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Re: Using bear boxes south of MTR?

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  • rnperky@sbcglobal.net
    Eric, The Ursack is a great way to go for your extra food. Take a look at their website for proper tying methods, ( figure-8 knot ). One of my hiking buddies
    Message 1 of 20 , May 1, 2012
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      Eric, The Ursack is a great way to go for your extra food. Take a look at their website for proper tying methods, ( figure-8 knot ). One of my hiking buddies uses the Ursack with the liner and has had no issues at all with it. Two words of advice with the Ursack though: don't hang it, a bear may not get at the food, but they will drag it off if not tied properly to a tree stump, and either way your food will be gone. Put food in it that you don't mind getting crushed unless you are packing the liner. Both the bag and the cord are Kevlar, so don't worry about them chewing through either, It is great for keeping out marmots at the Whitney trail juntion as well.

      When are you heading out on the JMT? You will love this trail! Have a great hike.



      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "eric" <samhandwich22@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have been phasing through all these responses trying to determine the best method for us. The bearikade expedition canister sounds like a good bet, but I would have to figure out what to do with its bulk first. I have a 65 liter pack right now that is going to be fully loaded with my BV500 and everything else. If I got the bearikade canister I suppose I could lash it to my pack's brain and just carry the food in a separate sack internally. I am considering getting an 80 liter pack to be used instead of the 65 if push comes to shove.
      >
      > However, I really like the idea of the Ursack even though I dont quite understand how the heck a pliable fabric can keep a bear from getting into ones food, though apparently the technology exists. I could see myself using the ursack on future trips to make hangs. Surely I will be able to fit everything into my BV 500 except for 2 days when I will have extra for the ursack. The question now is, how should I secure the ursack when near MTR? Should I hang it or just tie it to a tree with some p-cord so that a bear cant wander off with it (the bear might just chew through the p-cord)?
      >
      > Still considering the bearikade canister but with two of us needing to rent, $110 is a lot to rent. Maybe I can move some money around and just buy one.
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "eric" <samhandwich22@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Ok Im a little ashamed to admit that I am having trouble fitting 9 days worth of food into a bear canister, meant to feed me from my resupply at MTR until whitney portal. While I am scouring the net for ideas on how to make more dense meals, I cant understand how people manage to do it every year and I just cant fit everything in. My camp meals, ie. couscous, oatmeal, rice, etc dont seem to take up that much space. Its the trail foods that are killing it. Cliff bars, bags of trail mix, nuts, jelly beans- all of them are bulky and I cant seem to figure out a trail snack that isnt unless I want to resort to eating nothing but pure protein powder.
      > >
      > > Anyway, I do have a couple of peers who swear that there are bear boxes regularly placed on the trail and have advised me not to worry if I cant fit everything into a canister. So my questions are A) is this true? B) where is the map that conveniently marks all of their locations?
      > >
      > > Fitting everything into a bear canister is going to be a particular problem for the first two day's worth of hiking after MTR. This is my first long distance hike and I guess I am yet to master the art of making everything fit into a bear vault.
      > >
      >
    • eric
      I think I will go without the aluminum liner for now as we are already going to be carrying enough weight. The figure-8 is surely one of the most reliable
      Message 2 of 20 , May 1, 2012
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        I think I will go without the aluminum liner for now as we are already going to be carrying enough weight. The figure-8 is surely one of the most reliable knots I know of.

        We have two permit dates, one for june 30 and the other for july 14. I think we are leaning towards july 14 as it allows me for a little extra time for international travel prior to the trail. Not looking forward to dealing with the bugs and having to change my diet but I know it will be worth it!

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "rnperky@..." <rnperky@...> wrote:
        >
        > Eric, The Ursack is a great way to go for your extra food. Take a look at their website for proper tying methods, ( figure-8 knot ). One of my hiking buddies uses the Ursack with the liner and has had no issues at all with it. Two words of advice with the Ursack though: don't hang it, a bear may not get at the food, but they will drag it off if not tied properly to a tree stump, and either way your food will be gone. Put food in it that you don't mind getting crushed unless you are packing the liner. Both the bag and the cord are Kevlar, so don't worry about them chewing through either, It is great for keeping out marmots at the Whitney trail juntion as well.
        >
        > When are you heading out on the JMT? You will love this trail! Have a great hike.
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "eric" <samhandwich22@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have been phasing through all these responses trying to determine the best method for us. The bearikade expedition canister sounds like a good bet, but I would have to figure out what to do with its bulk first. I have a 65 liter pack right now that is going to be fully loaded with my BV500 and everything else. If I got the bearikade canister I suppose I could lash it to my pack's brain and just carry the food in a separate sack internally. I am considering getting an 80 liter pack to be used instead of the 65 if push comes to shove.
        > >
        > > However, I really like the idea of the Ursack even though I dont quite understand how the heck a pliable fabric can keep a bear from getting into ones food, though apparently the technology exists. I could see myself using the ursack on future trips to make hangs. Surely I will be able to fit everything into my BV 500 except for 2 days when I will have extra for the ursack. The question now is, how should I secure the ursack when near MTR? Should I hang it or just tie it to a tree with some p-cord so that a bear cant wander off with it (the bear might just chew through the p-cord)?
        > >
        > > Still considering the bearikade canister but with two of us needing to rent, $110 is a lot to rent. Maybe I can move some money around and just buy one.
        > >
        > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "eric" <samhandwich22@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Ok Im a little ashamed to admit that I am having trouble fitting 9 days worth of food into a bear canister, meant to feed me from my resupply at MTR until whitney portal. While I am scouring the net for ideas on how to make more dense meals, I cant understand how people manage to do it every year and I just cant fit everything in. My camp meals, ie. couscous, oatmeal, rice, etc dont seem to take up that much space. Its the trail foods that are killing it. Cliff bars, bags of trail mix, nuts, jelly beans- all of them are bulky and I cant seem to figure out a trail snack that isnt unless I want to resort to eating nothing but pure protein powder.
        > > >
        > > > Anyway, I do have a couple of peers who swear that there are bear boxes regularly placed on the trail and have advised me not to worry if I cant fit everything into a canister. So my questions are A) is this true? B) where is the map that conveniently marks all of their locations?
        > > >
        > > > Fitting everything into a bear canister is going to be a particular problem for the first two day's worth of hiking after MTR. This is my first long distance hike and I guess I am yet to master the art of making everything fit into a bear vault.
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • M L
        I have been phasing through all these responses trying to determine the best method for us. The bearikade expedition canister sounds like a good bet, but I
        Message 3 of 20 , May 2, 2012
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          I have been phasing through all these responses trying to determine the best method for us. The bearikade expedition canister sounds like a good bet, but I would have to figure out what to do with its bulk first. I have a 65 liter pack right now that is going to be fully loaded with my BV500 and everything else. If I got the bearikade canister I suppose I could lash it to my pack's brain and just carry the food in a separate sack internally. I am considering getting an 80 liter pack to be used instead of the 65 if push comes to shove.

