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Re: camp: sleep without tent

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  • Don
    Best to avoid the OHT if you want to stay dry. I did that trail in 2010 was pretty well saturated more than once. And that was just from walking through wet
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 1, 2013
      Best to avoid the OHT if you want to stay dry. I did that trail in 2010 was pretty well saturated more than once. And that was just from walking through wet vegetation in the morning. It was the first time I experienced condensation splatter, heavy condensation on the tent walls being bounced off by heavy rain hitting the outside.
      Having said that, the OHT is well worth hiking if you ever have the chance. It's a 180 miles of a very different environment from the JMT.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "charliepolecat" wrote:
      >
      > A while ago on the Ozark Highland Trail I slept sans tent near the side of a lake. The next morning everything was covered with a heavy dew and my sleeping bag and me were soaking wet. Best to take an hygrometer with you.;-)
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" wrote:
      > >
      > > For those with down sleeping bags, how can we determine in the evening whether condensation will be significant enough overnight to get the outside of the bag more than a little wet? I like the idea of camping outside my tent in good weather but this issue has been in the back of my mind. I've always used a tent and find it difficult to predict when condensation will be on the tent in the morning.
      > sleep in the
      >
    • John Ladd
      My experience in the Sierra is similar to Don s. I sometimes used to get condensation inside a tent, but rarely when I sleep in the open. I avoid wet,
      Message 2 of 19 , Feb 1, 2013
        My experience in the Sierra is similar to Don's. I sometimes used to get condensation inside a tent, but rarely when I sleep in the open.  I avoid wet, low-lying campsites near meadows. Even a little breeze seems to keep the condensation away and anything on the bag when I wake up has usually dried off by the time I back up the bag.  If not, what little is there will dry out at a lunch stop.

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279


        On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 10:05 AM, Don <amrowinc@...> wrote:
         

        Condensation won't be a much of a problem cowboy camping on the JMT In a tent remember you're pumping out moist warm air with your breath and creating an condensation incubation environment. That moist warm air hits the colder walls of your shelter and creates condensation. I have yet to see a tent that vents well enough to totally eliminate condensation when the elements conspire to create the moisture. Sleeping in the open all that warm air freely circulates with the colder air, hence no condensation. Now if you camp in a low lying area next to a lake all bets are off. Chose your campsite wisely, higher ground, tree cover etc. all help. 

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