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Re: how many hour walking each day

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  • francisco ramiro
    Thanks to you all for your replies, they are very insightful. This has made me think of other variables I hadn t in mind to rethink my itinerary, training
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 26, 2013
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      Thanks to you all for your replies, they are very insightful. This has made me think of other variables I hadn't in mind to rethink my itinerary, training efforts and protection from injuries.

      Maybe I'll have to be slower. Still want to do keep the pace but it seems that it'll be best to do some testing.

      Again, thank you.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Gail" <forgetwho@...> wrote:
      >
      > The best way I know to estimate this is to take long day hikes with a 30-pound pack on trails that have approximately the same rate of elevation gain as the days you are planning in the Sierra. For me, at the age of 69 (70 in June :-), I know that I walk an 18 min. mile on a city sidewalk, a 36 min. mile on a flat trail, and a 45 min. mile on a trail with moderate gain.
      >
      > I'm not dealing in my training hikes here with high altitude, though. My memory of the one time I climbed Whitney - in 1980 - is that I took one resting breath for each two steps - even though I was well acclimated by the time I got to Whitney (I'd gone in over Kearsarge and Forester Passes, not up from Whitney Portal). For the highest elevations I'll probably allow at least an hour per mile.
      >
      > Anyway, these are some of the variables - "city" walking speed vs. steepness of the trail, pack weight, elevation gain, altitude - to consider. (Also your endurance - that's why the day hikes should be long.) You can easily time yourself by practicing on trails of known distance and elevation gain with a pack. (I like to pack my pack for dayhikes with the actual stuff I'll be taking on my trip, or most of it, not just equivalent weight, because I want to see what the load feels like distributed that way.)
      >
      > But this is not a science. I'm much slower in the heat than not, and it's going to be hotter on my trip than it is for me in training. The trail will be much rockier above the tree line in the Sierra than it is for me here in training. And then there will be stream crossings...etc. So be conservative in your estimate.
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I suggest you plan for 1.5 mph until you learn that you can go faster.
      > >
      > > I find I go about 2 mph on flats and downhills with the actual degree of
      > > slope not making much difference. (Really steep trails slow me down, but
      > > the JMT is rarely that steep). On upslopes, I climb about 600 feet per
      > > hour, which works out to a bit better than 1 mph.
      > >
      > > Of course, lots of people are faster. Hiking too fast per hour, however,
      > > can lead to lower miles per day, because it is harder to maintain the speed.
      > >
      > > I also agree that a sustained pace of 3 mph on the flat without a pack
      > > probably implies about 1.5 mph in the Sierra with a pack.
      > >
      > > John Curran Ladd
      > > 1616 Castro Street
      > > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
      > > 415-648-9279
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 at 5:46 PM, francisco ramiro <fcoinfante@>wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hello,
      > > >
      > > > I want to finish the trail in 16 days so the daily target is to walk at
      > > > least 15 miles .
      > > > From your experience, how many hours will it take to do a walk for about
      > > > 15 miles everyday?I want to preparemy self for it.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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