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Re: [John Muir Trail] Sun protection

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  • Don
    John, I have to give you credit for your ability to find just about everything in camo. Do you have any shots of a platoon of Marines marching in kilts? ...
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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      John, I have to give you credit for your ability to find just about everything in camo. Do you have any shots of a platoon of Marines marching in kilts?

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd wrote:

      http://sportkilt.com/product/1511/USMC-Desert-Digital-Camo-Specialty-Kilt.html
      >
      >
      > John Curran Ladd
      > 1616 Castro Street
      > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
      > 415-648-9279
      >
    • Joe MacLeish
      I use Wintersilks light weight. They are not my for warmth gloves. But in the middle of a sunny day they keep the sun off the back of my hands which
      Message 2 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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        I use Wintersilks light weight.  They are not my for warmth gloves.  But in the middle of a sunny day they keep the sun off the back of my hands which otherwise blister up pretty bad.  They are rags at the end of a three week trip though so consider them as disposable.  They are a good second layer with my for warmth gloves and they block the mosquitoes as well.
        Joe

         

        From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Erica
        Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2013 8:07 AM
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Sun protection

         

         

        Awesome list of layers - thanks! I've been trying to figure out my layer logistics, and I think this sounds like a good system. I was debating merino - but the Capilene layer sounds really nice and is SPF 50 (and is cheaper! And I'm ideally hoping to avoid animal products like wool or down...so this is good).

        The gloves are actually something I may consider - I never thought about how exposed hands are - especially when using poles, so that may definitely be worth looking into. Does anyone know of a particular brand?

        Does any one have any thoughts on environmentally-friendly sunscreens? I know you should never jump into a lake slathered with bug spray and sunscreen for contamination...but I wonder even about the effects when rinsing off away from a sitting body of water.

      • Frank Dumville
        I like to cover up. OR Sun Runner cap with neck cape. Wrap around sunglasses, or glacier glasses on snow. Long sleeve nylon shirt and pants. Cheap cotton
        Message 3 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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          I like to cover up.
          OR Sun Runner cap with neck cape.
          Wrap around sunglasses, or glacier glasses on snow.
          Long sleeve nylon shirt and pants.
          Cheap cotton garden gloves on my hands.
          A full beard with a dap of sunscreen and lip balm protects my face. If you're hiking on large snowfields remember that the reflected snow can burn so put sunscreen inside your nostrils and cover your lips well. A face mask may be desired on snow if you have sensitive skin.
          I add a headnet and this kit got me through the height of mosquito season with a little plant based bug repellent.
          I used the same kit in the desert sections of the PCT.
           
          Snap
           

          From: Erica <xericamunsonx@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, February 1, 2013 11:25 PM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Sun protection
           
          I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes. Going to invest in some new polarized sunglasses. I'm thinking a long-sleeve shirt might be the best protection - does anyone have any recommendations for one that won't cause me to overheat?

          What about hats - any particular styles people find the most functional?

          Also SPF chapstick and lotion..which I'm not thrilled about taking up precious space in my bear container...but I no doubt would need for my face, if not my arms at least...I don't want to take home skin cancer as my souvenir from the trail! But if any of you have some good sun-proofing tips...I'm all ears!

        • Darryl
          Great discussion and important too! Remember, sun damage is cumulative and irreversible On Wednesday I got stitches removed as a result of a surgical
          Message 4 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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            Great discussion and important too! Remember, sun damage is cumulative and irreversible On Wednesday I got stitches removed as a result of a surgical procedure for squamous cell carcinoma from sun damage to the back of my thigh acquired in my youth. I have a very fair skin so I have learned to be diligent about protecting myself.
            Here are a few suggestions:
            When walking on snow, make sure you put sunscreen inside the orifice of your nostrils to protect yourself from reflected rays. I have even heard stories of people on Mt Rainier burning the roof of their mouths from rays reflected by the snow.
            I agree with Allen C's recommendation earlier in this topic that the Sun Runner hat from Outdoor Research provides excellent protection.
            I like the Aloe Gator sunscreen gel. A little goes a long way and it seems to stay on longer than many of the others.
            You may consider wearing a buff under your collar to protect the front of your neck, but watch your temperature so you don't overheat.
            I keep a stick of SPF lip lbalm in my pants pocket so I can quickly whip it out and replenish the sunscreen around my mouth and nose without having to take my pack off.
            If you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier.
            Gloves really help protect your hands. Get a pair of gloves that breathes well otherwise your hands will get all sweaty. Then you'll take off your gloves and that defeats the purpose.

            Darryl

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
            >
            > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
            >
            > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.
          • robert shattuck
            if you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier You will sweat and for me I ve found that just keeping
            Message 5 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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              "if you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier" 

              You will sweat and for me I've found that just keeping anything, sunscreen, bug juice––off my forehead means I won't be getting it in my eyes. no fun. 

