger to be brighter, not because I'll need the brightness regularly but because if I do need the brightness, I might *really* need it!


                                Mina

                                On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:46 AM, Chris <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                                 

                                Hi Ravi:

                                I am trying to go lightweight, so I'm using this little 1 ounce LED flashlight. It comes with two interchangeable attachments: a carabiner (shown in the picture), and a hat clip (so you can use it like a headlamp).

                                http://www.amazon.com/New-Princeton-IMPULSE-White-IMP-1-PK/dp/B007LL551U/

                                Chris.



                              • Barbara Karagosian
                                Anyone use Zebralites, or Fenix? Barbara
                                Message 15 of 25 , Apr 4 7:33 AM
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                                  Anyone use Zebralites, or Fenix?

                                  Barbara


                                  On Apr 4, 2013, at 6:56 AM, Chris Pratt <chris.pratt89@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  My vote is for a Petzl Tikka headlamp.  Very strong and uses three AAA batteries.  Has three different brightness settings and a flash mode for emergencies.  This makes it very easy to get batteries for while on the trail.  Great handsfree operation for reading/writing at night and those late night trips into the woods. 

                                  I actually end up use it more at home, greatest thing in the world for working on a car with.

                                  Chris

                                  On 4/4/2013 8:13 AM, Mina Loomis wrote:
                                   

                                  I put myself squarely in the UL camp, and based on personal experience that little light is inadequate.  While it should be fine if everything goes according to plan, sometimes things *don't* go according to plan!  Once I found myself trying to negotiate the dark woods in the middle of the night (2011 JMT trip--long story) with just a Photon Freedom (similar to the little Impulse)--beyond frustrating!  And more recently (Big Bend) we found ourselves hiking past dark with Petzl E-lites which was barely adequate.  The trail was on a hillside where an accident from a misstep was a real possibility, and we were just lucky to spot the only flat place to stop.  In the future I plan to take something enough larger to be brighter, not because I'll need the brightness regularly but because if I do need the brightness, I might *really* need it!


                                  Mina

                                  On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:46 AM, Chris <cehauser1@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  Hi Ravi:

                                  I am trying to go lightweight, so I'm using this little 1 ounce LED flashlight. It comes with two interchangeable attachments: a carabiner (shown in the picture), and a hat clip (so you can use it like a headlamp).

                                  http://www.amazon.com/New-Princeton-IMPULSE-White-IMP-1-PK/dp/B007LL551U/

                                  Chris.



                                • staehpj1
                                  Personally I have taken to leaving the headlamp home in favor of a little (0.2 oz) zipper pull light (eGear Pico). I found that I use my light so little that
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Apr 4 7:55 AM
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                                    Personally I have taken to leaving the headlamp home in favor of a little (0.2 oz) zipper pull light (eGear Pico). I found that I use my light so little that I almost stopped carrying one altogether. The Pico was the compromise. It's 15 hour battery life lasts me a very long time since I tend to use it for 10-15 seconds at a time and not all that often at that.

                                    When I did use a headlamp, I liked the Petzl Tikka pretty well. Sometimes I use it for night time trail running, but for that I have found I prefer a hand held light. Even for night time trail running, I run without a light a lot of the time, as long as it is not pitch black.
                                  • John Ladd
                                    There are lots of good headlamps out there. I ll just mention two features that are available only on a minority of lamps but I find quite useful 1) A red
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Apr 4 8:47 AM
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                                      There are lots of good headlamps out there. I'll just mention two features that are available only on a minority of lamps but I find quite useful

                                      1) A red light option is very good when you want to preserve your light vision (for stargazing or starlight hiking) but need some light to find something or look at a map or whatever. Some lamps have red LEDs and others have a red lens that can cover the white LEDs

                                      2) A lock function can save your batteries. The most common cause fo battery burnout is when you lamp inadvertently is switched on in you pack and burns all day long until you unpack the next night. Some lamps have a means of locking the on/off switch in the off position so that it can't easily be re-activated (often the lock works by holding the on/off switch in for several seconds)

                                      High-intensity, low-intensity and strobe functions are also nice and more common.

                                      You might consider a super-UL light (e.g., one that uses a watch battery) as a spare light in addition to your main light. It adds almost no weight, it's a backup in case of failure of the main lamp or exhausting the batteries, and if you place it somewhere you can always find it like in a sleeping bag pocket, you can use it to find your main headlamp if you (as I once did) forget to put it on your head before it gets full dark and end up needing a flashilght to find your flashlight.

