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Re: [John Muir Trail] Sun and Rain Protection

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  • jmt_2013
    Thanks for the heads up on the harness from AntiGravity Gear. Now all I would need is a cup of milk tea in my hand to complete the picture. Darryl
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 2, 2012
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      Thanks for the heads up on the harness from AntiGravity Gear. Now all I would need is a cup of milk tea in my hand to complete the picture.

      Darryl

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Kim Fishburn <animalfarm99@...> wrote:

      > I've been thinking of hiking with an umbrella for a couple years. I think
      > you'll be cooler during the day, and if it provides enough protection in
      > the rain you won't get hot. I'm more interested in the harness that
      > AntiGravity Gear sells which allows you to attach the umbrella to your
      > chest so you're hands are still free to use hiking poles.
      > Kim
      >
      > On Sun, Dec 2, 2012 at 12:39 PM, jmt_2013 <dabrahms@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > As someone who is very fair-skin, I am cognizant of the importance of
      > > having good sun protection at high evelations like on the JMT. I find that
      > > Aloe Gator 40+ Gel Sunblock works well for me. Because of the sun exposure
      > > in many parts of the JMT, I have purchased a GoLite Chrome Dome umbrella to
      > > provide shade at rest points. Is it advisable to use this umbrella for rain
      > > protection as well, or would I be creating a lightning hazard during the
      > > notorious JMT thunderstorms?
      > > Thanks,
      > > Darryl
      > >
      > > __._,_
      > >
      >
    • John Ladd
      ... Maybe I m unlucky, but I also have Barbara s experience. Short afternoon thunderstorms have been frequent (and welcome, because I love how they cool me
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2012
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        On Sun, Dec 2, 2012 at 1:47 PM, Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...> wrote:
         

        Re rain in the Sierra. It rained very afternoon during my 2 + weeks last August, plus a good couple of thunder and lightning events with downpours. Some say that's unusual, tho I'm in the Sierras every year off and on in July/August/ September, and often get some rain. So, just be prepared! 


        Maybe I'm unlucky, but I also have Barbara's experience. Short afternoon thunderstorms have been frequent (and welcome, because I love how they cool me off).  But I'd say at least half of my Sierra trips have had at least one nighttime rain (some short and some most of the night) and about one out of three have had a multi-hour rain during at least one day. 

        I wouldn't worry that much about an umbrella and lightening. Most (all?) places where you wouldn't want the umbrella up, you don't want to be without the umbrella either.  You just don't want either the umbrella or your head or your tent poles to be the highest point within about a 50 foot radius.  You also don't want to be close to the highest thing within 50 feet as current flows out from the base of anything hit.

        Lots of good lightning advice here:


        Following the advice there is more significant, I think, than the use or avoidance of an umbrella

        I'm a big fan of good raingear, in part because it has additional uses for wind protection and warmth. You can even wear it inside a sleeping bag for a vapor barrier on really cold nights. 

        See 

        In extreme cold conditions (which are very dry due to cold air not being able to hold moisture), you should consider a vapor barrier liner or vapor barrier clothing. These can limit the cooling caused by evaporative heat loss and reduce the water needed to stay hydrated, but may feel clammy at warmer temperatures.
      • scriv.ener
        Darryl, It is wise to be cautious about lightning, but placement of you has a whole lot more to do with creating a lightning hazard than the equipment you re
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2012
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          Darryl,

          It is wise to be cautious about lightning, but placement of you has a whole lot more to do with "creating a lightning hazard" than the equipment you're wearing. See the NOLS lightning safety guidelines:
          http://snipurl.com/25rgqmn

          Jeffrey

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "jmt_2013" <dabrahms@...> wrote:
          >
          > ... I have purchased a GoLite Chrome Dome umbrella to provide
          > shade at rest points. Is it advisable to use this umbrella for
          > rain protection as well, or would I be creating a lightning
          > hazard during the notorious JMT thunderstorms?
        • Don
          I have the GoLite Chrome Dome umbrella I use here in So. Cal. on blistering days. You might find you re able to hike with it as it will offer super protection
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 4, 2012
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            I have the GoLite Chrome Dome umbrella I use here in So. Cal. on blistering days. You might find you're able to hike with it as it will offer super protection for your fair skin besides offering rain protection if needed.

            As far as the lightning hazard, metal doesn't attract lightning. It does conduct it though. This site has some good info to help you decide.

            http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/myths.htm

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "jmt_2013" <dabrahms@...> wrote:
            >
            > As someone who is very fair-skin, I am cognizant of the importance of having good sun protection at high evelations like on the JMT. I find that Aloe Gator 40+ Gel Sunblock works well for me. Because of the sun exposure in many parts of the JMT, I have purchased a GoLite Chrome Dome umbrella to provide shade at rest points. Is it advisable to use this umbrella for rain protection as well, or would I be creating a lightning hazard during the notorious JMT thunderstorms?
            > Thanks,
            > Darryl
            >
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