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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Packs that take weight off the shoulders.

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  • John
    Interesting set-up Roleigh, but while it may provide better balance, I can t help but think that all or most of that Camelback s weight falls on your shoulders
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 30, 2012
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    Interesting set-up Roleigh, but while it may provide better balance, I can't help but think that all or most of that Camelback's weight falls on your shoulders (albeit forward weight).  To me, skin-out weight is felt least when positioned/directed on or near the centered strength of our pelvic girdles (waist).  I think we would all agree that the lion's share of our pack's weight must ride on the waist rather than the shoulders to minimize pain and discomfort, while maximizing endurance.    

    Even though I own two types of hydration bladders for other activities, I am not a fan of bladders used inside the main pack and prefer easily accessible hydrating vessels for the following reasons:

     - ease of filling without unpacking/re-packing the bladder.
     -  lost internal pack volume due to stowed bladder.
     - potential leak problems with an internally-stowed bladder (eg. saturated equipment such as down bag, jacket, or other hydro-phobic items.
     - ability to easily monitor fluid intake and fluid stores.
     - multiple plastic bottles (such as G-rade bottles) still weigh less than a hydration bladder, hose, and mouthpiece.
     - ease of/cost of replacement should a vessel leak. 
     - no disinfecting or clean up hassles - just get new disposable (and recyclable)  bottles.  

    On my abbreviated 2012 JMT trip, I experimented with a Marmot fanny/lumbar pack (sorry...unknown model) which houses two pouches for bottles between a main pouch that was perfect for quick access to things like maps, snacks, etc.  I donned the waist pack (facing forward) before putting on my primary pack (Osprey Atmos 50).  While this concept is nothing new to the backpack world, I was very satisfied with the fit, feel, and functionality of the set up.  I usually carry between 1-2 liters for most Sierra excursions, so this works great for me.  YMMV

    Here's a pic of my set-up with the black Marmot waist pack fitted with two Gatorade bottles on either side of the "kangaroo pouch".
     
     
  • Ned Tibbits
    To each his own, really, on the subject of choosing a pack that takes weight off the shoulders. You have to experiment in-store with weight inside and the
    Message 2 of 18 , Dec 30, 2012
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      To each his own, really, on the subject of choosing a pack that takes weight off the shoulders. You have to experiment in-store with weight inside and the sales people making adjustments alongside. Some places do have various packs in their rental system, so experiment with them first.
       
      We have not had any luck here at Mountain Education carrying two weeks’ gear on extended courses using most any UL pack. Thus, we still use 1980s Kelty packs, winter or summer.
       
       
      Ned Tibbits, Director
      Mountain Education
      www.mountaineducation.org
       
      Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 9:41 AM
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Packs that take weight off the shoulders.
       
       

      Thanks for all the responses.
       
      I've been using internal frame packs for years but I haven't had much luck using the load lifters or moving the straps up to relieve the tension my neck and shoulders.
       
      It looks like I'll have to try an external frame.
       
      Snap   
       
       
       
    • charliepolecat
      Real men carry Kelty packs, ultra lights are for girly-men. ;-)
      Message 3 of 18 , Dec 31, 2012
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        Real men carry Kelty packs, ultra lights are for girly-men. ;-)



        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Tibbits" <ned@...> wrote:
        >
        > To each his own, really, on the subject of choosing a pack that takes weight off the shoulders. You have to experiment in-store with weight inside and the sales people making adjustments alongside. Some places do have various packs in their rental system, so experiment with them first.
        >
        > We have not had any luck here at Mountain Education carrying two weeks’ gear on extended courses using most any UL pack. Thus, we still use 1980s Kelty packs, winter or summer.
        >
        >
        > Ned Tibbits, Director
        > Mountain Education
        > www.mountaineducation.org
        >
      • Darryl
        We may want to consider posture in the equation. In A.J. Jacobs book Drop Dead Healthy , the author quotes a walking specialist who says that in America we
        Message 4 of 18 , Dec 31, 2012
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          We may want to consider posture in the equation. In A.J. Jacobs' book "Drop Dead Healthy", the author quotes a "walking specialist" who says that in America we tend to lean back too much when we walk, like Robert Crumb's immortal Keep on Trucking' image http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/the-70s/images/482814/title/keep-on-truckin-photo
          The walking specialist suggests that it is more natural to lean forward and stick your butt out more a-la Mick Jagger's peacock stance. I tried it and it worked for me. It may not look cool, but it shifts the center of gravity back towards your hips and takes a lot of weight off the shoulders.
          I recognize the conventional wisdom is that walking upright is the correct posture, but I found it much more comfortable bending over slightly and taking more weight on my hips. If you look at Sherpas, you'll notice they do the same. I'm sure this may be quite controversial and the vision of thousands of Mick Jagger's prancing along the John Muir trail may not be palatable to many....
          Darryl

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Frank Dumville <nccctsd@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have started to have some issues with my neck so I'm looking for a pack that would get most, if not all, the weight off my shoulders onto the hips. I'm pushing my base weight down but would like to be able to carry up to 30 pounds total for long hauls.
          > Any suggestions.
          >  
          > Snap
          >
        • John Ladd
          On Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 6:37 AM, charliepolecat
          Message 5 of 18 , Dec 31, 2012
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            On Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 6:37 AM, charliepolecat <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
             

            Real men carry Kelty packs, ultra lights are for girly-men. ;-)



            Nah. I think Ned's point was that it was harder to carry a load in a UL pack. You UL guys are the real men.  
          • rnagarajan
            ... Is this the same school of thought as the opinion that runners should keep weight on the ball of their feet rather than the heel? Maybe a more forward
            Message 6 of 18 , Dec 31, 2012
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              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Darryl" <dabrahms@...> wrote:
              >
              > The walking specialist suggests that it is more natural to lean forward and stick your butt out more a-la Mick Jagger's peacock stance. I tried it and it worked for me. It may not look cool, but it shifts the center of gravity back towards your hips and takes a lot of weight off the shoulders.
              >

              Is this the same school of thought as the opinion that runners should keep weight on the ball of their feet rather than the heel? Maybe a more forward lean is the "natural" way to run/walk for humans before the development of modern footwear. I know that I've had far fewer running injuries since adopting a forward leaning running stride.
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