                                      John Curran Ladd
                                      1616 Castro Street
                                      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                      415-648-9279


                                      On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 6:59 PM, ravi_jmt2013 <ravi@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.

                                      I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.

                                      This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.

                                      I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.

                                      However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.

                                      Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.


                                    • ravi_jmt2013
                                      Thanks for all the information on lamps - great help as usual. I decided to test out my Black Diamond sprinter by fully charging it and leaving it on the
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Apr 4 9:08 AM
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                                        Thanks for all the information on lamps - great help as usual. I decided to test out my Black Diamond sprinter by fully charging it and leaving it on the lowest power setting to see how many hours it lasts. If it is anything like advertised, I can't imagine even needing to recharge it at MTR although I will send my charger there in case.

                                        I will plan to carry one of those keychain lights as a backup.
                                      • knaushouse
                                        Another headlamp to consider is the Mammut S-Flex. Lighter than others (48 g/1.7 oz incl single AA battery), two levels of lighting, steady and blinking
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Apr 4 9:32 AM
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                                          Another headlamp to consider is the Mammut S-Flex.

                                          Lighter than others (48 g/1.7 oz incl single AA battery), two levels of lighting, steady and blinking (emergency) red light. Lower output (lumens) than other models but more than adequate for futzing around camp, changing clothes and nocturnal manouvers. OK for trail walking. In deference to Springsteen and Manfred Mann, I prefer not to be "Blinded by the Light" when in the wild. Bottom line, I've used this for a few years and am pleased; a good weight vs. performance trade-off. ~$30.

                                          These are not widely available. I bought mine at a small shop in the Kings Beach/Tahoe area, but they are also available online at both REI and Mammut's site.

                                          http://www.mammut.ch/en/productOverview/products_headlamps_usa/Headlamps.html

                                          Good luck!

                                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.
                                          >
                                          > I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces.
                                        • A. Hintz
                                          I would go with a Black Diamond headlamp.  I have the Storm, a little heavier than some, but near unbreakable, with great options for adjusting your burn
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Apr 4 9:33 AM
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                                            I would go with a Black Diamond headlamp.  I have the Storm, a little heavier than some, but near unbreakable, with great options for adjusting your burn time, and it is also water proof up to 5 meters.  I think I paid $50 for mine, but most of the Black Diamond headlamps are very solid IMO.

                                            Andy


                                            From: ravi_jmt2013 <ravi@...>
                                            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Wednesday, April 3, 2013 6:59 PM
                                            Subject: [John Muir Trail] Headlamps

                                             
                                            I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.

                                            I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.

                                            This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.

                                            I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.

                                            However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.

                                            Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.



                                          • Ray Rippel
                                            Good evening, John, I might add a third: 3) Made of plastic, metal, carbon fiber--whatever--that is a light color, so you can find the darned thing in the
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Apr 4 10:57 PM
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                                              Good evening, John,

                                              I might add a third:

                                              3) Made of plastic, metal, carbon fiber--whatever--that is a light color, so you can find the darned thing in the dark! Failing that, a small strip of luminous tape can be a real help.

                                              Good hiking, Ray


                                              On Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 5:47 AM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              There are lots of good headlamps out there. I'll just mention two features that are available only on a minority of lamps but I find quite useful

                                              1) A red light option is very good when you want to preserve your light vision (for stargazing or starlight hiking) but need some light to find something or look at a map or whatever. Some lamps have red LEDs and others have a red lens that can cover the white LEDs

                                              2) A lock function can save your batteries. The most common cause fo battery burnout is when you lamp inadvertently is switched on in you pack and burns all day long until you unpack the next night. Some lamps have a means of locking the on/off switch in the off position so that it can't easily be re-activated (often the lock works by holding the on/off switch in for several seconds)

                                              High-intensity, low-intensity and strobe functions are also nice and more common.

                                              You might consider a super-UL light (e.g., one that uses a watch battery) as a spare light in addition to your main light. It adds almost no weight, it's a backup in case of failure of the main lamp or exhausting the batteries, and if you place it somewhere you can always find it like in a sleeping bag pocket, you can use it to find your main headlamp if you (as I once did) forget to put it on your head before it gets full dark and end up needing a flashilght to find your flashlight.

                                              John Curran Ladd
                                              1616 Castro Street
                                              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                              415-648-9279


                                              On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 6:59 PM, ravi_jmt2013 <ravi@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.