              I also just use a pair of bike gloves . . . 

              bob

              http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
              From: dabrahms@...
              Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2013 01:05:20 +0000
              Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Sun protection

               
              Great discussion and important too! Remember, sun damage is cumulative and irreversible On Wednesday I got stitches removed as a result of a surgical procedure for squamous cell carcinoma from sun damage to the back of my thigh acquired in my youth. I have a very fair skin so I have learned to be diligent about protecting myself.
              Here are a few suggestions:
              When walking on snow, make sure you put sunscreen inside the orifice of your nostrils to protect yourself from reflected rays. I have even heard stories of people on Mt Rainier burning the roof of their mouths from rays reflected by the snow.
              I agree with Allen C's recommendation earlier in this topic that the Sun Runner hat from Outdoor Research provides excellent protection.
              I like the Aloe Gator sunscreen gel. A little goes a long way and it seems to stay on longer than many of the others.
              You may consider wearing a buff under your collar to protect the front of your neck, but watch your temperature so you don't overheat.
              I keep a stick of SPF lip lbalm in my pants pocket so I can quickly whip it out and replenish the sunscreen around my mouth and nose without having to take my pack off.
              If you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier.
              Gloves really help protect your hands. Get a pair of gloves that breathes well otherwise your hands will get all sweaty. Then you'll take off your gloves and that defeats the purpose.

              Darryl

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
              >
              > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
              >
              > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.


            • charliepolecat
              I just don t put sunscreen above my eyes, solves the problem.
              Message 6 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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                I just don't put sunscreen above my eyes, solves the problem.



                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck wrote:
                >
                >
                > "if you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier"
                > You will sweat and for me I've found that just keeping anything, sunscreen, bug juice––off my forehead means I won't be getting it in my eyes. no fun.
                > I also just use a pair of bike gloves . . .
                > bob
                >
                > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
                >
                >
                >
                > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                > From: dabrahms@...
                > Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2013 01:05:20 +0000
                > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Sun protection
                >
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                > Great discussion and important too! Remember, sun damage is cumulative and irreversible On Wednesday I got stitches removed as a result of a surgical procedure for squamous cell carcinoma from sun damage to the back of my thigh acquired in my youth. I have a very fair skin so I have learned to be diligent about protecting myself.
                >
                > Here are a few suggestions:
                >
                > When walking on snow, make sure you put sunscreen inside the orifice of your nostrils to protect yourself from reflected rays. I have even heard stories of people on Mt Rainier burning the roof of their mouths from rays reflected by the snow.
                >
                > I agree with Allen C's recommendation earlier in this topic that the Sun Runner hat from Outdoor Research provides excellent protection.
                >
                > I like the Aloe Gator sunscreen gel. A little goes a long way and it seems to stay on longer than many of the others.
                >
                > You may consider wearing a buff under your collar to protect the front of your neck, but watch your temperature so you don't overheat.
                >
                > I keep a stick of SPF lip lbalm in my pants pocket so I can quickly whip it out and replenish the sunscreen around my mouth and nose without having to take my pack off.
                >
                > If you sweat and get sunscreen in your eyes, putting Vaseline on your eyebrows helps create a barrier.
                >
                > Gloves really help protect your hands. Get a pair of gloves that breathes well otherwise your hands will get all sweaty. Then you'll take off your gloves and that defeats the purpose.
                >
                >
                >
                > Darryl
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
                >
                > >
                >
                > > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Erica" wrote:
                >
                > >
                >
                > > I'm trying to figure out the best system for sun-protection at higher altitudes.
                >
              • John Ladd
                ... Nah. The best I can do is Scot soldiers at work [image: Inline image 1] or Marines in camp [image: Inline image 2] It is worth remembering, though, that
                Message 7 of 23 , Feb 2, 2013
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                  On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Don <amrowinc@...> wrote:
                  Do you have any shots of a platoon of Marines marching in kilts?

                  Nah. The best I can do is Scot soldiers at work

                  Inline image 1
                  or Marines in camp

                  Inline image 2

                  It is worth remembering, though, that kilts were developed for walking in mountains.

                  John Curran Ladd
                  1616 Castro Street
                  San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                  415-648-9279
                • charliepolecat
                  It is worth remembering, though, that kilts were developed for walking in mountains. Um, actually: The kilt first appeared as the great kilt, the breacan or
                  Message 8 of 23 , Feb 3, 2013
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                    "It is worth remembering, though, that kilts were developed for walking in mountains."

