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Re: Trekking poles vs Hand loops

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  • Allen C
    I second the recommendation for the BD Alpine Carbon Cork poles. I used them on my trip last year and they were great for both hiking and for supporting my
    Message 1 of 28 , Jan 31, 2013
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      I second the recommendation for the BD Alpine Carbon Cork poles. I used them on my trip last year and they were great for both hiking and for supporting my tarp. The cork grips and straps are comfortable, they don't collapse and they were plenty strong and pretty light.

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" wrote:
      >
      > After more research I ended up going with the Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork. There is a good price available on the 2012 model if anyone else is interested in these poles ($113 vs. $159 list price for 2013 model):
      >
      > http://www.backcountryedge.com/black_diamond-alpine-carbon-cork-2012.aspx
      >
      > These poles seem to have uniformly good reviews everywhere I look. Lightweight and apparently durable as well. Here is one:
      >
      > http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Trekking-Poles-Reviews/Black-Diamond-Alpine-Carbon-Cork
      >
      > Carbon Cork appeared to be one of the better poles when I took a look at REI last weekend.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Adam ." wrote:
      > >
      > > I will also add that I've had a pair of junker poles from Walmart with
      > > twist locking fail while on the trail. Inside the tube, they have this
      > > little rubber stopper that came loose and no amount of dismantling on trail
      > > or off could fix it. After that, I only do the flick lock pole style, which
      > > sometimes get a little loose but is easily tightened with a screwdriver.
      > >
      > > Also, keep an eye on the tips of your poles. After about 3 years of abuse
      > > and neglect on my part, the tip of my pole snapped off while coming down
      > > off Forrester Pass. They still worked, but I was grinding into the bottom
      > > of the aluminum tube. Fortunately, I only had a day to hike on them, so I
      > > didn't really damage the pole. Had I been more attentive, I would've spent
      > > the $20 to replace my tips.
      > >
      > > Also, replacing the tips is really easy to do but I couldn't find anywhere
      > > online that told me how. After fighting with it for like 45 mins, I
      > > realized you can just use a knife to slice a vertical slit into the top of
      > > the plastic tip to release the pressure and the tip pops right off. Slide a
      > > new tip on, give it a few jams into the ground, and you're good to go.
      > >
      > > A
      > >
      > > On Wed, Dec 26, 2012 at 4:33 PM, robert shattuck wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Ravi,
      > > >
      > > > just don't buy junker poles from walmart/walgreens or some such place. Buy
      > > > them from someone who makes outdoor gear . . . if you pay less than what
      > > > you might pay for a pair of REI poles:
      > > >
      > > >
      >
    • ravi_jmt2013
      After hiking with trekking poles for the past six months and being saved from several minor mishaps, I was spared a potentially more serious incident yesterday
      Message 2 of 28 , Jul 7, 2013
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        After hiking with trekking poles for the past six months and being saved from several minor mishaps, I was spared a potentially more serious incident yesterday during a stream crossing. I was crossing a creek that was perhaps 50 feet wide and running pretty well due to recent rains. However, it was only a few feet deep so I didn't treat it seriously enough. Also, there were attractively spaced rocks so I thought I could avoid wading by rock hopping (brilliant). Due to humidity and moisture, the rocks were more slippery than they appeared and I lost my footing. The trekking poles allowed me to recover to the point where I landed in the stream in a sitting position rather without a single scratch or any injury. Some of that was luck but a big part was being able to control my fall.

        The good news is that I learned that it is better to just wade through crossings rather than rock hop on what could be slippery surfaces. And my zPacks liner worked perfectly. Despite the bottom half of my bag being submerged for at least a minute while I struggled to get up, nothing inside including my sleeping bag got wet.

        Anyway, thanks to those who convinced me to start using trekking poles! I would encourage anyone on the fence to at least experiment with a cheap set of poles. My BD Carbon Cork poles are on the expensive side but worth every penny. Added bonus was that I lightened up my shelter making the poles dual use.
      • casey
        I can t stand it, have to ask! Were your hands in the straps or not?
        Message 3 of 28 , Jul 7, 2013
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          I can't stand it, have to ask! Were your hands in the straps or not?



          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
          >
          > After hiking with trekking poles for the past six months and being saved from several minor mishaps, I was spared a potentially more serious incident yesterday during a stream crossing. I was crossing a creek that was perhaps 50 feet wide and running pretty well due to recent rains. However, it was only a few feet deep so I didn't treat it seriously enough. Also, there were attractively spaced rocks so I thought I could avoid wading by rock hopping (brilliant). Due to humidity and moisture, the rocks were more slippery than they appeared and I lost my footing. The trekking poles allowed me to recover to the point where I landed in the stream in a sitting position rather without a single scratch or any injury. Some of that was luck but a big part was being able to control my fall.
          >
          > The good news is that I learned that it is better to just wade through crossings rather than rock hop on what could be slippery surfaces. And my zPacks liner worked perfectly. Despite the bottom half of my bag being submerged for at least a minute while I struggled to get up, nothing inside including my sleeping bag got wet.
          >
          > Anyway, thanks to those who convinced me to start using trekking poles! I would encourage anyone on the fence to at least experiment with a cheap set of poles. My BD Carbon Cork poles are on the expensive side but worth every penny. Added bonus was that I lightened up my shelter making the poles dual use.
          >
        • ravi_jmt2013
          ... In the straps. I was hiking along on a good trail, came to the crossing and stupidly didn t take it seriously. Hands in the straps, pack waist belt on. I
          Message 4 of 28 , Jul 7, 2013
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            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "casey" <casey.cox@...> wrote:
            >
            > I can't stand it, have to ask! Were your hands in the straps or not?
            >

            In the straps. I was hiking along on a good trail, came to the crossing and stupidly didn't take it seriously. Hands in the straps, pack waist belt on. I figure that I made every mistake in the book. Better now than on the JMT so I feel like my many training hikes are providing some benefit of experience beyond the physical conditioning.
          • casey
            At a crossing that seems iffy I ll release my waist belt, chest strap, and take off one shoulder strap. When I purchase a new set of trekking poles the
            Message 5 of 28 , Jul 7, 2013
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              At a crossing that seems "iffy" I'll release my waist belt, chest strap, and take off one shoulder strap. When I purchase a new set of trekking poles the first thing I do is remove the wrist straps.

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "ravi_jmt2013" <ravi@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "casey" <casey.cox@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I can't stand it, have to ask! Were your hands in the straps or not?
              > >
              >
              > In the straps. I was hiking along on a good trail, came to the crossing and stupidly didn't take it seriously. Hands in the straps, pack waist belt on. I figure that I made every mistake in the book. Better now than on the JMT so I feel like my many training hikes are providing some benefit of experience beyond the physical conditioning.
              >
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