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Estimating remaining fuel in a canister

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  • John Ladd
    On another board, someone asked how to estimate remaining fuel in a canister. I thought new members of this group might have a similar question, so here s the
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 3, 2013
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      On another board, someone asked how to estimate remaining fuel in a canister. I thought new members of this group might have a similar question, so here's the answer I posted there:

      By weight. The total weight of the canisters are approximately half fuel and half container. E.g., a 110 net weight canister will weigh about 220 grams - roughly 3.5 ounces of fuel and 3.5 ounces of container You get a rough sense of heft with experience, though sound of the fluid sloshing also helps.  If can get to an  an accurate scale (found in many post offices) you can simply weigh one and mark the full weight on the bottom and later weigh an empty one, the difference being the fuel weight. So long as you knew the full and empty weight (or even either one and the listed net weight of the fuel), the current weight will tell you how much fuel you used and how much is left 

      In the field.The canisters will float when placed upside down in water, and the water line will vary depending on how much fuel is remaining in the canister. If you float a full canister (upside down) and then float an empty canister of the same brand, you can measure those water lines and mark them on your new canisters, then re-measure after the canister has been partially used. If the water line is halfway between the 'full' water line and the 'empty' water line, the canister is half full. On my current 110-gram (net weight) Snowpeak Gigapower canister the empty line is at the  line of Instructions text reading”Exceeding 120F” and the full line is at  “Gigapower de Snow Peak”

      I don't remember who first suggested the field solution, so I can't give proper credit. But "thanks" to whoever it was

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279
    • charliepolecat
      So that s why I saw all those canisters floating down the Merced River.
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 3, 2013
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        So that's why I saw all those canisters floating down the Merced River.



        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd wrote:
        >
        > On another board, someone asked how to estimate remaining fuel in a
        > canister. I thought new members of this group might have a similar
        > question, so here's the answer I posted there:
        >
        > By weight. The total weight of the canisters are approximately half fuel
        > and half container. E.g., a 110 net weight canister will weigh about 220
        > grams - roughly 3.5 ounces of fuel and 3.5 ounces of container You get a
        > rough sense of heft with experience, though sound of the fluid sloshing
        > also helps. If can get to an an accurate scale (found in many post
        > offices) you can simply weigh one and mark the full weight on the bottom
        > and later weigh an empty one, the difference being the fuel weight. So long
        > as you knew the full and empty weight (or even either one and the listed
        > net weight of the fuel), the current weight will tell you how much fuel you
        > used and how much is left
        >
        > In the field.The canisters will float when placed upside down in water, and
        > the water line will vary depending on how much fuel is remaining in the
        > canister. If you float a full canister (upside down) and then float an
        > empty canister of the same brand, you can measure those water lines and
        > mark them on your new canisters, then re-measure after the canister has
        > been partially used. If the water line is halfway between the 'full' water
        > line and the 'empty' water line, the canister is half full. On my current
        > 110-gram (net weight) Snowpeak Gigapower canister the empty line is at the
        > line of Instructions text reading"Exceeding 120F" and the full line is at
        > "Gigapower de Snow Peak"
        >
        > I don't remember who first suggested the field solution, so I can't give
        > proper credit. But "thanks" to whoever it was
        >
        > John Curran Ladd
        > 1616 Castro Street
        > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
        > 415-648-9279
        >
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