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iPod Touch Update

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  • Darryl
    Here are some new developments on my iPod Touch research. There is a Kindle app available for the iPod touch/iPhone (not very highly rated) so theoretically I
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 13 8:49 PM
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      Here are some new developments on my iPod Touch research. There is a Kindle app available for the iPod touch/iPhone (not very highly rated) so theoretically I could download Elizabeth Wenk's book and refer to it on the iPod Touch for navigation. Ray Rippel's JMT book is published as a PDF so I'd be interested to see how that displays on the iPod Touch. Unfortunately Erik the Black does not publish his JMT map book in digital form so that is not an option.
      Some of John Muir's books are published for free on Kindle, which if it was legible on the iPod Touch, could provide recreational reading on the trail.
      Of course, if I break my reading glasses, I may be in trouble, but that would be the case even without an iPod Touch.
      The current version of the iPod Touch can store up to 40 hours of audio, although the video display for reading may consume a lot more energy. In order to power the iPod Touch throughout the trip, this solar panel has good reviews. Note it has no internal battery storage: http://www.amazon.com/sCharger-5-Performance-Sunlight-Extremely-Reliable/dp/B003ZFQUWO/
      Just thoughts at this stage....
      Darryl
    • Darryl
      Note:The solar panel weighs 8oz.
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 13 8:53 PM
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        Note:The solar panel weighs 8oz.
      • Chris
        Darryl, You may want to consider an external battery pack rather than a solar charger. I would imagine the solar charger would take a fair amount of time to
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 13 10:28 PM
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          Darryl,
          You may want to consider an external battery pack rather than a solar charger. I would imagine the solar charger would take a fair amount of time to charge your Touch and I do not know how well it would work strapped to the outside of your pack. With a battery pack at least you know what you are getting. The New Trent NT5200 weights just 5.3oz and will have enough juice to recharge your Touch at least 3 times. There are others out there that are a case and charger in one - check them out.

          Chris

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Darryl" <dabrahms@...> wrote:
          >
          > Note:The solar panel weighs 8oz.
          >
        • J LaRocque
          Last year I carried an iPhone kept in airplane mode, so it was basically an iPod Touch. I used it as my camera, GPS, notepad, for guide books, music player,
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 14 7:00 AM
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            Last year I carried an iPhone kept in airplane mode, so it was
            basically an iPod Touch. I used it as my camera, GPS, notepad, for
            guide books, music player, and as a phone once or twice. It also
            linked with my Spot Connect to send out nightly messages of my
            progress.

            I kept both Ray's and Elizabeth's books in Apple's iBook app and
            referred to them often.

            I carried paper maps but also use the John Muir Trail Map App (which
            is just the digital form of John Harrison's maps) and the National
            Geographic National Park Maps App, which saved my butt when the kid
            and i had to exit to Kings Canyon and it was the only map I had of the
            area. Note, the iPod Touch doesn't have a built in GPS so it may not
            be as useful in this respect.

            Keeping it charged was kind of a chore, but the Goal Zero Nomad 3.5
            with battery pack worked. This year I'm dumping it in favor of the
            TekCharge MP1580 battery pack with Energizer Ultimate Lithium
            batteries (the battery pack weighs 1.6 oz and four batteries weigh 2
            oz). On a set of four batteries I get about 2 1/2 charges. So for less
            weight than my previous setup I can charge up to 15 times (way more
            then I need, I got about two days out of a full charge with my usage).
            Plus I can send half the batteries to my MTR resupply. I know not the
            most environmentally friendly or cheapest, but it works.
          • Roleigh Martin
            PDF books display horribly on tablets or smartphones or the Ipod Touch. I begged Ray to come out with a Kindle book. I don t know why he did not. PDF books
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 14 7:34 AM
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              PDF books display horribly on tablets or smartphones or the Ipod Touch.  I begged Ray to come out with a Kindle book.  I don't know why he did not.  PDF books are best read on very large screen monitors, like 20" or larger.  Now if one has 20/10 vision, then perhaps smaller screens are suitable to read PDF books on.
              -------------------------------------------------
              Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
              _


            • charliepolecat
              Oh dear. Do we Luddites have to remind everyone again how much joy an actual book with actual paper pages can be?
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 14 7:46 AM
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                Oh dear. Do we Luddites have to remind everyone again how much joy an actual book with actual paper pages can be?