          Last summer my husband and I rented Bearikade Expeditions for our hike.  My pack is a Mariposa Plus (approx. 59 liters total, 46 for the main bag) and my husband's pack is an Exos 58.  Each of us was able to fit our Expedition in our pack, vertically, with our other gear under and around it.  I guess it depends on what else you are bringing on your trip.  We try to be lightweight (tarp, no chairs, etc.) but we wouldn't qualify as "ultralight."  My pack had all our shared gear--tarp, cook kit, first aid, etc.  My husband's Exos is Osprey's curved frame type, and even with that he was able to use the Expedition.  So yes you should be able to use a 65 liter pack with an Expedition.

          Mina
        • John
          FYI My Bearikade Weekender fits vertically into my Osprey Atmos 50 with room to spare and not extending the collar of the pack s main compartment. If I had an
          Message 4 of 20 , May 2, 2012
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            FYI 

            My Bearikade Weekender fits vertically into my Osprey Atmos 50 with room to spare and not extending the collar of the pack's main compartment.  If I had an Expedition (at the same diameter and 4" longer), I know I could extend the collar and make it work in my pack at only 50L and with a "self-modified", curved Osprey frame. 

            Like Mina said, I too would fall into the lightweight rather than UL category, so the rest of my load isn't minimalist nor full of luxuries either.  Be sure to take a look at your packing strategy and efficiency around your canister before resorting to strapping it on the outside of your pack. 

            John

            On May 2, 2012, at 8:00 AM, M L <minafall2004_7@...> wrote:

             





            I have been phasing through all these responses trying to determine the best method for us. The bearikade expedition canister sounds like a good bet, but I would have to figure out what to do with its bulk first. I have a 65 liter pack right now that is going to be fully loaded with my BV500 and everything else. If I got the bearikade canister I suppose I could lash it to my pack's brain and just carry the food in a separate sack internally. I am considering getting an 80 liter pack to be used instead of the 65 if push comes to shove.

            Last summer my husband and I rented Bearikade Expeditions for our hike.  My pack is a Mariposa Plus (approx. 59 liters total, 46 for the main bag) and my husband's pack is an Exos 58.  Each of us was able to fit our Expedition in our pack, vertically, with our other gear under and around it.  I guess it depends on what else you are bringing on your trip.  We try to be lightweight (tarp, no chairs, etc.) but we wouldn't qualify as "ultralight."  My pack had all our shared gear--tarp, cook kit, first aid, etc.  My husband's Exos is Osprey's curved frame type, and even with that he was able to use the Expedition.  So yes you should be able to use a 65 liter pack with an Expedition.

            Mina

          • Joe MacLeish
            Endorsing I think what Barbara said, try Berner s packers. You can get a resupply on the trail or at Charlotte Lake (a little more than half way to Whitney).
            Message 5 of 20 , May 2, 2012
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              Endorsing I think what Barbara said, try Berner’s packers.  You can get a resupply on the trail or at Charlotte Lake (a little more than half way to Whitney).  You don’t have to carry the full load and your stuff fits in a weekender Bearicade.  I have only used the weekender for years and it almost always works.  There might be a bit of extra on the first day out of MTR.  The total load is certainly less.  Weekender weighs less than the Expedition and the total weight of food is almost half.  Try it, you’ll like it,

              Joe

               

              From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of senorcalicokat
              Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:38 AM
              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Using bear boxes south of MTR?

               

               

              I used a Bearikade Expedition for my JMT last year. The section from MTR To Whitney Portal was indeed the toughest to cram all the food not to mention the shock your body will feel when you go from little to nothing in your bearikade to a over flowing one. Those first few miles out of MTR where truly a shock.

              I took all my Mountain House meals and repackaged them into quart sized freezer bags. I added the boiling water right into the freezer bags and ate right out of them. Saved lots of room in the bearikade and alot less trash.

              I ate Pro Bars, Bear Valley Pemmican Bars, Trail Mix, M&M's and Jump Start Smoothies from Pack It Gourmet. I was able to get eight days of food into the bearikade this way. The one extra night of food I left out in my pack and ate it that night so all my food was secure the first night. I was not able to fit my toiletries in the bearikade, but luckliy nothing wanted to eat my toothpaste or deodorant :)

              Send yourself some special goodies in your re-supply bucket to eat at MTR while you sort through your loot and something to eat on the trail that first day. You will be glad you did :)

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