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RE: [John Muir Trail] Masters thesis & the Annapurna - would love your input!

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  • robert shattuck
    . . . and listen to the stories of all actors involved. Just watch out for young guys, smoking around shiny crates of dynamite . . . that about blew my mind.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 12, 2013
      ". . . and listen to the stories of all actors involved." 

      Just watch out for young guys, smoking around shiny crates of dynamite . . . that about blew my mind. 

      I did the Manaslu circuit in 2008, which loops around and joins the Annapurna . . . it was obvious how much more developed and clean the Annapurna circuit was, even with the road having not reached its way into most places . . . . it's going to change the economy with all those tour buses and just imagine the line there's gonna be to get up Everest. 


      BOB
      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480





    • scriv.ener
      Hello, Seigi, Perhaps you can gain some of the insight you seek from a study of the development of the Hetcb Hetchy water and power system here just north of
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 13, 2013
        Hello, Seigi,

        Perhaps you can gain some of the insight you seek from a study of the development of the Hetcb Hetchy water and power system here just north of Yosemite Valley. The City of San Francisco succeeded in the early 20th Century in daming a valley much like Yosemite and now there are calls to "undo" that work. The indigenous human population was by tben all but gone but the environmental changes were profound. The politics are often described as "John Muir's last battle."

        There are similar stories about the battle to push a highway through remote Big Sur about 200 miles south of San Francisco. The local population, including nationally known artists, poets and writers, were not truly indigenous but had chosen their isolation. Today that coastal access is both reviled and revered.

        ~Jeffrey


        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "segstak" wrote:
        >
        > Hello all!
        >
        > Quick background story:
        > My name is Seigi. Born and raised in California. I hiked the JMT last summer, and this website was an invaluable resource in helping me complete the trip. Phenomenal experience. Thank you all so much :)
        >
        > Now:
        > I'm currently studying for a masters in international studies (within the environmental sciences department) at the University of Tokyo, in Japan. I'm still in the works of figuring out a masters thesis, and I've been looking for something that combines my academic interests (resource politics, infrastructure development, water conservation, and more.. but you get the idea) with one of my passions (such as backpacking). So far, what I've come up with is the following project: to study the impact of infrastructure development on the local population along the Annapurna Circuit, in Nepal. I would choose two target villages, one with no roads (yet) and one with, and live in each for maybe a month at a time. I have a feeling that much of the opposition to the development is from a first-world perspective, that represents a 'lets-preserve-the-exotic-culture' attitude that may not be in the best interest for the local population. I am interested in digging up unexpected consequences of infrastructure development on the local lifestyle. I would like to hike/live along the trail, and listen to the stories of all actors involved.
        >
        > So what am I asking for?
        > Any sort of input would be really, really welcome. Any other trails that are undergoing similar changes (whether related to infrastructure or to climate change), any contacts who have personally hiked the trail...
        >
        > I figured that this group would be a great place to start fishing around for further ideas. Thanks for taking the time to read my post!
        >
      • charliepolecat
        Seigi, Contact Kumar on his web site: www.journeynepal.com Kumar (nanikumar) is a Nepalese living in Fort Collins and runs treks in the Everest and Annapurna
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 13, 2013
          Seigi,

          Contact Kumar on his web site: www.journeynepal.com

          Kumar (nanikumar) is a Nepalese living in Fort Collins and runs treks in the Everest and Annapurna region every year.

          If anyone can help you, it is him. He is a nice bloke.

          Kumar used to work at REI in Houston and probably does now in Ft. Collins.

          Learn how to say: Namaste. :-)
        • Joe MacLeish
          Segs: An interesting side to your thesis would be to compare a country and culture similar to Nepal of 30 years ago with Nepal to today and where you think
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 13, 2013

            Segs:

            An interesting side to your thesis would be to compare a country and culture similar to Nepal of 30 years ago with Nepal to today and where you think Nepal is going.  My wife and I trekked in Nepal in 1991.  It was very country but the people were already used to Tourists as a source of money and things.  The kids would come running up to beg for pencils, pens, money, whatever.  I was 6 days away from a road in a little mountain village and the kids came running up shouting Indiana Jones! Indiana Jones! to me.  I had my Indian Jones hat on.  The village didn’t even have electricity so where they picked that up I don’t know.  But the point is they were not an idyllic isolated country folk 20 years ago and they certainly are not now.  We traveled to Burma in Dec Jan thisyear and the people of that country are more “perfect” (maybe unchanged is a better word) than Nepal has been in at least 20 years.  The government still has its problems but the people live their lives and have not yet been bent by tourism.  I would imagine it will happen soon but as of this year it hasn’t.  If you are looking for a study of cultural change due to encroaching tourism Burma is likely to be a better contrast for you than Nepal and Burma has great trekking and hiking areas as well.

            Joe

             

            From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of segstak
            Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 8:14 PM
            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [John Muir Trail] Masters thesis & the Annapurna - would love your input!

             

             

            Hello all!

            Quick background story:
            My name is Seigi. Born and raised in California. I hiked the JMT last summer, and this website was an invaluable resource in helping me complete the trip. Phenomenal experience. Thank you all so much :)

            Now:
            I'm currently studying for a masters in international studies (within the environmental sciences department) at the University of Tokyo, in Japan. I'm still in the works of figuring out a masters thesis, and I've been looking for something that combines my academic interests (resource politics, infrastructure development, water conservation, and more.. but you get the idea) with one of my passions (such as backpacking). So far, what I've come up with is the following project: to study the impact of infrastructure development on the local population along the Annapurna Circuit, in Nepal. I would choose two target villages, one with no roads (yet) and one with, and live in each for maybe a month at a time. I have a feeling that much of the opposition to the development is from a first-world perspective, that represents a 'lets-preserve-the-exotic-culture' attitude that may not be in the best interest for the local population. I am interested in digging up unexpected consequences of infrastructure development on the local lifestyle. I would like to hike/live along the trail, and listen to the stories of all actors involved.

            So what am I asking for?
            Any sort of input would be really, really welcome. Any other trails that are undergoing similar changes (whether related to infrastructure or to climate change), any contacts who have personally hiked the trail...

            I figured that this group would be a great place to start fishing around for further ideas. Thanks for taking the time to read my post!

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