                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                >
                > PDF books display horribly on tablets or smartphones or the Ipod Touch. I
                > begged Ray to come out with a Kindle book. I don't know why he did not.
                > PDF books are best read on very large screen monitors, like 20" or larger.
                > Now if one has 20/10 vision, then perhaps smaller screens are suitable to
                > read PDF books on.
                >
              • ravi_jmt2013
                ... I used to feel that way until I purchased the retina version full size iPad a year ago. Except for library books, I now do almost all of my reading on
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 14 8:06 AM
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                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "charliepolecat" <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Oh dear. Do we Luddites have to remind everyone again how much joy an actual book with actual paper pages can be?
                  >

                  I used to feel that way until I purchased the retina version full size iPad a year ago. Except for library books, I now do almost all of my reading on the iPad including PDF files, newspapers, magazines, etc. I was surprised that eye strain is reduced vs. paper. When I mentioned this to my eye doctor, he said that many of his patients feel the same way.

                  Of course, the iPad is way too heavy to carry on the trail and requires a long time to charge even on a regular household outlet... and I have never found reading on the iPod touch feasible except for short newspaper articles. If the iPad mini could get down to 8 ounces or so, I could see it serving as a compelling substitute for Kindle on the trail but of course it would require recharging much more often.
                • charliepolecat
                  Not to mention that in an emergency, the paperback book can make a nice fire starter. How many fires can you get out of the electronic thingies?
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 14 8:15 AM
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                    Not to mention that in an emergency, the paperback book can make a nice fire starter. How many fires can you get out of the electronic thingies?



                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "charliepolecat" <kennethjessett@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Oh dear. Do we Luddites have to remind everyone again how much joy an actual book with actual paper pages can be?
                    > >
                    >
                    > I used to feel that way until I purchased the retina version full size iPad a year ago. Except for library books, I now do almost all of my reading on the iPad including PDF files, newspapers, magazines, etc. I was surprised that eye strain is reduced vs. paper. When I mentioned this to my eye doctor, he said that many of his patients feel the same way.
                    >
                    > Of course, the iPad is way too heavy to carry on the trail and requires a long time to charge even on a regular household outlet... and I have never found reading on the iPod touch feasible except for short newspaper articles. If the iPad mini could get down to 8 ounces or so, I could see it serving as a compelling substitute for Kindle on the trail but of course it would require recharging much more often.
                    >
                  • Ray Rippel
                    Good morning, everyone, I don t want to get into a back-and-forth, but I think PDF books display horribly on tablets needs a response. Here are a few facts:
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 14 8:38 AM
                    Good morning, everyone,

                    I don't want to get into a back-and-forth, but I think "PDF books display horribly on tablets" needs a response. Here are a few facts:

                       - Planning Your Thru-Hike on the John Muir Trail was designed to look best on the iPad and uses every pixel of that device. I was shooting for a bit more than "horrible."

                       - The text size on the iPad is about the size you'll find in a printed book, and MUCH BIGGER than you will find in a typical printed magazine, even with the entire page displayed on the iPad. I don't think every book and magazine published before the age of computers looked "horrible" because I had to put my glasses on to read them.

                       - To illustrate that point, take a look at the two photos, attached. The first is from Ms. Wenk's fine book. The second is from my small effort. If you size the photos the same, you'll see that the text size is practically identical. If you can read her book without glasses, you can read mine. If you need glasses for hers, you will for mine.

                       - Most of us have probably seen a National Geographic magazine. Take a look at the text size; it's much smaller than you'll find in Planning Your Thru-Hike on the John Muir Trail. It is also graphically rich--it isn't just a block of text followed by a photo followed by more text, etc. In the magazine, colors, varying text size, placement of the photos on the page--everything is carefully selected and placed to add to the experience. That was the intent of my book, from the beginning. I wanted to take advantage of the iPad's gorgeous display to produce something beautiful.

                       - Just to be clear (and to paraphrase Mr. Bentson to Mr. Quayle): I've read National Geographic magazine, I know National Geographic magazine. My book's no National Geographic magazine!

