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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: OVERDUE HIKER

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  • Ned Tibbits
    Let me emphasize the last point John said, “Remember that these rules apply to you even if you are a very experienced, capable hiker.” Although I spend
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 2, 2012
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      Let me emphasize the last point John said, “Remember that these rules apply to you even if you are a very experienced, capable hiker.”
       
      Although I spend much of my time each year training (for National Ski Patrol, Wilderness EMT, Search and Rescue, and urban Paramedics) and improving my skill and knowledge base to pass on to our students, situations and circumstances have happened to me that, either I didn’t notice because I was distracted, missed some detail around me, or didn’t consider the possibility of during planning/prep, caught me off-guard and put me in a dangerous position. So, even the experienced and wise can get in trouble!
       
      What did Daniel Boone answer about whether he had ever gotten lost? Something like, “No. Just momentarily misplaced.”
       
      Know the Realities of the Trail ahead, prepare for them (even if they probably won’t happen), and enjoy the trip! If you don’t know what they could be, then get some advice or training, test it for yourself (to see if it “works” for you), and you’ll rest easier, be more aware, and certainly be more confident out there!
       
       
      Ned Tibbits, Director
      Mountain Education
      www.mountaineducation.org
       
      From: John Ladd
      Sent: Friday, November 02, 2012 9:29 AM
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: OVERDUE HIKER
       
       

      On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 8:22 AM, Sierracanon <dlink_95670@...> wrote:

      Yesterday, SEKI stated that the search had been suspended.
       
      That's sad, but rescue is dangerous and at some point the diminishing hopes of rescue are outweighed by risk to the SAR teams, esp. in worsening weather. 
       
      The lessons here would seem to be: (1) Always leave a trip plan with someone. (2) Carry at least a Spot Tracker to identify your location if immobilized by weather or injury, if not a full-on Sat phone. (3) Remember that these rules apply to you even if you are a very experienced, capable hiker.
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