                                              I have a Black Diamond Sprinter (75 lumens) which weighs in at 3.9 ounces. I purchased it for nighttime running in urban environments and it has a rear red strobe light for visibility (can be shut off) which adds weight and obviously isn't needed on trails.

                                              This isn't perfect but I would most likely take this lamp rather than buying another one except for the fact that it has an integrated rechargeable battery pack and uses a proprietary charger. Advertised burn time is 6 hours on high and 42 hours on the lowest setting.

                                              I do not plan on any night hiking other than ascending Mt. Whitney so the lamp would be used mainly in camp at moderate power or in my tent for reading at low power. I could send myself the recharger in my MTR resupply and get a full charge since I'm staying there overnight. I'm already sending another charger to MTR for my camera batteries which I'll ship back home so I won't have to carry it on the rest of the trip. So I could do the same for this lamp.

                                              However, it may be safer to go with a lamp that uses disposable batteries instead and weighs somewhat less. I've seen good reviews for this one (http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-E99-Tikka-Headlamp-Graphite/dp/B0027GXC96) but it is more than I'd ideally like to spend.

                                              Any input on this would be great, especially any recommendations for less expensive headlamps using disposable batteries. Thanks.



                                            • speedcenter2001
                                              For the JMT I have two kinds of lights - one for occasional use, or one for daily use while walking (fall/winter): One for minimal use in summer, made by
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Apr 5 1:20 PM
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                                                For the JMT I have two kinds of lights - one for occasional use, or one for daily use while walking (fall/winter):

                                                One for minimal use in summer, made by Rayovac years ago (i.e. I haven't seen it for sale lately). It uses just one AA alkaline or lithium and runs long enough for an entire hike. Yery light (2 ounces), reasonably usable when you need to walk in the dark, but long term, I would not want to rely on this to illuminate a trail in front of me.

                                                I also have a PrincetonTec Remix light - disappointed in it. The $12 Rayovac is a much better light.

                                                For fall or winter, when you can expect to need light frequently to actually move on the trail, I prefer a lamp with significantly more light output, such as the Fenix HP11. Great compromise in weight and output. 6 ounces, 277 lumen peak - cavers use this kind of light, but it isn't as heavy as the LED lights made for bicycles.

                                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.
                                                >
                                              • Mina Loomis
                                                One more thing: According to the eye doctors, as we age our eyes gather light less well, and we need brighter and brighter lights to see well. So older
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Apr 5 3:21 PM
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                                                  One more thing:  According to the eye doctors, as we age our eyes gather light less well, and we need brighter and brighter lights to see well.  So older hikers may need a brighter headlamp, especially for critical functions like an unanticipated but necessary night hike.

                                                  Mina

                                                  On Apr 5, 2013, at 3:20 PM, pburke@... wrote:

                                                   


                                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > I'm curious to know the type/model of headlamps people are using on the John Muir Trail.
                                                  >

                                                  _
                                                • Tim Goodrich
                                                  John, Another trick to prevent your headlamp from inadvertently turning on when not using it, esp. if it lacks the lock function, is to reverse the polarity
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Apr 7 9:23 PM
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                                                    John,

                                                    Another trick to prevent your headlamp from inadvertently turning on when not using it, esp. if it lacks the “lock” function, is to reverse the polarity of the batteries. Then, when you’re ready to use it again, flip the batteries around and you’re good to go!

                                                     

                                                    Tim

                                                  • Roleigh Martin
                                                    Tim, others, be cautious about doing this: http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=312913 Yes. Charging with polarity reversed can cause a reversal in
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Apr 7 9:51 PM
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                                                      Tim, others, be cautious about doing this:


                                                      Yes. Charging with polarity reversed can cause a reversal in battery polarity causing gas pressure inside the battery to rise, which can activate the safety vent, lead to alkaline electrolyte leakage, rapid deterioration in battery performance, battery swelling or battery rupture.

                                                      This may be more a problem when two batteries are involved (this example involved such).  I tried to remember if I had a battery deteriorate or a device failed by doing such.  Do others know more about this?


                                                      -------------------------------------------------
                                                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                                                      _



                                                      On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 12:23 AM, Tim Goodrich <tim@...> wrote:
                                                       

                                                      John,

                                                      Another trick to prevent your headlamp from inadvertently turning on when not using it, esp. if it lacks the “lock” function, is to reverse the polarity of the batteries. Then, when you’re ready to use it again, flip the batteries around and you’re good to go!

                                                       

                                                      Tim


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