                    I have nothing against Kindles; I have a Kindle app for my iPad and often read on it. That said, the Kindle file formats do not allow for any but the most basic of graphic design. That's why there is iBooks, Zinio, Adobe DPS and other formats out there to take full advantage of the iPad.

                    Good hiking, Ray

                    Ray Rippel

                    Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

                    http://jmtbook.com/

                    Follow me at: www.twitter.com/JMTBook



                    On Thu, Mar 14, 2013 at 4:34 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                     

                    PDF books display horribly on tablets or smartphones or the Ipod Touch.  I begged Ray to come out with a Kindle book.  I don't know why he did not.  PDF books are best read on very large screen monitors, like 20" or larger.  Now if one has 20/10 vision, then perhaps smaller screens are suitable to read PDF books on.


                  • Roleigh Martin
                    I explained this to Ray last year. I am 63 years old. I am not alone when I say this. There is a huge market for large size font books and to a large
                    Message 10 of 16 , Mar 14 8:50 AM
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                      I explained this to Ray last year.  I am 63 years old.  I am not alone when I say this.  There is a huge market for large size font books and to a large degree, the Kindle has removed the need to produce and buy large size font books.  With the Kindle, one can set the font size to be whatever is comfortable for one's eyes.  

                      A younger person with good vision can read Ray's book just fine with an Ipad (but not an Ipod Touch!).  An older person whose eyes are not as good anymore will not find reading Ray's book or any PDF book comfortable on an Ipad, because when you enlarge the font in a PDF, the page all of a sudden becomes larger than the screen size and you have to scroll the page around to read the page -- it is a super headache.  

                      With the Kindle, when you enlarge the font size, the page size stays equal to the screen size, fewer words appear on a given page, but nobody has to scroll the page around to read the page.  It is very easy and it works on Smartphones and Ipod Touches just great.
                      -------------------------------------------------
                      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
                      _



                      On Thu, Mar 14, 2013 at 11:38 AM, Ray Rippel <ray.rippel@...> wrote:
                       
                      [Attachment(s) from Ray Rippel included below]

                      Good morning, everyone,

                      I don't want to get into a back-and-forth, but I think "PDF books display horribly on tablets" needs a response. Here are a few facts:

                         - Planning Your Thru-Hike on the John Muir Trail was designed to look best on the iPad and uses every pixel of that device. I was shooting for a bit more than "horrible."

                         - The text size on the iPad is about the size you'll find in a printed book, and MUCH BIGGER than you will find in a typical printed magazine, even with the entire page displayed on the iPad. I don't think every book and magazine published before the age of computers looked "horrible" because I had to put my glasses on to read them.

                         - To illustrate that point, take a look at the two photos, attached. The first is from Ms. Wenk's fine book. The second is from my small effort. If you size the photos the same, you'll see that the text size is practically identical. If you can read her book without glasses, you can read mine. If you need glasses for hers, you will for mine.

                         - Most of us have probably seen a National Geographic magazine. Take a look at the text size; it's much smaller than you'll find in Planning Your Thru-Hike on the John Muir Trail. It is also graphically rich--it isn't just a block of text followed by a photo followed by more text, etc. In the magazine, colors, varying text size, placement of the photos on the page--everything is carefully selected and placed to add to the experience. That was the intent of my book, from the beginning. I wanted to take advantage of the iPad's gorgeous display to produce something beautiful.

                         - Just to be clear (and to paraphrase Mr. Bentson to Mr. Quayle): I've read National Geographic magazine, I know National Geographic magazine. My book's no National Geographic magazine!

                      I have nothing against Kindles; I have a Kindle app for my iPad and often read on it. That said, the Kindle file formats do not allow for any but the most basic of graphic design. That's why there is iBooks, Zinio, Adobe DPS and other formats out there to take full advantage of the iPad.

                      Good hiking, Ray

                      Ray Rippel

                      Author, Planning Your Thru-Hike of the John Muir Trail

                      http://jmtbook.com/

                      Follow me at: www.twitter.com/JMTBook



                      On Thu, Mar 14, 2013 at 4:34 AM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                       

                      PDF books display horribly on tablets or smartphones or the Ipod Touch.  I begged Ray to come out with a Kindle book.  I don't know why he did not.  PDF books are best read on very large screen monitors, like 20" or larger.  Now if one has 20/10 vision, then perhaps smaller screens are suitable to read PDF books on.



