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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trail conditions and a big thank you

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  • Roleigh Martin
    Oh yes, Camelbak depicts the Pakteen in their military gear hardware: http://www.camelbak.com/Military-Tactical/Packs/Pakteen.aspx ... Visit my Google Profile
    Message 1 of 34 , Jul 3, 2012
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      Oh yes, Camelbak depicts the Pakteen in their military gear hardware:

      http://www.camelbak.com/Military-Tactical/Packs/Pakteen.aspx
      -------------------------------------------------
      Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
      _

    • Allen C
      Just a few comments on the rather controversial quote below from Mr. Ladd on total energy expenditure - wherein no one seems to be taking into account the
      Message 34 of 34 , Jul 4, 2012
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        Just a few comments on the rather controversial quote below from Mr. Ladd on total energy expenditure - wherein no one seems to be taking into account the energy expenditure BEFORE the hike:

        1. For those with more money than time, it may be more efficient to lose 5 lbs packweight - it takes just a few hours to a few days wages to upgrade to some lighter gear (depending on your hourly pay rate of course). It may be hard to lose that 5 lbs when you are eating 7 course dinners at expensive fundraisers every night, hobnobbing with the rich and famous, and racking up the frequent flier miles.

        2. Most people could probably lighten up by 5 lbs without spending any additional money - just by leaving some truly unnecessary stuff at home or making smarter purchases when they do buy new gear.

        3. For those with more time and excess bodyfat than money, it is probably more cost/energy efficient to lose 5 lbs in bodyweight and carry the heavier gear (eating less saves you money which you can then use to buy lighter gear!). These people have lots of time to train so no problem! But still leave the extra stuff at home!

        4. If you can, why not lose both and go 10 lbs lighter? It's not like you have to choose.

        5. For those of us who don't have 5 extra lbs of bodyweight to lose, lighter gear makes a lot of sense. Especially if it works just as well, which in many cases it does - sometimes better.

        > I would also argue (and have argued) that it is often better to reduce your
        > total weight by losing five pounds of bodyweight as compared to a five
        > pounds reduction by choosing overly minimal equipment or leaving things
        > like raingear at home. Either five pounds has essentially the same effect
        > on the energy your body has to expend to move uphill. (I do not mean to
        > suggest this to people who are already at the lower limit of safe body fat.)
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