                    Um, actually:

                    The kilt first appeared as the great kilt, the breacan or belted plaid, is most likely Norse in origin and not Celtic as many assume.[citation needed] The Irish, known as Scotti, who migrated to Scotland and gave the region of north Britain its name, never wore kilts prior to their arrival in northern Britain,[citation needed] nor did their kinsmen, the Brythonic speaking tribes of Britain,[citation needed] nor their Goidelic speaking kinsmen in Ireland.[citation needed] It has been documented in historical accounts Celtic tribes wore trousers, which the Romans called bracae, as did many other neighboring peoples to the Romans. The great kilt was a full-length garment whose upper half could be worn as a cloak draped over the shoulder, or brought up over the head. The philibeg or small kilt, also known as the walking kilt (similar to the modern kilt) was invented by an English Quaker from Lancashire called Thomas Rawlinson sometime in the 1720s for the use of the Highlanders he and Iain MacDonnell, chief of the MacDonnells of Inverness employed in logging, charcoal manufacture and iron smelting, for which the belted plaid was "cumbrous and unwieldy".[1]
                  • Don Amundson
                    I think it may be awhile before the US Marines make kilts standard issue. While I like the idea of kilts for their airiness I hate the weight. Running shorts
                    Message 9 of 23 , Feb 3, 2013
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                      I think it may be awhile before the US Marines make kilts standard issue.  While I like the idea of kilts for their airiness I hate the weight.  Running shorts with a liner is my preference.   

                      Sent from my iPad

                      On Feb 2, 2013, at 8:05 PM, "John Ladd" <johnladd@...> wrote:

                       

                      On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Don <amrowinc@...> wrote:
                      Do you have any shots of a platoon of Marines marching in kilts?

                      Nah. The best I can do is Scot soldiers at work

                      Inline image 1
                      or Marines in camp

                      Inline image 2

                      It is worth remembering, though, that kilts were developed for walking in mountains.

                      John Curran Ladd
                      1616 Castro Street
                      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                      415-648-9279

                    • outhiking_55
                      Mountain Hardware makes a kilt (or at least I think they still make it) with DWR finish and UPF 50. Unlike other kilts its pleated in the back. For privacy you
                      Message 10 of 23 , Feb 3, 2013
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                        Mountain Hardware makes a kilt (or at least I think they still make it) with DWR finish and UPF 50. Unlike other kilts its pleated in the back. For privacy you can snap the part that folds over on the front inside to the rear.

                        http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Elkommando%E2%84%A2-Kilt/OM3417,default,pd.html

                        Kim

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Don Amundson wrote:
                        >
                        > I think it may be awhile before the US Marines make kilts standard issue. While I like the idea of kilts for their airiness I hate the weight. Running shorts with a liner is my preference.
                        >
                        > Sent from my iPad
                        >
                        > On Feb 2, 2013, at 8:05 PM, "John Ladd" wrote:
                        >
                        > > On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Don wrote:
                        > >> Do you have any shots of a platoon of Marines marching in kilts?
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Nah. The best I can do is Scot soldiers at work
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > or Marines in camp
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > It is worth remembering, though, that kilts were developed for walking in mountains.
                        > >
                        > > John Curran Ladd
                        > > 1616 Castro Street
                        > > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                        > > 415-648-9279
                        > >
                        >
                      • Erica
                        Thanks for everyone for their tips here! I think I m definitely going to get the Coolibar fingerless gloves - the sleeves sound interesting (I have a tattoo
                        Message 11 of 23 , Feb 6, 2013
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                          Thanks for everyone for their tips here! I think I'm definitely going to get the Coolibar fingerless gloves - the sleeves sound interesting (I have a tattoo sleeve on one arm that I try to protect from the sun - so having the option to have the sleeve on only that arm if I wanted might be nice). I'm also thinking a long-sleeve may just be the way to go as not showering and slathering on layers of sunblock and bug spray everyday doesn't sound very appealing :)

                          Which brings the question - by last week of August / early Sept - will the mosquitos still be active?
                        • Larry Beck
                          As it is turning out, this year late August/early September will probably be pretty much mosquito free :) This is not always true in the case of heavy/late
                          Message 12 of 23 , Feb 6, 2013
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                            As it is turning out, this year late August/early September will probably be pretty much mosquito free :)
                            This is not always true in the case of heavy/late snowfall years though.




                            From: Erica <xericamunsonx@...>
                            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wed, February 6, 2013 9:19:22 AM
                            Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Sun protection

                             

                            Thanks for everyone for their tips here! I think I'm definitely going to get the Coolibar fingerless gloves - the sleeves sound interesting (I have a tattoo sleeve on one arm that I try to protect from the sun - so having the option to have the sleeve on only that arm if I wanted might be nice). I'm also thinking a long-sleeve may just be the way to go as not showering and slathering on layers of sunblock and bug spray everyday doesn't sound very appealing :)

                            Which brings the question - by last week of August / early Sept - will the mosquitos still be active?

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