                    • Darryl
                      Roleigh, Thanks for sticking up for us older hikers who need reading glasses to get by. Darryl
                      Message 11 of 16 , Mar 14 3:35 PM
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                        Roleigh,
                        Thanks for sticking up for us older hikers who need reading glasses to get by.
                        Darryl

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:>
                        > With the Kindle, when you enlarge the font size, the page size stays equal
                        > to the screen size, fewer words appear on a given page, but nobody has to
                        > scroll the page around to read the page. It is very easy and it works on
                        > Smartphones and Ipod Touches just great.
                      • sanfran_rwood
                        ... Probably quite a few. http://www.backpacker.com/start_a_fire_with_your_cellphone/videos/82 (Note that many modern gizmos make it quite tough to get the
                        Message 12 of 16 , Mar 14 6:20 PM
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                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "charliepolecat" <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
                          > Not to mention that in an emergency, the paperback book can make a nice
                          > fire starter. How many fires can you get out of the electronic thingies?

                          Probably quite a few.
                          http://www.backpacker.com/start_a_fire_with_your_cellphone/videos/82

                          (Note that many modern gizmos make it quite tough to get the battery out, though.)
                          --
                          Richard
                        • zoey_leb
                          Have you considered a regular Kindle? I got one a couple years ago for the trail, and it was great. I had Wenk s book plus plenty of other reading material. I
                          Message 13 of 16 , Mar 14 6:58 PM
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                            Have you considered a regular Kindle? I got one a couple years ago for the trail, and it was great. I had Wenk's book plus plenty of other reading material. I was originally considering taking my Touch, but didn't want to be stressed daily with recharging.

                            I just upgraded for this year's hiking to the Kindle Paperwhite, 7.5 ounces, backlit, and right now I'm testing to see if the promise of 8 weeks of battery life is true. There's another Kindle that's lighter, 5.98 ounces, but it's not backlit and has 4 weeks of battery.
                          • Joe MacLeish
                            Is this Kindle color. Can it do a color bird book or plant book? Joe From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                            Message 14 of 16 , Mar 14 7:25 PM
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                              Is this Kindle color.  Can it do a color bird book or plant book?

                              Joe

                               

                              From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of zoey_leb
                              Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2013 6:59 PM
                              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: iPod Touch Update

                               

                               



                              Have you considered a regular Kindle? I got one a couple years ago for the trail, and it was great. I had Wenk's book plus plenty of other reading material. I was originally considering taking my Touch, but didn't want to be stressed daily with recharging.

                              I just upgraded for this year's hiking to the Kindle Paperwhite, 7.5 ounces, backlit, and right now I'm testing to see if the promise of 8 weeks of battery life is true. There's another Kindle that's lighter, 5.98 ounces, but it's not backlit and has 4 weeks of battery.

                            • Don
                              Well, lets look at this from a different perspective. I m 68 years old and am not alone when I say this. I read PDF books/docs on my Iphone and Ipad just fine.
                              Message 15 of 16 , Mar 14 9:46 PM
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                                Well, lets look at this from a different perspective. I'm 68 years old and am not alone when I say this. I read PDF books/docs on my Iphone and Ipad just fine. Frankly I find enlarged text a pain, particularly on an Iphone when you end up with very little text per time flipping pages. Books aren't ideal on an Iphone in general but one deals with some inconvenience in trade for the convenience of all the device offers.
                                Ray's book is well... Ray's book. He published it in the format he wanted and apparently with more than a little research. Why that would confound anyone is beyond me.
                              • zoey_leb
                                No, it s not color, they are much heavier and don t have the battery life. The 8 weeks of life assumes 30 minutes a day, the best color would be 3 weeks and
                                Message 16 of 16 , Mar 14 11:01 PM
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                                  No, it's not color, they are much heavier and don't have the battery life. The 8 weeks of life assumes 30 minutes a day, the best color would be 3 weeks and 13.9 oz.

                                  But one of the earlier bird guide authors (I don't remember who) thought you would be a better birder with black and white art--he thought the color interfered with identification.
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