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Re: [John Muir Trail] Re: Fixing Your Feet

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  • John Ladd
    I find the best way to experiment with new ideas on foot protection is to do try one new thing at a time -- but on one foot only and then compare the two feet
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 30, 2012
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      I find the best way to experiment with new ideas on foot protection is to do try one new thing at a time -- but on one foot only and then compare the two feet - the treated one with the untreated one.  You can figure out pretty fast what works for you and what doesn't.  Once you discover a treatment works, start using it on both feet, and then try the next treatment on the "test" foot. repeat until you find your sweet spot.

      I haven't tried anywhere near all of the various suggestions, but I have tried many of them and now have something I am pretty confident about.  My feet aren't as tough as they used to be, but I'm definitely not limited be them and they don't (hardly ever) hurt.

      For me, the things that don't work - others have had different experiences

      the various anti-sweat treatments and the "glide" products. But that may be because my feet don't sweat much

      duct tape and athletic tape

      Band-Aid Advanced Healing Blister Cushions (or similar products)

      footwear a size too big (yes I walked around in a mismatched pair of boots)

      But for others these things work, so I don't think you will know until you try them.

      The stuff that does work for me has mostly already been mentioned.

      Two things that I don't think anyone has mentioned yet is are (1) medicated foot powder (I use Zeasorb AF).  I don't think of it as a necessity, but I love how it feels on my feet when I put my socks on in the morning or after an airing.  I repackage it in a small shaker bottle (a tooth powder bottle) and (2) a small piece of really light pumice for taking dead skin off my heels and the side of my big toe and in order to address any toenail problems.  

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279


    • Robert
      I am with John on duct tape being highly over-rated as a blister proventer. A - it doesn t really stick worth a darn, and B - it doesn t breath. I don t use
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 1 6:57 AM
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        I am with John on duct tape being highly over-rated as a blister proventer. A - it doesn't really stick worth a darn, and B - it doesn't breath. I don't use mole skin much, but THIN moleskin applied to known hot spots can be effective. I personally prefer pre-taping with good quality cloth athletic tape. I put it on when my feet are dry, put on thin breathable socks, being careful not to let any edges roll up, and let the heat of my feet and pressure from the sock make the tape adhere to my foot. I leave it on until at starts to come off a few days later. By then my feet are usually toughened up and I don't need it, except in any new hotspots that may develop. I wear trailrunners when hiking so the moisture issue isn't yoo big of a deal for me. I have tried the liner sock theoery as well, but it just adds more bulk, heat and friction inside the shoe and , FOR ME, just doesn't work.

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Sat, Jun 30, 2012 at 6:59 AM, ya_ha_who <sierranevada@...>wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > In my opinion, Moleskin is the last step when all else has failed.
        > >
        >
        > .. You *can* use it when all else has failed. Or, before you leave Happy
        > Isles, you can put it on the areas where you tend to get blisters. Your
        > choice.
        >
        > I agree with the comments of others that there are many other things that
        > also help prevent the start of blisters, particularly pre-testing your
        > footwear before the hike, good wool socks (I love the SmartWool PhD line),
        > using liner socks, keeping your feet dry, airing them out when possible,
        > and immediately addressing any hot spot. But I think people "dis" moleskin
        > because they wait too long to put it on. Moleskin is a lousy cure; it's a
        > great preventative. So much better than the oh-so-macho duct tape I see
        > people trying.
        >
        > John
        >
      • Roleigh Martin
        Yes, I forgot those in my list but do not forget to bring em! However, I find the cheap knock-off croks sold at the local 99 cent store (made in China) weigh
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 3 6:50 PM
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          Yes, I forgot those in my list but do not forget to bring 'em!  However, I find the cheap knock-off croks sold at the local 99 cent store (made in China) weigh 50% of the weight of the croks, 3.5 oz apiece instead of 7 oz apiece.  Cost under $10.  They work just fine for camp sandals and water sandals.

          -------------------------------------------------
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          On Sat, Jun 30, 2012 at 11:39 PM, Jack Pence <jackpence@...> wrote:
           

          It's amazing how many theories and methods are out there on foot care...it seems that you just have to experiment and find out what works for you.
          I used to get blisters but I am now blister-free feet with the following:
          ...
           
          6.  Creek or Lake wash and then crocks for camp.  

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