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RE: [John Muir Trail] Re: Honey Crystals

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  • Joe MacLeish
    I have honey that is many years old and mostly crystallized. It won t pour and it has to be pure honey crystals because it is/was pure natural honey in the
    Message 1 of 11 , May 31, 2012

      I have honey that is many years old and mostly crystallized.  It won’t pour and it has to be pure honey crystals because it is/was pure natural honey in the bottle.  Is that what you call Honey crystals?  I spoon it out cause it won’t pour.  Tastes pretty much the same as regular honey.. I use it in my tea.

       

      Joe

       

      From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andy Dischekenyan
      Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 10:25 PM
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Honey Crystals

       

       

      I just don't think pure honey crystals exist. Most of the brands out there have either molasses, cane sugar or a blend of both with honey - drastically reducing the content of actual honey in the product. Will keep digging & let yall know if I come up with anything. 

    • John Ladd
      ... heat it gently in your microwave. I don t know why it works, but it does. I m still not sure why people want dry honey. It s just not that hard to carry in
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 1, 2012
        On Thu, May 31, 2012 at 10:36 PM, Joe MacLeish <jmacleish@...> wrote:
         

        I have honey that is many years old and mostly crystallized.  It won’t pour and it has to be pure honey crystals because it is/was pure natural honey in the bottle.  Is that what you call Honey crystals?  I spoon it out cause it won’t pour.  Tastes pretty much the same as regular honey.. I use it in my tea.

         

        Joe


        BTW, if you want to turn crystallized honey back to the thick liquid, just heat it gently in your microwave. I don't know why it works, but it does.

        I'm still not sure why people want dry honey. It's just not that hard to carry in the normal form.  You can get 2-oz and 4-oz wide-mouth Nalgene bottles at REI.  The last honey stuck in the bottle comes out if you add a little hot water to the bottle and give it a shake. The 4-oz. costs $1.70


        If you gently warm up the honey in the microwave (or a pan of hot water) it becomes easier to pour it into the Nalgene.    

        John
      • hmdsierra
        Only pyre honey will crystallize. Some do easier then others. Cotton honey will crystallize about the quickest. Creamed honey is crystallized honey that
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 1, 2012
          Only pyre honey will crystallize. Some do easier then others. Cotton honey will crystallize about the quickest. Creamed honey is crystallized honey that has been run through a mill to make it a bit smoother.

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Joe MacLeish" <jmacleish@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have honey that is many years old and mostly crystallized. It won't pour
          > and it has to be pure honey crystals because it is/was pure natural honey in
          > the bottle. Is that what you call Honey crystals? I spoon it out cause it
          > won't pour. Tastes pretty much the same as regular honey.. I use it in my
          > tea.
          >
          >
          >
          > Joe
          >
          >
          >
          > From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com]
          > On Behalf Of Andy Dischekenyan
          > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 10:25 PM
          > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Honey Crystals
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I just don't think pure honey crystals exist. Most of the brands out there
          > have either molasses, cane sugar or a blend of both with honey - drastically
          > reducing the content of actual honey in the product. Will keep digging & let
          > yall know if I come up with anything.
          >
        • Andy Dischekenyan
          Joe,  What you describes sometimes happens to honey - especially if it gets cold, but that s not what we re referring to. You can check
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 1, 2012
            Joe, 

            What you describes sometimes happens to honey - especially if it gets cold, but that's not what we're referring to. You can check out http://www.honeycrystals.com/ to get an idea of what I'm looking for but the one in the link is mixed with either cane sugar, molasses, or both. 

            I'm looking for pure honey crystals but not sure if it even exists. 

            Andy
            yogihiker.blogspot.com

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